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  1. Infection Prevention and Control Assessment Tool for Nursing Homes Preparing for COVID-19 There is never an issue of too much information or repeated redundancy of information when it comes to the current pandemic [COVID-19]. Take a moment to review these CDC overview guidance published May 8, 2020. CDC provides the much needed up to date research and educational materials on the topic – visit: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/assessment-tool-for-nursing-homes.html CDC’s COVID-19 Infection Control Assessment and Response (ICAR) tool was developed to help nursing homes prepare for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Nursing homes and other long-term care facilities can take steps to assess and improve their preparedness for responding to COVID-19. This ICAR tool should be used as one tool to develop a comprehensive COVID-19 response plan. This tool may also contain content relevant for assisted living facilities. Health departments can use this tool to assess infection prevention practices and guide quality improvement activities (e.g., by addressing identified gaps). This tool may be used for remote (e.g., by telephone or video chat) or onsite assessment. This tool may also be used by healthcare facilities to conduct internal quality improvement audits. ICAR Items assessed in the ICAR support the key strategies of: Keeping COVID-19 out of the facility Identifying infections as early as possible Preventing spread of COVID-19 in the facility Assessing and optimizing personal protective equipment (PPE) supplies Identifying and managing severe illness in residents with COVID-19 Areas assessed in the ICAR include: Visitor restriction (HCP)[ 1 ]Education, monitoring, and screening of healthcare personnel Education, monitoring, and screening of residents Ensuring availability of PPE and other supplies Ensuring adherence to recommended infection prevention and control (IPC) practices Communicating with the health department and other healthcare facilities Health care personnel (HCP) are defined as paid and unpaid persons serving in health care settings who have the potential for direct or indirect exposure to patients or infectious materials. The following link takes you to CDC published guidelines for Infection Prevention and Control Assessment Tool. This is an infection control assessment and response tool (ICAR) that can be used to help nursing homes prepare for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This tool may also contain content relevant for assisted living facilities. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/hcp/assessment-tool-nursing-homes.pdf We wish to thank you for caring for our elderly population and for unselfishly dedicating yourself as essential personnel on the front lines each and every day, particularly during today’s current challenges - you are truly making a “world” of difference. . . With heartfelt gratitude from all those you serve and their loved ones! Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org This course will provide the Activity Director with the reasons that fostering inter-generational relationships are so beneficial for both younger and older populations. At one time families lived close to one another and developed deep relationships. In this course I will provide background on family traditions and help you to understand the importance of keeping younger and older people connected. Spending time with each other, being involved with each other’s activities, and showing love for one another gives each group a reason to live more fulfilling lives. Small children bring joy and delight to the elderly just by being in their presence. When teens and young adults listen to and appreciate the elderly reminiscing about life experiences it gives the elderly a feeling of significance. Many examples of existing intergenerational programs, ideas for group activities, 1-to-1 activities including family history discussion questions, arts and crafts projects, and educational activities are included in this course. Just remember we walk along the path of life together and that is what we want our younger and older population to do. Workshop Objectives: Upon completion the student will understand how intergenerational relationships benefit both young and old. The student will understand the importance of implementing programming that creates social connections between residents and children, teens, and young adults through activities. Upon completion the student will have many new ideas that will inspire them to start their own intergenerational program in their facility or in the community. The student will have a variety of activities, projects, and educational materials that may be incorporated directly into their activity programming. Workshop Content: Family Traditions of the Past Where We are Today Preschools within Nursing Homes Intergenerational Programs for Nursing Homes Intergenerational Programs in the Community Group Activities 1-to-1 Activities Arts and Crafts Projects Educational Activities Resources ENROLL Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  2. Click on the word Community on the black bar above and then on Downloads, there are forms in the download area that might help. There are a couple of participation forms.
  3. Stamped Clay Bowls Source: Gathering Beauty Materials Air Dry Clay Selection of Stamps or anything else you could use to make an impression Ink Pad Set of Small Bowls Rolling Pin Craft Knife Sandpaper Directions 1. Take your air dry clay and knead until soft. Roll your clay out to about 3mm thick. 2. Ink up your stamp and press firmly onto the clay. Repeat until you have covered the clay with your stamped design.... Full Directions HERE Our imaginations are colored with our own experiences, visions and thoughts. When something is verbally descried, there could be a myriad of different pictures that pop into each individual's mindscape. Wouldn't' it be interesting to see how we all mentally interpret the same thing, but in different ways? This activity allows you to do just that! Complete this activity with your residents and then create a display to help symbolize the importance of individuality and perception. The Eye of the Beholder Materials Paper Paint/Colored Pencils Miscellaneous Art Supplies (see below) Directions Type up a description of something. For example: Their is an older man sitting and waiting for his grandchildren to come visit him. Hand this written description to participants and ask them to interpret it through art in some way. They could do a collage, an abstract, a painting, sketch, a musical piece, a sculpture, etc. Whatever they are inspired to create based on this description. Create a display with the written description in the center and post the artwork around it. Title the display "The Eye of the Beholder". You could have others vote on them if you like and include the winners in your newsletter. Under the Sea Graham Crackers Source: The First Year Blog Total Time: 20 minutes https://thefirstyearblog.com/under-the-sea-graham-crackers/ Ingredients Graham crackers Graham cracker crumbs, in bowl Gold fish crackers White ball sprinkles Green and red long sprinkles, or jimmies Round red sprinkles Blue buttercream 1 stick of butter, room temperature 1/2 cup vegetable shortening (can use butter instead) 2 cups powdered sugar teal or blue food coloring Get Full Recipe HERE Circa 1950's How much did you pay for your swimsuit? Enroll Now Over a 100 Graduates this session, Be a Nationally Certified Activity Director with NAAPCC . The Healthcare Front Lines need qualified personnel , the faster we get the work done, the faster we can get back to work! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  4. https://nccdp.org/magazine/2020/summer/ The ICCDP / NCCDP Dementia / Memory Care Professionals Summer 2020 new is available to read online. The "Best Activity Cart on the Net Contest" winner is revealed! Activity Directors Network will soon be offering the NCCDP Certification Course taught by M. Celeste Chase AC-Edu-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP
