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  1. Celebrate Cartoonist Day on May 5th! There just may be a hidden cartoonist in us all! To celebrate Cartoonist Day we have created a FREE set of 4 blank cartoon pages for your residents to utilize. Invite your residents to create a comic or graphic shorts of any kind. It doesn't have to be superheroes and villains or Sunday morning funny.... everyday scenes can be depicted. This opens the door for more creative and varied stories to come forth in the work. Display the stories with permission. Click Below for a FREE Cartoonist Day Activity Pack! Free Cartoonist Day Pack May is Mystery Month! I love a good mystery! Chance are many of your residents do too! In honor of this month's theme, setup a Top Sleuth Contest utilizing the fantastic interactive website www.5minutemystery.com. How it Works: Setup a free account on www.5minutemystery.com. Select 31 different mysteries from the mystery archives and create a list for each participant. These are to be attempted in order, on a daily basis throughout the month of May. Print out the mystery for the day and hand it out to each resident. Instruct residents to circle the main clues in the story and then write their primary suspect down before turning it in to you at the end of each day. Check the answers through 5 Minute Mystery and keep a tally of each resident's progress. Optional- Create a public bulletin board with each resident and their ranking throughout the month. Throw a mystery themed party for the top 3 Sleuths and award them with a Top Sleuth award and gift. NOTE: If your residents have access to the internet, they can create their own accounts and attempt it online. By doing it this way, they can note their completion time as an added component of the competition. Simply have them attempt it once and mark their suspect and time. Check out the story below to get a feel for how it works. Check your answer by clicking the link below the story. Department Store Murder Written by Tom Fowler Source: www.5minutemystery.com Leon Adams clocked in a few minutes before 10:00 a.m. on a very mild and sunny Tuesday in April, as he was supposed to. It took only a few minutes to open the cash registers in the men’s department. Leon was a suit salesman and he knew from experience that the first couple of hours on a weekday would be very slow. Slow to the point of boredom. So, he was surprised when customers began to show up shortly after opening. The first to arrive was Ed Puckett, (Leon would introduce himself to all of the morning customers and learn their names). Leon greeted Ed as he entered the men’s area. Ed looked around and picked out a few suits to try on in the fitting room. Ed had not been back there long when Leon’s second customer, Louis Murphy, showed up at the cash register asking about a good deal on a sport coat and pair of slacks. Leon helped Louis in finding them and led him back to the fitting room. Meanwhile, Ed was still in the dressing room. Leon was pleased that he had two customers in his area so early -- it was only 10:20. Leon spotted Gene Roberts browsing the edge of the men’s area at 10:25, just after noticing that Ed had left the dressing room. What a busy day! It was difficult to keep track of so many customers. Leon could see Ed wandering in the shoe department, so he moved on to his next sale, greeting Gene and escorting him to the dress shirt table, all the while Louis examined himself in the fitting room’s full length mirror. He hoped Louis would like the sport coat and slacks he was trying on. Although he was some distance away from him, the garments appeared to be a good fit. Justin Tanner came in at 10:30 and asked Leon where the men’s sweaters were. Leon walked Justin over to the sweater table. Justin thanked him and said he wanted to pick one out to try on in the fitting room. As Justin was browsing the sweaters, Leon decided to check on Louis. As he walked back toward the fitting room, he saw Louis walk away from the mirror and return to his dressing room. It was only 10:36 and Leon was having an uncharacteristically busy weekday. At 10:45, Leon saw Justin enter the fitting room with a green sweater and Leon noticed that Louis was still in his dressing room. At 10:50 George Whitley walked over to Leon from the shoe department and asked about a catalog order. Leon placed the order for him at the cash register, but it took a few minutes and he did not finish with it until after 11:00. George paid for the order, which was a pair of dress slacks, and left. At 11:04, Leon noticed Justin leaving the men’s department. He had not purchased the sweater. At 11:10, Leon knew that Louis had never left his dressing room and went to check on him. When he found him, he received the shock of his life. Louis was dead on the floor with a knife wound in his heart. Blood covered the carpeting of the small fitting room. Mercifully, there were now no customers in the men’s department as Gene Roberts had left without trying anything on. Leon held on to his composure long enough to return to the cashier station and call the store security officer, Ronald Clay. Leon’s mouth was hot and dry as Ronald answered his phone, saying simply, “Clay speaking.” Leon stammered, “Ron, get over to the suit fitting room. A customer has been murdered.” Ronald was the retired detective Lieutenant Ronald Clay of the city police department. He came to work at the store after retiring from a 25-year career as a law enforcement officer. There wasn’t much that went on in the store that escaped his attention. Leon was grateful he was on duty and available to handle this nightmare. Clay quickly found the shocked Leon still standing at the cash register. Firmly, but gently, Ronald had Leon lead him to the deceased customer. As soon as Clay saw him he knew who it was. He said, “I know this guy. He’s Louis Murphy. I dealt with him and his friends quite a bit when I was on the Force. He’s known as ‘Louie the Lip’ and is a career mobster.” Weakly, Leon asked, “So you think another crook got to him?” “Yeah,’ Ron replied. “It’s too much of a coincidence for it not to be mob related.” Dryly, he added, “I’ve never seen a person murdered in a department store dressing room before, and I’ve seen a lot.” Within minutes, the store closed and a dozen police officers appeared on the scene. Clay knew that the key to solving the murder quickly rested with Leon, who always knew where men’s department customers were at any given time. Ronald led him back to his office for a quiet visit. He wanted to speak with him before his former associates did. After determining Leon was recovered sufficiently from the shock, he asked him to relate all of the morning’s activities he could remember. Leon remembered everything and relayed the activities and movements of the five customers in detail. Clay listened intently. After considering what he had been told, they went to the video room and reviewed the security tapes. After watching it a couple of times, Ronald told Leon, “This is the murderer.” Check Your Answer Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Celebrate Internat'l Hummus Day on May 13th! Hummus Cucumber Cups Makes 24 appetizers Written by AlwaysOrderDessert.Com Ingredients 2 English Cucumbers, cut into 1 1/2" thick rounds Kosher salt 1 10oz container hummus (or about 1 1/2 cups of your favorite homemade hummus) 1/2 cup pine nuts, toasted Finely minced parsley, for garnish Steps Use a melon baller or round measuring spoon... Get Full Recipe Below! Get Recipe Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  2. This recognition will take place May 9-15 and will honor the collaborative commitment of skilled nursing care facilities and their staff in providing compassionate care to their residents during these unprecedented times. Over the past year, despite the challenges of the current pandemic, skilled care centers and their staff have shown an incredible and steadfast commitment to providing quality care and ensuring the safety of their residents. This recognition does not come as a surprise given the daunting challenges that our front line “essential workers” have had to overcome to ensure the safety and well being of our residents. The week will focus on the collective efforts and the amazing strength and dedication of those who worked tirelessly each and every day to care for and protect the frail, elderly, and disabled adults in long term care. With each new season comes new beginnings, and together we will get to a place and time of healing. Why is it Important to Recognize Milestones Nevertheless, celebrating milestones along the path towards our goals is a crucial component of engagement. It helps honor the hard work folks are putting in, recognizing achieved goals, and simply creates a more positive environment. The intent to offer time to recognize these areas sprinkles coveted “positivity” throughout the facility for both residents and staff members. Milestones, whether personal or work-related, become inspiring memories that are needed to renew our energy supply and shouldn't go unrecognized. Celebrating achievements is a way for us to see how far we've come and can serve as our motivation should another challenge present itself. When recognition brings attention to efforts having a direct impact on the success of a company, it motivates staff and contributes to a sense of united celebratory reward that values the staff and honors resident well being. It also contributes greatly to meaningful organizational purpose. Programming Ideas Established by the American Health Care Association (AHCA) in 1967, NSNCW, formerly known as National Nursing Home Week, recognizes the essential role of skilled nursing care centers in caring for America’s frail, elderly, and disabled. This coming May, celebrate all members of your community and participate on social media using the hashtag #NSNCW. Below is a list of general activity ideas taken from the American Health Care Association/ National Center for Assisted Living: NOTE: At the time of publishing, care centers were following social distancing and other restrictions due to COVID-19. Please be sure to plan your activities through an infection prevention and control lens and modify them based on the latest guidelines as needed. Celebrate Together coordinates interactive games and raffles. Decorate and provide food to staff in celebration and appreciation of their efforts. If safe and guidelines allow, invite family members to share a meal with residents. Plan a themed dress-up day or a dance contest and offer prizes. Create Together Engage residents in creative art projects focused on the theme of the four seasons and togetherness. Coordinate a project that allows everyone to participate such as a fingerprint or button tree. Display all artwork in a “gallery” and invite staff members on a “gallery walk”. Reaching Out Together Find ways to connect to the wider community. Ask loved ones, members of the community, and/or local school groups to send feel-good notes, drawings, or video messages for residents and staff. Work with residents to create signs and messages of their own to share with loved ones. Enjoy Music Together Plan a concert or talent show and invite residents and staff with musical talents to share their gifts by playing or singing. Create personalized playlists for residents with dementia through the Music & Memory program. Music is the universal language and a great way to foster connections. https://www.ahcancal.org/Education-Events/Documents/NSNCW/NSNCW_2021_FINAL.pdf?csf=1&e=8EmyYh Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  3. View this email in your browser Listening to Understand Active Listening and Communications Instead of thinking about what you want to say while the resident is talking, really listen during the exchange of conversation. It is not uncommon to feel a need to be thinking ahead to formulating a response, particularly while multi-tasking. Picture this --- Someone is speaking to you, expressing their thoughts very carefully for you to understand. In this scenario, you need to be mindful of behavior that presents signs of the individual struggling to communicate his/her needs. To fully understand the meaning behind the words, you must focus on the intent and seek purposeful understanding of its meaning. All this needs to be first and foremost during the interaction and your main focus during every conversational exchange with your resident. The experts call this “active listening”, and there are a few different components: Pay attention. When someone is talking to you, look at them. Notice their eye contact and body language. Take in their tone of voice as well as what they are actually saying. Really listen. Listen with your body. Turn toward the person who is talking, lean in, and make them feel listened to because you really are listening. Make eye contact, smile, nod, and make leading noises (“Uh-huh”, “Really?”, “Go on”, etc.) when appropriate. Don’t interrupt. The best way to make someone feel like they are not being heard is to interrupt or talk on top of them. Listen fully and wait until they are done to ask questions or add your thoughts. Repeat what they said. Don’t just say what you were planning to say. Show that you have heard what they said by repeating back to them a summary of what you heard when appropriate before adding your own opinions. Respond to what they said. Be honest and respectful in your responses, and remember to talk — and listen — in the ways that you would want to be talked or listened to. Seven Quick Reference Active Listening Tips Older people may have trouble following rapid-fire questioning or torrents of information. By speaking more slowly, you will give them time to process what is being asked or said. If you tend to speak quickly, especially if your accent is different from what your residents are used to hearing, try to slow down. This gives them time to take in and better understand what you are saying. 1. Allow extra time for older patients. 2. Minimize visual and auditory distractions. 3. Sit face to face with the patient. 4. Don't underestimate the power of eye contact. 5. Listen without interrupting the patient. 6. Speak slowly, clearly but not necessarily loudly. 7. Use short, simple words and sentences. Be Careful About Language Some words may have different meanings to older patients than to you or your peers. Words may also have different connotations based on cultural or ethnic background. For example, the word “dementia” may connote insanity, and the word “cancer” may be considered a death sentence. Although you cannot anticipate every generational and cultural/ethnic difference in language use, being aware of the possibility may help you to communicate more clearly. Communication Barriers due to Disabilities Older adults can suffer from a variety of ailments that can disrupt their expressive and receptive communication. Evaluate the older adult to ensure that the person is able to hear, see or understand you. For individuals with hearing issues, make sure that you are facing them when you speak. This is particularly important with current mask wearing restrictions. Our residents often were previously reliant on reading your lips to fill in the gaps that may be caused by hearing deficits. Make sure to speak in a clearly and articulate each syllable. Enhance communications through body language. Be sure to partner your verbal communications with your residents by incorporating supportive body language. Actions can speak louder than words and your body sends volumes on that note. Speak in a calm tone and exercise good body posture so that your stance is inviting and open to enhance the message you wish to communicate. Utilization of specialized equipment can be one of the many ways to get past these barriers. Some individuals may have hearing aids so be sure that they are being used. If hearing aids are not available, there are amplifiers that can be purchased and utilized as well. For individuals who may not have the ability to speak, a communication board may be able to be utilized. Utilize communication boards, dry erase board or a note pad that can be written, large print if needed, to ensure accurate interpretation of the conversation. Images are particularly effective to communicate the intent of your message and has been reported to be effective with varied levels of cognitively compromised adults. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Enroll Now April 6th N.A.P.T. Nat'l Activity Professional Training for National Board Certification Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  4. View this email in your browser Fatigue in Older Adults Each and everyone one of us will find ourselves feeling tired from time to time but usually feeling refreshed after a solid night’s sleep. However, normal aging and related health concerns may contribute to sleeping difficulties known to result in unrelenting fatigue. Sometimes, fatigue can be the first sign that the body is experiencing some health issue. Many medical problems and treatments can add to fatigue included but not limited to: Taking certain medications, such as antidepressants, antihistamines, and medicines for nausea and pain management. Undergoing medical treatments, like chemotherapy and radiation, or recovering from major surgery. Fending off infections (Flu, bronchitis, etc.). Chronic diseases: diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, thyroid disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Rheumatoid arthritis; a painful condition that affects the joints, often complain of fatigue. Untreated or persistent pain and diseases like fibromyalgia. Diagnosed Anemia Sleep apnea and other sleep disorders Those afflicted with Cancer may battle fatigued from the disease progression, treatments, or both. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome *** What Is Chronic Fatigue Syndrome? Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) or ME/CFS, is a condition in which fatigue lasts 6 months or longer and is not related to other diseases or conditions. People with CFS experience symptoms that make it hard to do daily tasks like dressing or bathing. Along with severe fatigue that doesn’t get better with rest, CFS symptoms can include problems with sleep, memory and concentrating, pain, dizziness, sore throat, and tender lymph nodes. What Else Causes Fatigue? Some lifestyle habits may affect energy: Having too much caffeine. Drinking caffeinated drinks like soda, tea, or coffee late in the day can keep you from getting a good night's sleep. Limit the amount of caffeine you have during the day and avoid it in the evening. Commentary: Our residents LOVE what they LOVE to drink and eat and sometimes it is wise to indulge their cravings if it helps to increase nutritional intake for a resident that shows decreased interest in eating. Some of these cravings however, are bread out of habit/established patterns over the years and drinking that morning cup of Joe can leaned itself to an all day partaking. When that cup of coffee contains caffeine, enough of it may contribute to sleep disturbances. Consult with your nursing staff when you notice signs of fatigue to investigate if it stems from over caffeinated drinks. Getting too little or too much exercise. Regular exercise can boost your energy levels, but don’t overdo it. Commentary: Age progression may bring an increased challenge to remain as active as the individual may have been in younger days and may be due to illness, body decline due to the normal aging process or lifestyle changes. Regular physical activity may improve sleep. It may also help reduce feelings of depression and stress while improving mood and overall well-being. Almost anyone, at any age, can do some type of physical activity. Even moderate exercise may improve appetite, energy, and outlook. Some people find that exercises combining balance and breathing (for example, tai chi or yoga) improve your residents energy level during daytime hours to get a restful night’s sleep. NOTE: Consult with nursing staff/physical therapy to ensure that you meet the needs and limitations of your resident. Daytime Naps- Try to avoid long naps (over 30 minutes) late in the day. Long naps may cause unwanted grogginess during the daytime and may make it harder for your resident to fall asleep at night. You are charged with keeping your resident engaged during the daytime hours to help them more readily slip into those nighttime Zs. Can Emotions Cause Fatigue? Absolutely! Stress, anxiety, worry can take a toll on the soul (and the body) and we are seeing residents with more elevated emotions and unwanted behavior during the current pandemic. In addition, residents are sensing the loss of family and friends (due to social distancing) taking a toll on everyone and often depleting personal energy. Fatigue can be linked to many conditions, including: Anxiety Depression Grieving for loved ones or friends Loss of control Be on the lookout for resident fatigue and do what you all do best during the current pandemic and everyday throughout the year. https://www.sleepfoundation.org/aging-and-sleep https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/fatigue-older-adults Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  5. CMS Updates Nursing Home Guidance with Revised Visitation Recommendations The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), issued updated guidance today (March 10, 2021) for nursing homes to safely expand visitation options during the COVID-19 pandemic public health emergency (PHE). This latest guidance comes as more than three million doses of vaccines have been administered within nursing homes, thanks in part to the CDC’s Pharmacy Partnership for Long-Term Care Program, following the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) authorization for emergency use of COVID-19 vaccines. According to the updated guidance, facilities should allow responsible indoor visitation at all times and for all residents, regardless of vaccination status of the resident, or visitor, unless certain scenarios arise that would limit visitation for: Unvaccinated residents, if the COVID-19 county positivity rate is greater than 10 percent and less than 70 percent of residents in the facility are fully vaccinated; Residents with confirmed COVID-19 infection, whether vaccinated or unvaccinated, until they have met the criteria to discontinue transmission-based precautions; or Residents in quarantine, whether vaccinated or unvaccinated, until they have met criteria for release from quarantine. The updated guidance also emphasizes that “compassionate care” visits should be allowed at all times, regardless of a resident’s vaccination status, the county’s COVID-19 positivity rate, or an outbreak. Compassionate care visits include visits for a resident whose health has sharply declined or is experiencing a significant change in circumstances. CMS continues to recommend facilities, residents, and families adhere to the core principles of COVID-19 infection control, including maintaining physical distancing and conducting visits outdoors whenever possible. This continues to be the safest way to prevent the spread of COVID-19, particularly if either party has not been fully vaccinated. “CMS recognizes the psychological, emotional and physical toll