  5. Why ADLs and IADLs Matter These terms stand for Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs). They represent key life tasks that people need to manage, in order to live at home and be fully independent. Accurate assessment of the individuals “ADLs or IADLs” functionality are in great part essential information to planning facility programs that meet the needs of the resident population served. Difficulties with ADLs and IADLs often correspond to how much help, supervision, and hands-on care an older person needs. This can determine the cost of care and the level of care within a residential living facility. It also determines whether someone is considered “safe” to live at home or even whether a person meets eligibility requirements for certain long-term care services. Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) These are the basic self-care tasks that we initially learn as very young children. They are sometimes referred to as “Basic Activities of Daily Living” (BADLs). They include: Walking, or otherwise getting around the home or outside. The technical term for this is “ambulating.” Feeding, as in being able to get food from a plate into one’s mouth. Dressing and grooming, as in selecting clothes, putting them on, and adequately managing one’s personal appearance. Toileting, which means getting to and from the toilet, using it appropriately, and cleaning oneself. Bathing, washing one’s face and body in the bath or shower. Transferring, which means being able to move from one body position to another. This includes being able to move from a bed to a chair, or into a wheelchair. This can also include the ability to stand up from a bed or chair in order to grasp a walker or other assistive device. For each ADL, people can vary from needing just a little help (such as a reminder or stand-by assist*) to full dependency, which requires others to do the task for them. *Stand-By Assistance refers to the need for someone to assist another individual performing activities that are basic to daily living. Unlike someone who needs continual supervision (i.e. all the time), a person who needs standby assistance has to have a caregiver within arm's reach of the individual at all times to prevent, by physical intervention as necessary, injury to the individual while the individual is performing the activity of daily living (ADL), for example, being ready to catch the individual if the individual falls while getting into or out of the bathtub or shower as part of bathing. Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) These are the self-care tasks we usually learn as teenagers. They require more complex thinking skills, including organizational skills. They include: Managing finances, such as paying bills and managing financial assets. Managing transportation, either via driving or by organizing other means of transport. Shopping and meal preparation. This covers everything required to get a meal on the table. It also covers shopping for clothing and other items required for daily life. Housecleaning and home maintenance. This means cleaning kitchens after eating, keeping one’s living space reasonably clean and tidy, and keeping up with home maintenance. Managing communication, such as the telephone and mail. Managing medications, which covers obtaining medications and taking them as directed. Why ADLs and IADLs Matter Generally, older adults need to be able to manage ADLs and IADLs in order to live independently without the assistance of another person. It’s important to understand ADLs when determining the proper level of care for the individual resident. Some ADLs require minimal care while others, like toileting, require 24/7 care. Geriatricians assess ADLs and IADLs as part of assessing an older person’s “function.” Problems with ADLs and IADLs usually reflect problems with physical health and/or cognitive health. Identifying functional difficulties can help us diagnose and manage important health problems. Another crucial role ADLs play is in providing a standard that many insurance companies use to determine the level of coverage to provide. The number of ADLs a senior needs help with, will usually determine whether or not they qualify for assistance in paying for an assisted living home, a nursing home, or in-home care. For many long-term care insurance policies, the inability to perform two ADLs or more is the point where the insurance provider will start paying on the policy. https://www.pioneernetwork.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Definitions-of-Common-Terms-Used-in-Long-Term-Care-and-Culture-Change.pdf Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Workshop Objectives: Upon completion the student will understand the concept of unconditional love between a pet therapy animal and a person. The student will know the different purposes of therapy pets. Upon completion the student will understand the many benefits of pet therapy. The student will read a wide variety of Teacher Tales to illustrate the benefits. The student will be given information on several national pet therapy organizations that they can draw from to get their own pet therapy program started. Workshop Content: Love—Our Basic Need What is Pet Therapy? Benefits--Importance of Pet Therapy Pet Therapy Visits In-House Therapy Pets Inviting A Team to Your Facility Resources Information and Sample Forms of National Organizations ENROLL Now Now Enrolling for the September 1st class - Visit ActivityDirector.org to enroll. 114 Graduates this month! NAAPCC.net Est. 2011 Members NCCA Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  6. National Day of Prayer September 1st Celebrate by organizing a prayer circle. Get permission from residents who wish to participate to pass their prayer request to another resident, creating a prayer chain. Encourage participants to try organizing their prayers utilizing the ACTS of Prayer. Below is some guidance on this practice: “Do you ever sit down to pray and just not know what to say? ‘ACTS’ is a common acronym that Christians use for leading themselves through these moments. Using this well-known tool, you’ll first pray in “adoration” of God, then in “confession,” thanksgiving,” and supplication [petition].” It was used famously by Billy Graham. But it’s no modern fad, its oldest usage dating back to 1883. Many believers throughout the years, including me, have needed help knowing what to pray and how to pray it. I’m grateful that ACTS reminds us all to worship, repent, and express gratitude before we present our requests for help. It’s good practice in putting ourselves last, as Jesus would have us do (“So the last will be first…” Matthew 20:16).” Excerpt from Hosting a Bible Study by Allison Lewis Bennett, AD/TXC Source: Anchor Devotional by Haven Ministries. Oct 2016 Ed. Now is the time to connect more than ever and we are forced to make those connections using technology. Add some variety and intimacy to the interactions by panning this heartwarming activity for September. Have your interested residents record themselves reading one of their favorite stories on a video for their grandchildren. Many books can be found for free online or accessed through a Kindle Unlimited account. The other option is to have the child’s parent use a book the child already owns and loves. The resident could read the transcribed words while the parent follows along at home, showing the child the pictures. Be sure and have the family members records the video for a special memory. NOTE: These videos are for personal use only. Special permissions are generally needed for reading an author’s work in a public video, for example your facility’s website. Free Queso Day September 17th The Queso Cart Celebrate