that prolonged isolation and separation from family have taken on nursing home residents, and their families,” said Dr. Lee Fleisher, MD, CMS Chief Medical Officer and Director of CMS’ Center for Clinical Standards and Quality. “That is why, now that millions of vaccines have been administered to nursing home residents and staff, and the number of COVID cases in nursing homes has dropped significantly, CMS is updating its visitation guidance to bring more families together safely. This is an important step that we are taking, as we continue to emphasize the importance of maintaining infection prevention practices, given the continued risk of transmission of COVID-19.” High vaccination rates among nursing home residents, and the diligence of committed nursing home staff to adhere to infection control protocols, which are enforced by CMS, have helped significantly reduce COVID-19 positivity rates and the risk of transmission in nursing homes. Although outbreaks increase the risk of COVID-19 transmission, as long as there is evidence that the outbreak is contained to a single unit or separate area of the facility, visitation can still occur. For additional details on the updated nursing home visitation guidance released today, visit here: https://www.cms.gov/medicareprovider-enrollment-and-certificationsurveycertificationgeninfopolicy-and-memos-states-and/nursing-home-visitation-covid-19-revised A Fact Sheet can be found here: https://www.cms.gov/newsroom/fact-sheets/cms-updates-nursing-home-guidance-revised-visitation-recommendations https://www.cms.gov/newsroom/press-releases/cms-updates-nursing-home-guidance-revised-visitation-recommendations Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  6. View this email in your browser The Unsung Hero of Long Term Care Facilities The COVID-19 pandemic has come in like a lion (through infection); ruthlessly and relentlessly devouring the physical well being of the individual from which this disease takes claim. The other less recognized, less publicized, and profoundly less understood yet equally sinister devastation bestowed by this infection is the retaliatory affects of social isolation and other psychological stresses affecting our aging population living in nursing homes during this pandemic. In addition, the sudden onset of COVID-19 has unceremoniously and expeditiously eliminated the once familiar daily routines that residents have come to know and expect. The Challenges The impact of current pandemic related stressors and social isolation cannot be overstated. Facilities have justifiably but abruptly ended group stimulation, social interactions and temporarily paused self-directed choices that have been deemed necessary to reduce high risk infection spread for facility residents and the staff. Long Term Care Facilities’ residents suddenly and unexpectedly find themselves confined to their rooms without social dining, interest based group pursuits, and no longer allowed to have in-person family visits. Emotional disruptions of such magnitude may perpetuate mental health conditions such as, post-traumatic stress (PTSD), depression, loneliness and anxiety that may lead to life-threatening status and failure to thrive. Highly elevated emotional stressors may be detrimental to the functioning of the individuals’ immune system. Additionally, elevated loneliness, anxiety, and unrelenting fears may further lead to a number of deleterious consequences, such as high blood pressure, depression, and suicidal thoughts. The Unsung Heroes Claim Their Place Amongst the tenacious and dedicated nurses, doctors, and therapists is a member of the Interdisciplinary Team that goes unnoticed. These healthcare professionals work day in and day out in the midst of this pandemic to support the emotional health of our elderly population living in Long Term Care facilities. These are the Long Term Care nursing home “Unsung Heroes” of the Covid-19 epidemic. The nursing home Therapeutic Programming Professional takes responsibility for resident “engagement” and partners closely with the other IDT members in the continuum of care dedicated to delivering “whole health and wellness”. These professionals create facility programming intended to support the residents’ emotional well being which in turn, greatly helps to reduces imposed epidemic related stressors. Consequently, leading to better immunity and that is a “golden ticket” with unlimited value. These professionals focus on the residents’ personal interests and individualized needs. They create the pathway for each unique resident so they may continue enjoying the same leisure quality of life interests which they had previously come to treasure during their lifetime. Supporting the residents’ choice to continue enjoying deep roots preferences allows them to continue being connected to their personal identity well into aging years. The Spirit to Succeed One can only imagine the immense challenges brought on by the pandemic social distancing and mask infection control practices or the spirit and tenacity these professionals must draw upon to support and maintain resident connectivity at a time when imposed limitations curtail even the best of those well laid out plans. These programs may help residents spend time constructively, thereby decreasing loneliness and anxiety while maintaining social distancing. In addition, these trained professionals collaborate with the clinical staff and therapists to utilize clinical & psychology approved therapeutic approaches. Here are several suggestions to help reduce social isolation and improve engagement with residents: Non-group or solitary interventions, such as laughter therapy, horticultural therapy, and reminiscence therapy, can be more effective in reducing residents’ feelings of loneliness. Staff have transformed into surrogate family members with frequent and more lengthy contacts. Have them wear photos and name tags on top of their PPE. Regular video chats with family members facilitated by social work and/or therapeutic programming staff is essential. Regular telehealth visits should be provided by doctors and other therapists. Celebratory, fun, and interesting snacks, treats, and programming (e.g., music therapy) can be brought to the door, room, and bedside. Drive-thru family visits to the facility can be set up, using masks and social distancing. Offer in rooms stimulation via video and/or closed-circuit TV. We must remember that ALL front line caregivers are true heroes, facing daily stress that can be overwhelming for the benefit of those they serve. Heartfelt gratitude to every healthcare “Essential Personnel”! Whether in Long Term Care or Hospital Critical Care, it cannot be overstated that family members and close friends lack adequate words, in any language, that will sufficiently convey the level of gratefulness and thankfulness to those devoted nurses, doctors and therapist and Therapeutic Programming Professionals that remain dedicated despite potential exposure and personal risks. From each and everyone one of us! https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/the-impact-of-covid-19-on-mental-health-in-long-term-care-settings Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Buy Now We Proudly Support : Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  7. Subscribe Past Issues RSS Translate Check Out Our Bestsellers National Activity Professional Training Course (NAPT) Our 8 week training course meets APNCC's Continuing Education Requirements for Path 2 and includes up to 12 LIVE CE Hours. This course is designed to prepare you to pass the CMS Approved APNCC National Board Certification exam to become Activity Professional Board Certified (AP-BC). Learn More >> The Activity Directors Bible 2nd Ed. From start to finish this book will help you set up your department to make sure that the department is doing everything it needs to provide the quality of care that each resident requires. $55 Visit Store >> The Care Plan: A Road Map 10 CEs This course takes you through the Activity Departments required documentation process from the Baseline Care Plan through the final creation of the Comprehensive Care Plan. Enroll Now>> Find us online Want to be social with us? Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. view this email in your browser Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC, All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 West Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351 Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