Free Queso Day by setting up a Queso Cart! It flows right off the tongue, right! I included a recipe below that should be flexible enough to suit all tastes, provided you exclude or reduce some of the hotter components depending. Click the button below the ingredients list to read the full directions and there is even a video you can click on if you prefer to watch the directions. Serve in a single serve disposable cup with a small bag of chips or other cheese carrier. Topping Suggestions Pico Avocado Jalapenos Ground beef Lime wedge Drink Suggestion Limeade Crockpot Queso Total Time: 1 hour Servings: 16 people Author: Becky Hardin - The Cookie Rookie Ingredients 2 14.5 ounce cans Fire-Roasted Tomatoes with Green Chilies Rotel-style 2 12 ounce cans whole fat evaporated milk Juice of 1-2 limes 1 pound white American block cheese, cubed or thinly sliced and chopped 1 pound yellow American block cheese, cubed or thinly sliced and chopped 1 pound Velveeta Queso Blanco cheese, cubed 1 7.06 package shredded Supremo Mexican Blend cheese ½ bunch cilantro chopped 2 tablespoons olive or canola oil 2-3 jalapeno peppers seeded & ribs removed, diced ½ medium yellow onion diced 1 teaspoon ground cumin ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon chili powder optional Get Full Recipe HERE National One-Hit Wonder Day September 25th Play some of these songs for your residents and see if they remember any of them. Which ones were their favorites? One Hit Wonders from the 50’s The Silhouettes – "Get a Job" (1957) Ronald & Ruby – "Lollipop" (1958) Bobby Day – "Rockin' Robin" (1958) The Monotones – "The Book of Love" (1958) Laurie London – "He's Got the Whole World in His Hands" (1958) The Jamies - "Summertime, Summertime" (1958) Frankie Ford – "Sea Cruise" (1959) The Mystics – “Hushabye” (1959) Larry Hall – "Sandy" (1959) Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_one-hit_wonders_in_the_United_States Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  7. You may not think you will want to reflect on this time, but one day you will. This is a momentous time and is incomparable to any other health event in our history. You are the front line workers, who are dedicating yourselves day in and day out for the well being of your residents. Take this time to create a capsule that you and your residents can dig up at a later date when the dust has settled so that you can truly take in what you all accomplished. You can never doubt your strengths or resilience again! Quarantine Time Capsule Materials Shoe Box/Plastic Box/Empty Paint Can Markers Shovel Personal Items Examples Pictures A craft made during this time Newspaper articles Thumb drive with documents/conferences/music Grocery store receipt Letter to your future self Journal entry about your current struggles and favorite memories Prediction about how the quarantine will come to an end and when Angel figurine to watch over the capsule Directions Decorate your capsule with phrases or words that represent this time period. Be sure and include the date. In the example picture above, the individual took pictures and coupons ads and used Mod Podge to adhere them to the can. Fill your box with items that you feel you or your residents may benefit from reflecting on in the future. Seal your box closed and bury it somewhere around the facility. Make a map showing where it is buried and hang it in the facility with the planned open date displayed. Choose an open date that is at least one year from the date of creation. Puzzle time looks quite a bit different then it use to around our facilities. Making this easy and quick portable puzzle board gives your residents the freedom to work on their puzzles while in their doorways or other areas that are less isolated then their rooms. You could create a Puzzle Time where your interested residents all come in their doorways with their puzzle boards and work on them together with a bit of distance and socialization. Load your cart up and serve snacks while they work. DIY Portable Puzzle Board Yields 1 Materials 1/2" Board, cut to about 23x30 Decorative Duck Tape Set of Handles Directions Purchase 1/2" scrap wood from your local home improvement store. Most offer a service that will cut the board to the size you need at no extra cost. Wrap the edges with decorative duck tape to prevent splinters and to add style. Screw in handles on either side. Voila! Shot Glass Appetizers Single serve disposable food items are the order of the day! We all need creative ways to serve our residents, while offering a bit of variety into the mix. Enter: Shot Glass Appetizers! These fun recipes give you the opportunity to be creative with your choices, while still being mindful of germs. There are tons of combinations that can be utilized and plastic shot glasses can be purchased relatively inexpensively. Check out some of the options above to get you going. A quick internet search will provide you with tons of ideas and recipes to get you started right away. Cheers! Combination Ideas Veggies and Dill Dip Fruit and Cream Cheese Dip Olive Medley and Feta Cheese Tomato Soup and Mozzarella Cheese Sticks/Grilled Cheese Triangle/Pimento Cheese Triangle Whipped Cream, Strawberry and Angel Food Cake 7 Layer Bean Dip and Tortilla Chip Pudding and Vanilla Wafers Shrimp and Cocktail Sauce or Tartar Sauce Churro Bites and Caramel Sauce Meatballs and Marinara Sauce Vintage Health Poster Circa 1950 Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  8. As you review the care plan history, take note on how care plan documentation lends itself towards an integrated team care approach. While history shows that fundamental care plans were initially used as care guidelines for volunteers without medical experience or training; you will see that it later develops into one of today’s most valuable instruments for quality measures, nursing home payment, and state inspections. Let’s take a look at the historical care plan development over the centuries and its relevance in supporting continuity of care. 31st BC (3100 BC to 3001 BC) -15th Century Historically speaking, medical oversight was primarily focused in reactive care mode; treatment was rendered based on symptoms without much thought to taking preventative measures for the individual’s future health. The middle ages brought about explanations that the medical phenomenon was connected to spirituality and religious belief systems. Preceding modern medicine, most of the care regimens provided to patients were focused on either external symptoms, or a spiritual or magical basis. 16th-19th Century The 16th through the 19th century brought about a period of heavy scientific discovery, leading to the transition of supernatural explanations to natural explanations for disease and illness. People began to see illness as something that could eventually be eradicated, and saw health as a natural state of the body that should be maintained and protected, further stepping away from traditional notions of supernatural explanations or divine punishment. 1930s The 1930s marked the entry of clinically driven” care plans” into focus for nursing professionals. When the length of hospital stays increased, there was time due to the length of stays to implement written plans. (Nursing team leads would often use care plans as a guide for the less-educated members of the team). 1970s The emergence of “life care planning” involved many industry professionals during this time. The converging principles of the fields of “Experimental Analysis of Behavior” (EAB), development psychology, and case management established “life care planning” factors: a summartive statement, communication tool, preventative planning, basic components, individualized plans, and needs come first ideology. 