  8. Not only is it the month of LOVE, but it is also Heart Health Month! Today we will focus on some of the ways you can promote heart health in your facility. Below is a great article from Total Wellness Health that incorporates some action steps that you can take within your facility to celebrate. Who knows, one of these action steps just might save someone's life. 5 Ways to Celebrate American Heart Month By Seraine Page Source: TotalWellnessHealth.Com February is American Heart Month, which presents a great opportunity to spread awareness about heart disease throughout the workplace. Every year, heart disease kills 1 in 4 people. Heart disease is also known as coronary heart disease or coronary artery disease. Over time, “plaque” builds up in the arteries that take blood to the heart. What causes plaque? ● Smoking ● High blood pressure ● Too much fat and cholesterol in the blood ● Too much sugar in the blood The great news is this chronic, deadly disease can be avoided when people make healthy lifestyle choices while managing other health conditions. By spreading awareness like heart health facts and the major signs of a heart attack, employers give workers potentially life-saving tools. Hearts will be everywhere in February. Take advantage of all the love talk to circle around to matters of the heart, including a healthy heart. Ready to show some heart love? Here’s 5 ideas to celebrate American Heart Month: 1. Host a Quit Smoking Day Give away gift cards to employees who quit smoking on a designated day in February. It may only be one day, but if an employee is willing to try it, they may continue the trend. Quitting smoking improves breathing, blood pressure, and oxygen levels — all necessities for a healthy heart. Action step: Have employees planning to quit write their names on a bulletin board for the quit smoking day. It will bring staffers together who have a common goal in mind, and it allows accountability partnerships to develop. Encourage non-smokers to write encouraging notes on the board, too. 2. Give Your Heart Away Give away items that are cute and heart-related. A heart-shaped pen or a heart stress ball with a note of attached heart health facts are fun ways to spread awareness. Action step: Send out Valentine’s cards with heart healthy facts to every employee. It’s an affordable and memorable way to share heart disease information. 3. Sweat it Out As an entire staff, dedicate one day a week to workout together for all of February. It’s a short month anyways, so even gym haters can try out working out short-term in the name of a healthier ticker. The habit may even turn into an activity they enjoy instead of loathe. Action step: Ask an employee to coordinate each week’s physical fitness activities. It doesn’t have to be expensive. Head to the local park for a walk, or set up a Stairmaster challenge within your company’s stairwell. 4. Wear Red Raise awareness about heart disease by wearing the color red. Every Friday, have your entire staff wear various shades of red. Action step: To get into the team spirit, have shirts created with facts about heart disease on the back of the T-shirt. If you host a fundraiser to donate proceeds to a foundation like the American Heart Association, wear your shirts during the event to spread additional awareness. 5. Spread the Word The more you share, the more people will learn about heart disease and its lasting impacts on health. Knowledge is power, and the more your employees know, the better off they'll be. Action step: There are plenty of ways to get the word out. Share heart health facts in your monthly newsletter. Use #HeartMonth to tweet about American Heart Month on your company account. Host a cardiologist for a lunch and learn, and provide a heart-healthy meal catered by dieticians. Have a Little Heart to Heart With Employees Serious topics don't have to be boring. Bring some heart to your American Heart Month awareness campaign, and employees are unlikely to forget the importance heart health. All five of the ideas to celebrate American Heart Month above are doable for companies of any size. Early action is critical for heart attack victims, and knowing the warning signs increases the chances of survival when emergency treatment happens fast. By sharing details like warning signs and symptoms and prevention measures, you’ll give your employees information that could one day save their life. Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Checkout these worksheets from Dr. Oz. Hand them out to your residents and co-workers. Information is power. Print Dr. Oz Worksheets Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Buy Now Cinnamon Sweet Tortilla Chips with Fruit Salsa Source: Heart.Org Servings: 8 Serving Size: 6 tortilla chips and ¼ cup salsa Ingredients Cooking spray 2 teaspoons olive oil 12 drops cinnamon-flavored liquid stevia sweetener ½ packet stevia sweetener or ¼ teaspoon stevia sweetner 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon salt 8 6-inch corn tortillas, each cut into 6 wedges 1 medium orange, peeled and diced ½ cup diced mango (from ½ of a medium mango)... Click Button Below to get Full Recipe Heart.Org Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Source: The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  9. Recognizing you... National Activity Professionals Week is January 24-30, 2021 National Activity Professionals Day was first celebrated on January 27th, 1984 to recognize all the activity professionals who care and develop interest and needs based programming for active seniors in Long Term Care nursing homes and other elder care facilities all around the country. What is Recognition? Recognition is a means for an organization, business, or specific industry to honor and support the contributions made by an individual or group achievements. It conveys appreciation and acknowledges the undaunted efforts and drive of that individual or group of individuals has not gone unnoticed. Recognition may be bestowed publicly or privately yet the value of this one small mention often matters more than that weekly paycheck. Recognition helps employees build a sense of security in their unique and individualized value to the company; often motivating them to continue their great work. Recognition matters: From a very early age, we crave recognition from parents, teachers, and friends. So strong is our desire for positive affirmation, particularly during developmental periods, that we can even perceive a lack thereof as a negative unspoken message. This continues to hold true as we move into the workplace. Motivated workers put more time and effort into their work, as they feel they have a purpose and play an important role in the company. Employee recognition helps to: Retain top talent thus, reducing staff turnover Increase employee engagement and motivation Elevate and encourage high performance Recognition is especially meaningful this year The Bigger Picture Who could have imagined the level of demand and the overdrive of dedication needed from our healthcare