1980s In the 1980s and the following decades; “life care planners” were involved in consultations with insurance carriers and also with attorneys involved in litigation. “Life care planning” played a large initial role in the field of litigation. It has since expanded into elder care, chronic illness and discharge planning. It has also expanded the number and types of professions who can each be involved in a part of care planning. 2000s The extent of professionals and care providers expanded with individual cases coming from rehabilitation counseling, rehabilitation nursing, physciatrist, and case management professions. Both paper based and digital technology based “care plans” were regularly being used by patients and their care providers. A proliferation of digital technology based care plans also began to take hold in later years. Current Day Today, nursing home care plan data is used for quality measures, nursing home payment, and state inspections. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) transitioned Medicare to the more quality-based practice of reimbursing for care management of eligible patients. Other private insurance companies are beginning to follow suit to prioritize consistent, preventative care facilitated by patient-accessible care plans. Excerpt from The Care Plan- A Road Map CE Course by M. Celeste Chase This course takes you through the Activity Departments required documentation process from the Baseline Care Plan through the final creation of the Comprehensive Care Plan. Particularly focus is tailored to the individuality of the resident and that care plans are in no way intended to be “cookie cutter” care plans. An appropriate and useful care plan begins with an effective and complete individualized assessment. When designing a care plan for each resident the professional must ensure that multiple sources within the Interdisciplinary Team assessments are considered to address the resident’s specific needs. The care plan you write must address these issues. The care plan is a representation of the accumulation of the facility’s assessment process. It is the final compilation of the individual resident’s problems, needs, and strengths. The care plan definitively scopes the resident’s care treatment process, describing conditions to be treated, expected outcomes, and the specific customized care services to be rendered. This course is intended to help you to become more proficient and savvy when it comes to realistic and relevant care plan development. Workshop Objectives: Understand care plan relevance relating to resident treatment Learn how care plans have evolved historically Understand the development process leading to the care plan creation Understand how to implement SMART care plan goals Utilizing IDT assessment tools data for care planning Understanding resident rights in care planning participation Recognize the progress notes and care plan relationship Recognize the initial assessment and monthly calendar relationship Revising the care plan – why or why not Merging care plans – consolidate IDT members contributions When to use short term care plans Understand Rehabilitation care plans Workshop Content: Care Plan Overview – What is this document? The History of Care Plan Development Understanding SMART Goals The Process – Baseline Care Plan to Comprehensive Care Planning Reporting Timeliness Common Care Plan Mistakes Care Plan Examples General Documentation Principles Documentation Corrections About Your Instructor Celeste was involved in the startup of a medical adult day center in the role of Activity Director and worked closely with the Alzheimer’s Association, Massachusetts Chapter during to develop program modules to serve the Alzheimer’s diagnosed participants. She was exclusively instrumental in the successfully implementation of the center’s Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP); working with the state to create the centers reporting structure and standards for compliance to state specified regulations. Celeste was recognized for her business development contributions and was became the Centers’ Program Director. Celeste has served as consultant and “Guest Instructor” for Activity Directors Network since 2011- supporting the student educational experience in pursuit of Activity Director Certification. She is currently lead instructor for Activity Directors Network and author of the National Activity Professional Training Course (NAPT). Celeste continues to support educational opportunities as the author of The Activity Consultant’s Help Desk since its inception in 2018. This Activity Directors Network newsletter reaches a readership with interest in further developing of their professional knowledge base as senior care industry professionals. She has also written Continuing Education (CEU) courses and has authored the “Behavioral Health Programming Guide for Skilled Nursing Facilities”. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  9. From NAAPCC NAAPCC DOES MEET FEDERAL TAG #658 NOTICE TO ALL ACTIVITY PROFESSIONALS Contrary to a notice posted 7-1-20 sent out by another organization, NAAPCC DOES meet federal Tag #658 as it is written and will post the full regulation on our website. You can also find it at the CMS website. The regulation states that CMS accepts the standards of ANY accrediting body or State Association, not just NAAP. The Training courses accepted under F Tag 680 only have to meet State approval. They DO NOT need to meet NAAP's approval or be accepted by them. NAAP is a membership organization for Activity Professionals, just as there are other organizations for Activity Professionals. No organization has the authority to approve someone else's work or decide what CMS will accept, nor is that stated anywhere in the regulations. NAAP has their own education and it would be a conflict of interest for them to approve or not approve other courses. The Creators of the NAPT course have no obligation to hand it over to anyone else for review. While NAAP is mentioned by name in one section, along with several other entities in F Tag 658, it is not an exclusive recognition, and following NAAP's name is the word "etc", meaning other organization standards are also recognized, including State Associations and Accrediting bodies, which does in fact include NAAPCC. Please be assured the information released is inaccurate. CMS has been recognizing and accepting NAAPCC certifications since 2011 and they also accept any State approved course per F Tag 680. If NAAP chooses to not promote other courses or certifications, that is their right, but they have no authority to decide what meets regulations. Please read below! The Highlighted sections dictate how NAAPCC meets the regulation. NAAPCC Standards are posted on the website. Recommended resources for manuals, etc., are also located on our website. o F658 GUIDANCE §483.21(b)(3)(i) “Professional standards of quality” means that care and services are provided according to accepted standards of clinical practice. Standards may apply to care provided by a particular clinical discipline or in a specific clinical situation or setting. Standards regarding quality care practices may be published by a professional organization, licensing board, accreditation body or other regulatory agency. Recommended practices to achieve desired resident outcomes may also be found in clinical literature. Possible reference sources for standards of practice include: • Current manuals or textbooks on nursing, social work, physical therapy, etc. • Standards published by professional organizations such as the American Dietetic Association, American Medical Association, American Medical Directors Association, American Nurses Association, National Association of Activity Professionals, National Association of Social Work, etc. • Clinical practice guidelines published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. • Current professional journal articles. Our credentials are recognized by CMS under F tags 658 and 680. If you have any questions or concerns please call the office at 303-317-5682 or email us at naapcc.office@gmail.com. We're here to assist you in any way we can. NAAPCC NAAP Credentialing Center 17840 Weymouth Ave, Parker CO 80134 United States You received this email because you signed up on our website or made a purchase from us. Unsubscribe
  10. Lockdown Continues .. All of our CE Classes On Sale! 33% Off - As long as we are stuck inside we might as well make the most of it. New CEs by Celeste Chase, AC-Edu-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP , The Care Plan - A Road Map This course lays out the Care Plan procedure in a Person Centered dialogue, not the same old cookie cutter care plan, Explore new insights and planning tools to re-invent your way of thinking about care plans. New from Instructor: Allision Bennett, ADC/TXC Hosting a Bible Study One thing you do not want to do is to host a Bible Study with a group of elderly folks and not know your stuff !!! This course provides the basics of studying the Bible so that you will have some foundation to be better prepared to share with your residents. Studying the Bible can help you see the hope and joy that only Jesus can bring. New from Instructor: Gloria Hoffner Science for Seniors This course will guide you step by step in the use of everyday materials such as vinegar and baking soda to help residents discover their world. Instructor: Haley Burress "Must Play Well With Others: Training Your Team and Other Departments" Federal and State guidelines require Activity Professionals to train all disciplines on how to assure that each resident gets a great quality of life. However, in all types of care settings, this can be a challenge for even the most accomplished Activity Professional. This course will teach you a variety of ways to inspire, encourage and lead your team, as well as passing on that inspiration to different disciplines too. You will have the opportunity to learn how to train in a short amount of time, how to structure in-services, and how to keep Activities at the forefront of everyone’s mind. Instructor: Dr. Alison Ward "Therapeutically Enhanced Group Activities" This workshop focuses on relevant literature, experiential exercises, and skills that an activity professional would need to “therapeutically enhance” an activity group. This workshop rose out of a concern that older adults in the nursing home were not provided with enough opportunities to grow and develop. It incorporates theories of lifespan development, tenets of life review, existential-person-centered psychology, and basic listening skills. The intent is for activity professionals to use the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they have gained from this workshop to “enhance” their reminiscence-based activity groups. Visit Activity Directors Network ActivityDirector.org Our National Activity Professionals Training courses for NAAPCC National Certification Begins Aug 4th - Now Enrolling - The NAPT Course provides an 8wk Advanced Activity Training Course giving you the training and knowledge to Pass your National Exam, plus it also provides you with all 36 CE credits, both published and live to meet the NAAPCC Certification requirements for National Certification. Do you have 1yr of experience in the past 3yrs working with the Elderly, Assisting, Directing, Volunteering? Do you have a High School diploma or equivalent? Will you be able to Pass the National Competency Exam after you finish this class? A. yes Will you have the 36 Required Published CE credits and Live Credits to Meet Path 1 and 2 for NAAPCC National Certification? A. yes NAAPCC AP-BC National Certification could be within your reach! Call or Email NAAPCC Credentialing Center at 303)-317-5682 naapcc.office@gmail.com "The Affordable Choice" The certifications for Activity Professionals recognized under CMS.gov F Tag 680 are the NAAPCC AP-BC & AC-BC, NCCAP ADC & ACC, CTRS, OTR, and COTA. Visit https://www.activitydirector.org/classroom and Fill-Out an Enrollment Form to save your spot. Also be aware that we have an OwnPace option if your Schedule is "a little crazy" The NAPT National Activity Professionals Training is taught by Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, DMDCP - Celeste is NCCAP & NAAPCC Certified Educator and she was also Kathy Hughes Assistant for 8yrs, Our late Instructor. The Course Provides all the CE Requirements for Path 1&2 - NAAPCC Standards One Class, One exam, One National Certification NAAPCC "The Affordable Choice" Contact NAAPCC.Office@gmail.com Phone: 303-317-5682 Let their counselors reassure you you're on the right Path to National Board Certification See if you qualify! Check NAAPCC Standards NAAPCC Est. 2011 is the only Activity Credentialing Council that follows the ICE NCCA Standards for Accreditation They are NON-Profit. NOTE: SCAPA and Georgia Society will only advocate for NAAPCC National Board Certification. California, West Virginia, several States have NAAPCC Certified Instructors teaching Advanced Activity Programs for NAAPCC National Certification, Its your Choice! Your Affordable Choice . While you are enrolled and working towards any Accredited Certification Requirements you meet the F680 regulations set forth by the CMS.gov to insure each Activity Professional can complete their accrediting bodies standards. Here is the Federal Regulation For Activity Professionals from CMS.gov Most States do not have a State License or AD Register, these States are governed by F680 (most States) Section (ii) A . The Activities Program must be directed by a Activity Professional who is Eligible for Certification as a therapeutic recreation specialist or as an activities professional by a recognized accrediting body on or after Oct 1 1990. American Healthcare Association's Shelter in Place: Planning Resource Guide for Nursing Homes Keep Residents, Staff and Family Members up to date with this blank Covid-19 Newsletter Template. Made simply for your convenience: Step 1: Click on Button below Step 2: Fill in sections with your info. Step 3: Hit print or email. Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. {suite_name} {reg_total} {member_posts} {suite_url}
  11. Lockdown Continues .. All of our CE Classes On Sale! 33% Off - As long as we are stuck inside we might as well make the most of it. New CEs by Celeste Chase, AC-Edu-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP , The Care Plan - A Road Map This course lays out the Care Plan procedure in a Person Centered dialogue, not the same old cookie cutter care plan, Explore new insights and planning tools to re-invent your way of thinking about care plans. New from Allision Bennett, ADC/TXC Hosting a Bible Study One thing you do not want to do is to host a Bible Study with a group of elderly folks and not know your stuff !!! This course provides the basics of studying the Bible so that you will have some foundation to be better prepared to share with your residents. Studying the Bible can help you see the hope and joy that only Jesus can bring. New from Gloria Hoffner Science for Seniors This course will guide you step by step in the use of everyday materials such as vinegar and baking soda to help residents discover their world. Visit Activity Directors Network ActivityDirector.org Our National Activity Professionals Training for NAAPCC National Certification Begins Aug 4th - Now Enrolling - Will you have 1yr of experience in the past 3yrs working with the Elderly after you finish this course? Do you have a High School diploma or equivalent? Will you be able to Pass the National Competency Exam after you finish this class? A. yes Will you have the Required Published CE credits and Live Credits to Meet Path 2 for NAAPCC National Certification? A. yes NAAPCC AP-BC National Certification could be within your reach! Call or Email NAAPCC Credentialing Center at 303)-317-5682 naapcc.office@gmail.com "The Affordable Choice" The certifications for Activity Professionals recognized under CMS.gov F Tag 680 are the NAAPCC AP-BC & AC-BC, NCCAP ADC & ACC, CTRS, OTR, and COTA.