professionals this year? The very nature of the work these professionals commit to, under normal circumstances, is a huge undertaking, but current events have created an unimaginable workload that has caused many of us to forge ahead on autopilot; leaving the trauma to be dealt with at a later date. It’s clear that this infectious disease has created hardships on many levels, whether they are personal, economic, or financially related. Though some industries have experienced lower demand prompting layoffs, the healthcare industry has experienced the opposite problem. Healthcare workers have felt immense strain as increased demand has led to equipment shortages, working overtime, and sacrificed well-being to help those in need. Some healthcare institutions have had an especially rough time. We are now seeing the operations of many long-term care facilities, such as nursing homes and retirement homes, breaking down as outbreaks occur in these institutions. These facilities are home to the most vulnerable - our precious aging population. Indeed it takes a very special soul with immense compassion such that the average human being cannot comprehend. This year, the current pandemic has asked more from these professionals each and every day. So this past week we are reminded to give praise and appreciation to our healthcare professionals diligently working to maintain “infection control” standards while reinventing creative facility programming to optimize the quality of life and well being of the residents they serve. It seems more imperative and especially fitting to recognize these “essential care” professionals in lieu of the very challenging and unprecedented past year. THIS YEAR . . . Recognition is neither about promotional offers nor the variety of exclusive employee appreciation gifts. It’s not about the flowers gift sets, mug gift sets, appreciation treat sets; etcetera, etcetera! Senior care programming professionals have sacrificed personal safety for the sake of those they serve and are rightly claiming their place in the health care industry. Activity professionals have “come into their own” and have made their mark in the industry of healthcare. Activity professionals have faced the current challenges to combat resident loneliness while ensuring cognitive engagement and safety– more than any previous year before. Thank You – Each and every one of you deserve the upmost recognition for your demonstrated dedication, tenacity and determination – you have arrived and have earned your place alongside all your health care counterparts. You have secured your place amongst the clinical staff, therapists, social workers, and physicians that care plan for our unique and individualized residents needs and sit proudly as a member of that elite group of “continuum of care” professionals known as the (IDT) Interdisciplinary Team members. In honor of today's Activity Consultant's Help Desk Topic, we wish to honor our wonderful instructor and author of the Help Desk, M. Celeste Chase. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  10. Celebrate Feed the Birds Day on February 3rd Our residents are spending a great deal of time in their rooms due to COVID restrictions and loneliness is likely. Bird watching out one's window is a natural result from this heightened alone time. Residents have long loved the interaction between animals of all sorts around the care home. Studies have proven the effectiveness of creating an environment in care homes that is inclusive of all kinds of animal interactions. A way that we can help connect our residents with the nature that surrounds them is by hanging bird feeders outside of each window. Of course, it is not feasible to buy a bird feeder for every window, so the solution is to enlist your residents to help with this fun activity. You may want to create a feeding schedule to make sure you have a dependable rotation to keep the birds interested and around. You should also plan to make extras for the residents that aren't able to participate but would benefit from the bird interaction outside their windows. How To Make A Teacup Bird Feeder Source: https://www.practicallyfunctional.com/how-to-make-a-teacup-bird-feeder/ Here’s what you need to make your own teacup bird feeder: an old teacup and saucer ceramic glue (I recommend either E6000 craft adhesive or DAP clear silicone adhesive) twine birdseed a bird feeder hanger Start by gluing the teacup to the saucer. Place a line of glue on the teacup from the rim to the bottom, exactly opposite the handle. Then, holding the teacup by the handle, press the cup down into the saucer. Make sure the cup is at the back half of the saucer so there is room for the birdseed to “spill out”... Read Full Tutorial By Clicking Below Practically Functional Tutorial Celebrate National Inventor's Day on February 11th with this FREE Printable from Worksheets-to-Print.com Free Worksheets-to-Print Printable Celebrate National Margarita Day on February 22nd Many of our residents may not drink, but perhaps they still love and miss the unique flavor of a margarita! Just because alcohol has lost its appeal for some doesn't mean this drink needs to be retired. Make this fun non-alcoholic mocktail to celebrate National Margarita Day! Make a cart up around it and fill it with chips, salsa and guacamole! Margarita Mocktail Recipe Source: LizonCall.Com Yields: 4 Servings Ingredients 2 cups limeade 3/4 cup orange juice 1/4 cup simple syrup 1/2 – 1 cup club soda Sugar and coarse salt for rim Limes for garnish Ice Instructions In a small pitcher, mix together limeade, orange juice and simple syrup... Get Full Recipe Below LizonCall Mocktail Damon Jones and Sheryl Bacon Jones, 2/14/09 February is National Weddings Month! Celebrate by having residents and co-workers bring in their wedding photos to display in the facility. Have participants share a story or important detail from their wedding with you and include some of the photos and information in your newsletter so that everyone can be involved. I have shared mine here to kick things off. An interesting detail about my wedding day is that I wore white knee-high Converse tennis shoes under my dress and it ended up raining cats and dogs. By the end of the outdoor ceremony, my shoes and dress were stained red from all of the clay in the dirt. I ended up celebrating my wedding day in blue jeans, a tank top, and a hoodie that said BRIDE in crystals! Buy Now WE Proudly Support ---- Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  11. Memory, Forgetfulness, and Aging: What's Normal and What's Not? In general as we age, we begin to notice and worry about memory and how aging may or may not change our cognitive abilities. For example, we might forget to pay the bills or find ourselves unintentionally leaving a boiling pot of water on the burner. Such instances can be upsetting but are often considered to be “mild forgetfulness” that is often a normal part of aging. Facility Programming What's the difference between normal, age-related forgetfulness and a serious memory problem? When memory related issues prevent the individual from attending to everyday tasks that are required to maintain a self-sufficient independent lifestyle, it may indicate further investigation. Signs may include: Repeating the same questions over and over again Confusion in familiar places Inability to proceed independently from task to task in sequential order Disorientation concerning time, people, and places Mild Cognitive Impairment Some older conditions known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), relate to memory deficits that are not in keeping with common aging related problems. However, individuals with MCI can usually take care of themselves and do their normal activities. MCI may be an early alert warning