  12. View this email in your browser Cultural Assimilation (Adaptations) Cultural assimilation can become complicated when a resident can't control his or her life choices and decisions. Causing depression, extreme anxiety, and frustration. Staff can become frustrated if individuals are unwilling to cooperate with care as a result of these fears and anxieties. When residents feel uncomfortable with their surroundings because of language barriers or differences in social norms, they can feel threatened by different and strange-seeming mannerisms. For example, West Indian cultures often speak in loud voices. Asian caregivers are often reserved and might not appear to be as personally supportive. Culture Change Culture is the learned and shared knowledge that specific groups use to generate their behavior and interpret their experience of the world. It includes but is not limited to: Practices, Rituals. Languages, Values, Customs, Expected Behaviors, Roles, Thought, Ceremonies, Beliefs, Courtesies, Manners of Interacting, Communications Culture applies to racial, ethnic, religious, political, professional, and other social groups. It is transmitted through social and institutional traditions and norms that pass onto succeeding generations. Culture can appear paradoxical, while many aspects remain the same, it is also dynamic, constantly changing and evolving throughout the ages. It is comprised of beliefs about how people should interact with each other and how they should respond to the social and material surroundings in which they find themselves. • is applicable to all peoples • is value laden & rooted in belief systems • is active & dynamic • is multilayered & multidimensional • exists at conscious & unconscious levels • is often viewed as thick, thin, or compartmentalized • provides group member identity • structures perceptions & shapes behaviors (e.g. relationship to the natural world or traditional homelands) • varies in expression both among and between individual group members • permeates every aspect of life Culture is seen in religion, spirituality, morals, customs, politics, technologies, and basic survival strategies of any given group. It affects how groups work, parent, love, marry, and understand health, mental health, wellness, illness, disability, and end of life. It is only when we observe the other side that it is possible to reflect upon the similarities as well as the diversities of cultural life values and beliefs held by others. Multiple Cultural Identities Implications for Person-Centered Thinking, Planning and Practice Some individuals willingly adopt distinct cultural identities in different social settings (i.e., home culture versus organizational culture), while still others acquire permeable identities. Individuals draw from the accepted norms from within the cultural climate that surrounds them to behave in accordance with their social setting. This contributes to our understanding of how and when individuals adopt multiple cultural identities. As human beings, we have multiple cultural identities that can be grouped as follows. • Categorization – people identify with one of their cultural groups over others • Compartmentalization – individuals maintain multiple, separate identities within themselves • Integration – people link their multiple cultural identities Understanding multiple cultural identities helps us to move beyond one-dimensional conceptualizations of identity to an understanding of the complex, overlapping cultural influences that form each of us. "ADDRESSING" is a framework that enables therapists to better recognize and understand cultural influences as a multidimensional combination. Developed by Pamela Hays (1996, 2008), the “ADDRESSING” model is a framework that facilitates recognition and understanding of the complexities of individual identity. ... Each factor can help researchers understand underrepresented groups and oppressive forces. A - Age D - Developmental and acquired D - Disabilities R - Religion E - Ethnicity S - Socioeconomic status S - Sexual orientation I - Indigenous heritage, N - National origin, and G - Gender. Source: https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/encouraging-diversity-in-psychology Cultural Diversity The term cultural diversity is used to describe differences in ethnic or racial classification & self-identification, tribal or clan affiliation, nationality, language, age, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, socioeconomic status, education, religion, spirituality, physical and intellectual abilities, personal appearance, and other factors that distinguish one group or individual from another. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Path 2 to NAAPCC Board Certification - If you have 2000hrs of working with the elderly in the past 3yrs, If you have a High School Diploma or equivalent, if you have 36hrs of both Published and (12)Live CE hrs., Included in the NAPT Course. You will be eligible to take the National Certification Competency exam for National Activity Board Certification AP-BC. Call NAAPCC for details, (303) 317-5682 naapcc.office@gmail.com Your Experience Counts! The national certifications recognized under CMS F Tag 680 for Activity Professionals are the NAAPCC AP-BC & AC-BC, NCCAP ADC & ACC, CTRS, OTR, and COTA. American Healthcare Association's Shelter in Place: Planning Resource Guide for Nursing Homes Keep Residents, Staff and Family Members up to date with this blank Covid-19 Newsletter Template. Made simply for your convenience: Step 1: Click on Button below Step 2: Fill in sections with your info. Step 3: Hit print or email. Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  13. “Do you ever sit down to pray and just not know what to say? ‘ACTS’ is a common acronym that Christians use for leading themselves through these moments. Using this well-known tool, you’ll first pray in “adoration” of God, then in “confession,” thanksgiving,” and supplication [petition].” It was used famously by Billy Graham. But it’s no modern fad, its oldest usage dating back to 1883. Many believers throughout the years, including me, have needed help knowing what to pray and how to pray it. I’m grateful that ACTS reminds us all to worship, repent, and express gratitude before we present our requests for help. It’s good practice in putting ourselves last, as Jesus would have us do (“So the last will be first…” Matthew 20:16).” Excerpt from Hosting a Bible Study by Allison Lewis Bennett, AD/TXC Source: Anchor Devotional by Haven Ministries. Oct 2016 Ed. My desire is to assist you in “Hosting a Bible Study.” I will provide the basics of studying the Bible so that you will have some foundation to be better prepared to share with your residents. Studying the Bible can help you see the hope and joy that only Jesus can bring. I hope this Truth is life changing for you as it was for me. I heard an author on the radio this afternoon describe the Bible so well--“Every story whispers His name.” I pray that you and your residents will benefit from the many resources that I have provided you with to hold your own Bible study that comes alive with the truth of Jesus Christ. Workshop Objectives: Upon completion the student will understand that the Bible is reliable and is the book inspired by God, written through men, with the guidance of the Holy Spirit. The student will be shown study helps to understand the Bible. The student will be able to plan a lesson with the many resources provided. Upon completion the student will be able to hold an inspiring lesson that keeps their residents engaged. The student will be provided a list of Bible study guides, devotionals, hymnals, scriptures/Bibles, ministry resources, and gospel message tools to use with their residents. Workshop Content: Bible Background Understanding the Bible Planning a Lesson Hosting a Bible Study In-room Ministry Bible Study Materials & Resources Conclusion About the Instructor Allison Lewis Bennett, AD/TXC has been involved with seniors in different capacities in Long Term Care, Assisted Living, Memory Care, and Respite Care. She has a BFA in Graphic Design, but after a 20-year career in graphics returned to school to study to be an Activity Director. Being an Activity Director has given her an outlet to share her creativity with those who need love, attention, and someone to stimulate them mentally, spiritually, emotionally, and physically. Allison enjoys sharing her love with her residents and appreciates each special personality. She has been involved in Bible studies at her church for many years. Allison has also coordinated Bible studies for her residents with local churches, led singing, read devotionals, and provided object lessons to illustrate principles of the Bible. She has also had an in-room ministry as a volunteer in Long Term Care facilities. NAAPCC Pre-Approval #797 Enroll Now Activity Director News Update: The Georgia Society of Activity Professionals and South Carolina Activity Professionals Association... post support for the NAAPCC Credentialing Center and take stand against unethical credentialing bodies. "SCAPA has always been an organization of integrity and through many Presidents the past 31 years, has been led with the utmost professionalism and concern for Activity Professionals, with no attempts for personal gain. SCAPA has always been an advocate for fairness, the truth and for what is best for all Activity Professionals. SCAPA Board members will stand up and advocate for those rights despite the consequences. Going forward, SCAPA will not support, promote or recognize ANY organization that operates unethically or with conflicts of interest that are a detriment to the Activity profession, Activity Professionals, or that violates ethical business standards of practice." If you received malicious emails from other organizations, please disregard. Contact NAAPCC for details, we apologize. Web: www.NAAPCC.net E-Mail: office.naapcc@gmail.com Phone: (303) 317-5682 Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  14. The certifications recognized under CMS F Tag 680 are the NAAPCC AP-BC & AC-BC, NCCAP ADC & ACC, CTRS, OTR, and COTA. Hi, The certificate that you have is accepted and can be used towards the certification from NAAPCC . Call them and ask about your degree, they will set you on the best path, your experience counts with them.. their contact info : NAAPCC at 303-317-5682 or email us at naapcc.office@gmail.com. You can take our course if you wish, or they have an amazing text book that will assist you thru the activity National Board Certification Exam. Call them and if you need any other requirements or want to join our class, we would love to have you. ActivityDirector.org admin@activitydirector.net Its exciting to have a credentialing center that uses your experience to save you time. Dang I love the NAAPCC ! thanks Pennie
  15. Adaptive Strategies and Techniques Without a doubt, it is important to identify whether the residents have conditions and/or issues for which staff should implement adaptations to allow the resident to fully enjoy the experience. The following is a simplified reference guide examples of specific conditions and appropriate adaptations: Visual impairments: higher levels of lighting without glare; magnifying glasses, light-filtering lenses, telescopic glasses; use of “clock method” to describe where items are located; description of sizes, shapes, colors; large print items including playing cards, newsprint, books; audio books; Hearing impairments: small group activities; placement of resident near speaker/activity leader; use of amplifiers or headphones; decreased background noise; written instructions; use of gestures or sign language to enhance verbal communication; adapted TV (closed captioning, magnified screen, earphones); Physical limitations: the use of adaptive equipment, proper seating and positioning, placement of supplies and materials (based on clinical/nursing or physical therapy referral as appropriate) to enhance: Visual interaction and to compensate for loss of visual field (hemianopsia); Upper extremity function and range of motion (reach); Hand dexterity (e.g., adapted size of items such as larger handles for cooking and woodworking equipment, built-up paintbrush handles, large needles for crocheting); The ability to manipulate an item based upon the item’s weight, such as lighter weight for residents with muscle weakness; Use of only one hand: holders for kitchen items, magazines/books, playing cards; items (e.g., artwork, bingo card, nail file) taped to the table; c-clamp or suction vise to hold wood for sanding; Cognitive impairment: task segmentation and simplification; programs using retained long-term memory, rather than short-term memory; length of activities based on attention span; settings that recreate past experiences or increase/decrease stimulation; smaller groups without interruption; one-to-one activities; NOTE: The length, duration, and content of specific one-to-one activities are determined by the specific needs of the individual resident, such as several short interventions (rather than a few longer activities) if someone has extremely low tolerance or if there are behavioral issues. Examples of one-to-one activities may include any of the following: Sensory stimulation or cognitive therapy (e.g., touch/visual/auditory stimulation, reminiscence, or validation therapy) such as special stimulus rooms or equipment; alerting/upbeat music and using alerting aromas or providing fabrics or other materials of varying textures; Social engagement (e.g., directed conversation, initiating a resident to resident conversation, pleasure walk or coffee visit); Spiritual support, nurturing (e.g., daily devotion, Bible reading, or prayer with or for resident per religious requests/desires); Creative, task-oriented activities (e.g., music or pet activities/therapy, letter writing, word puzzles); Support of self-directed activity (e.g., delivering of library books, craft material to rooms, setting up talking book service). Language barrier: translation tools; translators; or publications and/or audio/video materials in the resident’s language; Terminally ill: life review; quality time with chosen relatives, friends, staff, and/or other residents; spiritual support; touch; massage; music; and/or reading to the resident; NOTE: Some residents may prefer to spend their time alone and introspectively. Their refusal of activities does not necessarily constitute noncompliance. Pain management: spiritual support, relaxation programs, music, massage, aromatherapy, pet therapy/pet visits, and/or touch; Solitary preferences/own room or is unable to leave room: in-room visits by staff/other residents/volunteers with similar interests/hobbies; touch and sensory activities such as massage or aromatherapy; access