that points to Alzheimer’s disease, but not everyone with MCI will develop Alzheimer's. Signs of MCI include: Misplacing or losing things more frequently Not recalling important events or appointments Presenting with “aphasia” (difficulty with word finding) more than other individuals of the same age Diagnosed instances of MCI, are tracked every six to 12 months to document changes in memory and other thinking skills over time. Dementia and Aging I often am asked about Dementia. There is a great deal of confusion on the topic. To be clear, Dementia is not a normal part of aging. Dementia is not in of itself a disease. Instead, it's a group of symptoms caused by other conditions. Dementia is a group of conditions characterized by impairment of at least two brain functions, such as memory loss and judgment. Many things can cause dementia. It happens when the parts of the brain used for learning, memory, decision making, and language are damaged or diseased. Symptoms include forgetfulness, limited social skills, and thinking abilities so impaired that it interferes with daily functioning. Medications and therapies may help manage symptoms. Some causes of dementia are reversible. While there are different forms of Dementia, Alzheimer's disease is the most common disease associate with Dementia for those over the age 65. There are a number of other diseases and circumstances presenting with dementia affecting both young and old. The most common causes of Dementia include: Degenerative neurological diseases. These include Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and some types of multiple sclerosis. These diseases are progressive, get worse over time. Vascular disorders. These conditions affect the blood circulation in the brain. Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) caused by car accidents, falls, concussions, etc. More recently presenting in football athletes (Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy – CTE). Infections of the central nervous system. These include meningitis, HIV, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Long-time alcohol or drug use Certain types of hydrocephalus, a buildup of fluid in the brain. NOTE: Hydrocephalus is a condition in which an accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs within the brain. This typically causes increased pressure inside the skull. Older people may have headaches, double vision, poor balance, urinary incontinence, personality changes, or mental impairment. Source: https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/memory-forgetfulness-and-aging-whats-normal-and-whats-not https://www.webmd.com/alzheimers/types-dementia#1 This chart explains some differences between normal signs of aging and Alzheimer's. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  12. Unlike the Calendar method, on this type of participation record just records the participation using the 17 choices of activities available each. 31 days across the top, 17 activity types down the side. You will not know what activity was attended without have a Activity Calendar to reference. So for example you have a sheet for resident Tom Jones Bed Bound Cognitively Impaired, you would use the RV-Sensory Stim "S" rows to record his sensory activities, massage, aroma, music record the Response using the "S" responses in the S Stim row on the correct day. Nov 2020 1st Sunday RV so in the square you would put S-1 or s-12 for the response. On the 3rd you could put use Room Visit-Other put 15 for family visit under 1hr but for others you may put group activity on the 14th put an A for active. Look on the calendar if you want to know what the group activity was. If you have several groups activities, use the Independent row, next to the independent put a dash and A/R to indicate it was a independent out of room activity or put Bingo. Its good once you learn the method, its hard to teach. It was designed for one AD in a busy situation . The participation records are more for your documentation , progress notes and such. You retreat to your office to dis-cipher your notes and write your care plans and progress notes from them. We developed the Calendar Method to make it easier for the surveyor. We only kept 3 months worth in reach, and the surveyor would only ask for 3-4 residents. The faster they could envision the activity routine thru my paperwork the faster they would leave. Documentation is the art of painting a situation with words. Care planning is the art of creating a routine where improvement or decline can be easily measured. hope this helps
  13. This is a different style. Try this one... The downloads are under the Community heading on the menu.
  14. Visit our Newsletter Archives We Proudly Support the APNCC Activity Professionals National Credentialing Center! Heart Valentines Day Pop Up Card Source: https://www.easypeasyandfun.com/heart-valentines-day-pop-up-card/ Materials: Scissors Glue Cardstock paper Colored paper Directions Start by folding the cardstock to create a card base. Cut a colored paper with the same size of your card and fold... Click button below for full directions, along with step by step pics! Visit Website FREE Printable Back in the time of the feast of Lupercalia, entrees were understandably quite different. It is said emperors ate exotic things like giraffe and flamingo. We won't be suggesting you serve giraffe here, but we wish to offer inspiration for your foray into Roman foods. Below is a link to more obtainable Roman recipes for you to try with your residents in honer of Valentine's roots. First, let's explore a little bit more about the food culture in Roman times. Roman Flavors Roman food was heavily reliant on fish sauce for its success. Wine, honey, vinegar, oil, and fish sauce are combined to create a balance of sweet, sour, and salty. Sample Roman Banquet Menu Appetizers Jellyfish and eggs Sow's udders stuffed with salted sea urchins Patina of brains cooked with milk and eggs Boiled tree fungi with peppered fish-fat sauce Sea urchins with spices, honey, oil, and egg sauce Main Courses Fallow deer roasted with onion sauce, rue, Jericho dates, raisins, oil, and honey Boiled ostrich with sweet sauce Turtledove boiled in its feathers Roast parrot Dormice stuffed with pork and pine kernels Ham boiled with figs and bay leaves, rubbed with honey, baked in pastry crust Flamingo boiled with dates Desserts Fricassee of roses with pastry Pitted dates stuffed with nuts and pine kernels, fried in honey Hot African sweet-wine cakes with honey A firsthand account of the food served at one of Emperor Nero's "simple" meals. "After a generous rubdown with oil, we put on dinner clothes. We were taken into the next room where we found three couches drawn up and a table, very luxuriously laid out, awaiting us. We were invited to take our seats. Immediately, Egyptian slaves came in and poured ice water over our hands. The starters were served. On a large tray stood a donkey made of bronze. On its back were two baskets, one holding green olives, and the other black. On either side were dormice, dipped in honey and rolled in poppy seed. Nearby, on a silver grill, piping hot, lay small sausages. As for wine, we were fairly swimming in it." - Gaius Petronius (27-66), advisor to Emperor Nero in matters of luxury and extravagance. Source: https://delishably.com/world-cuisine/ancient-food-rome Six Ancient Roman Recipes 1943 Whitmore Chocolate Ad Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  15. View this email in your browser Celebrating you and all the hard wok you do is the perfect way to kickstart 2021! You have likely worked harder, longer and stretched yourself thinner than ever before this past year. You nailed it and now it is time to reflect upon your accomplishments and do a little