to art/craft materials, cards, games, reading materials; access to technology of interest (computer, DVD, hand held video games, preferred radio programs/stations, audio books); and/or visits from spiritual counselors; Altering sleep patterns: activities are available during awake time. Some facilities use a variety of options when activities staff are not available for a particular resident: nursing staff reads a newspaper with resident; dietary staff makes finger foods available; CNA works puzzle with the resident; maintenance staff take the resident on night rounds; and/or early morning delivery of coffee/juice to residents; Miscellaneous; Short-stay resident: “a la carte activities” are available, such as books, magazines, cards, word puzzles, newspapers, CDs, movies, and handheld games; interesting/contemporary group activities are offered, such as dominoes, bridge, Pinochle, poker, video games, movies, and travelogues; and/or individual activities designed to match the goals of therapy, such as jigsaw puzzles to enhance fine motor skills; Younger resident: individual and group music offerings that fit the resident’s taste and era; magazines, books and movies that fit the resident’s taste and era; computer and Internet access; and/or contemporary group activities, such as video games, and the opportunity to play musical instruments, card and board games, and sports Diverse ethnic or cultural backgrounds: special events that include meals, decorations, celebrations, or music; visits from spiritual leaders and other individuals of the same ethnic background; printed materials (newspapers, magazines) about the resident’s culture; and/or opportunities for the resident and family to share information about their culture with other residents, families, and staff. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org The NAPT- National Activity Professionals Training Course is written and taught by Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, DMDCP - NCCAP & NAAPCC Certified Educator. The Course Provides all the CE Requirements for Path 1&2 - NAAPCC Standards Do you have 1 year of experience in the past 3yr working with the elderly as an assistant, a director or other? Do you have a high school diploma or higher? Do you hate doing practicum lessons about tasks you have been doing for years? Do you have 8 weeks to take the National Activity Professional Training (NAPT) Class and pass the National Board Certification Exam? Do you have the MEPAP1 Course? It is accepted at the NAAPCC. Do you have money and time to throw away? If not, then the NAAPCC Activity Board Certification Path is for you! One Class, One exam, One National Board Certification. NAAPCC "The Affordable Choice" Contact NAAPCC.Office@gmail.com Phone: 303-317-5682 Let their counselors reassure you you're on the right Path to National Board Certification. "Your Experience Counts!" See if you qualify! Check NAAPCC Standards The certifications recognized under CMS F Tag 680 for Activity Professionals are the NAAPCC AP-BC & AC-BC, NCCAP ADC & ACC, CTRS, OTR, and COTA. NAAPCC Est. 2011, is the only Activity Credentialing Organization that follows the ICE, NCCA Standards for Accreditation. They are NON-Profit. Contact NAAPCC.Office@gmail.com Phone: 303-317-5682 Let their counselors reassure you you're on the right Path to National Board Certification "Your Experience Counts!" See if you qualify! Check NAAPCC Standards American Healthcare Association's Shelter in Place: Planning Resource Guide for Nursing Homes Keep Residents, Staff and Family Members up to date with this blank Covid-19 Newsletter Template. Made simply for your convenience: Step 1: Click on Button below Step 2: Fill in sections with your info. Step 3: Hit print or email. Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  16. Greg Bledsoe a Activity Director who now Operates 2 Foster Care Facilities ,is Launching a New YouTube Channel designed for Seniors. SENIOR TELEVISION CHANNEL Great Activity Idea .. lock down can be fun! Please check it out and give me some feedback. SeniorTelevisionChannel.com
  17. Hi.. we have a new CEU Author on Activitydirector.org/classroom, Gloria Hoffner, and she has written a course called "Science for Seniors" .. amazing stuff . If youre looking for a different type of Activity... this is the best Ive seen. Gloria has been doing Science projects for the elderly for years, she has books and how-to's and Now .. a NCCAP preApproved CE Course.. Check it out ... Please report back and share... thanks Pennie
  18. Visit this CNN Article to see exactly how a virus spreads among a crowd. A viral video from Japan aims to show how easily germs and viruses can spread in restaurants when just one person is infected. https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/13/health/japan-black-light-experiment-coronavirus-trnd-wellness/index.html
  19. I know you've had to cancel entertainers coming in, but we all know how important music and entertainment is for well being as well as a distraction. For that reason I have started a video series that will be available each week until we know what's going on with the virus. Each video series is me performing a concert for your residents online with fun backdrops and pictures. Each video is 45 minutes and you can watch them multiple times--there are no watch limits. New videos are added each Monday to keep variety in your entertainment. These videos series will be $50 each and available to you through a private link to YouTube that will be sent directly to you. I'm hoping this can help during this unusual time. We can share this with communities all over the United States, so let's share the joy! While the video series is Private and only for those that order, you can view a short video sample here https://youtu.be/0ukHDj520XY Jennifer Gilmore www.JenniferGilmoreSings.com YouTube.com/JenniferGilmoreSing 863-412-6697 --
  20. New Survey Guidelines for Nursing Facilities were issued April 19th Upcoming Requirements for Notification of Confirmed COVID-19 Among Residents and Staff ...more info
  21. Visit Website The American Healthcare Association invites you to share a message of support for our seniors. Click on the link below for more details and to see other's videos. Be sure and share some of these videos and stories with your residents so they know how much they are loved. LOVE is strengthening and healing. #CareNotCOVID Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  22. From what I read lately, it seems if we would all wear a mask, day in and day out we wouldn't catch the virus or spread it. just saying.. china stopped it completely in 60 days and now every citizen wears a mask, mandatory. They are all back to work and are not accepting people into their country without a quarantine.
  23. Fabric Glue.. is amazing.. back in the day, the craft shows were dominated by redesigned sweatshirts, flipped-over blue jean vest and flip-flops with every imaginable trinket glued to it. Fabric Glue would take the beating of washing and wearing.. Aleenes Fabric Glue , I used Gorilla Glue on several things and I think it would work good also.
  24. Here is a great Do It Yourself project. https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Cloth-Face-Mask/
  25. Here is a great resource put together by the NCCAP Click HERE for "Covid-19-activity-director-resources"
 
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