celebrating! How Do You Celebrate Activity Professional's Week? One idea is to educate others about the profession and to build a sense of camaraderie and teamwork throughout the facility through this knowledge. Other ways include fun and career building activities. Some ideas you can use to accomplish this will be the focus of today's Activity Corner! *Activity Idea Career Swap A great way to educate others about what you do, is to let them do it! Celebrate Activity Professional's Day by having some volunteers from your facility step in and host each of your planned activities for the day. Directions: Have co-workers volunteer to host one of your planned activities for the day. You can decide how many activities to swap for based on the type of activity and willingness. During the planned activity, you will take over their job while they host your activity! Be sure and let everyone know beforehand. It will certainly peek everyone's interest and may even garner a higher attendance rate for the activity! Certification Checklist Why not celebrate by advancing in your career? You may be closer to being eligible for national certification than you even realize! Becoming Nationally Board Certified with APNCC (formerly known as NAAPCC) puts your career in the fast lane and provides opportunities for growth that are actually within reach. “ The industry’s mark of excellence recognized by CMS.” Step-by-Step Guide to Get Certified” for APNCC Board Certification Step 1 - Prepare Your Documentation Depending on your Pathway, you will need to gather corresponding documents to submit with your application. Below are some helpful forms for this purpose: Determine Your Pathway and Complete Your APNCC Application: • APNCC Pathways • APNCC Applications NOTE: If you have a college degree you may be able to apply for Advanced Activity Professional Board Certification. Check your credentials closely to determine where you fall. • Activity Experience Hours Verification Form Continuing Education You will have received your Live CE Continuing Education certificates throughout your NAPT Course by participating in Live Chats. If you are not enrolled in the NAPT course, you will need to obtain this through APNCC approved sources. Collect them together to send with your application. High School Diploma/GED/College Degree Your Pathway will determine which of these documents will need to be presented with your application. Determine what is needed and get a copy on hand. NAPT Course Certificate of Completion This will be awarded to you upon your successful completion of your course. It features a Seal of Authenticity from Activity Directors Network and will be signed by your instructor. *Note: THE NAPT course is not required for all certification pathways. For example, if you have a Bachelor's Degree you will not need to take the NAPT course. Once you have your application completed and your documentation together, you will then mail everything to APNCC at: APNCC 17840 Weymouth Avenue Parker, CO 80134-7775 USA Step 2 - Register for Your APNCC Board Certification Exam Visit https://apncc.org and register for your exam. You will then receive a code that you can enter when you are ready to begin. The exam is one and a half hours long and 150 questions. Educate Using Signage The truth is, many people don't know or understand exactly what it is that an Activity Professional does. This can be somewhat frustrating, but it also leaves a giant opportunity for us to educate others and motivate deeper working relationships. A good way to educate is with signage. Take time to create some bulletin board displays that offer information about the profession. To get you started, print out the FREE printable sign below. Include this on your bulletin board or offer as a handout during Activity Professional's Week. Want More? We have created a beautiful set of 6 Decorative Signs which highlight the importance of the Activity Professional and the ways they enhance the quality of life for each resident. Scroll down to purchase your pack and get ready for Activity Professional's Week! Print FREE Sign Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  16. Send your cards to Village at Sugar Land 140 Eldridge Suite H Sugar land Texas 77478 They will make sure they get passed out and distributed to the community.
  17. View this email in your browser In honor of diversity, I wish to introduce you to one of the world's most memorable Christmas characters, Caga Tio (pronounce Cacka-tee-oh). Caga Tio hails from Spain and carries Christmas cheer with him...that is until he poops it out on Christmas! Let me explain. Tio means uncle or log and Caga means poo. So, Caga Tio is essentially a Poo-Log! Kids in Spain begin caring for their Caga Tio December 8th (the day of the immaculate conception) by covering him with a blanket each night and feeding him orange peel and tarron. The better they take care of him and feed him, the more presents he will poop out for Christmas. The fun doesn't stop there either. On Christmas eve the children get sticks and beat Caga Tio while singing the Caga Tio song. Afterwards they run away and hide while their parents hide presents under Caga Tio's blanket. When the kids return they find what Caga Tio has pooped out for them! You just can't make this stuff up, but you can have residents make their very on Caga Tio to send to their grandchildren with a small explanation of how to care for him. How to Create Your Own Caga Tio: Find a small log and glue two twigs on the front to act as front legs. Place a red Christmas style hat (known as a Red Barretina cap) on his head and add eyes, a nose that sticks out and a beaming smile. You can add other elements if you wish, such a a pipe. In Spain, parents generally make several of them in ascending size to replace when the children are asleep to show how big Caga Tio is getting from being cared for. The better care that is taken, the bigger Caga Tio gets and the more presents he can eventually poop! Source: https://corinnabsworld.com/2017/12/christmas-catalonia-caga-tio.html https://www.barcelonayellow.com/barcelona-christmas-articles/625-caga-tio-christmas-log-tradition-and-song Many of our facilities are full of diversity, culture and various traditions important to each resident. Christmas is no different. While many cultures may utilize a Christmas tree in their celebrations, the decorations and even size of the tree itself, varies based on location. How about setting up different tress, decorated according to country, around your facility to help celebrate our diversity? If you have residents from other pats of the world, enlist their help in setting up the tee that represents their country. This is a beautiful way to help bring residents and staff together at a time when we all desperately need one another for a little moral support. Below is a summary of Christmas Tree protocol from around the world. Click the button below the article to read the full article. Mexico In most Mexican homes the principal holiday adornment is el Nacimiento (Nativity scene). However, a decorated Christmas tree may be incorporated in the Nacimiento or set up elsewhere in the home. As purchase of a natural pine represents a luxury commodity to most Mexican families, the typical arbolito (little tree) is often an artificial one, a bare branch cut from a copal tree (Bursera microphylla) or some type of shrub collected from the countryside. Greenland Christmas trees are imported, as no trees live this far north. They are decorated with candles and bright ornaments. Brazil Although Christmas falls during the summer in Brazil, sometimes pine trees are decorated with little pieces of cotton that represent falling snow. Sweden Evergreen trees are decorated with stars, sunbursts, and snowflakes made from straw. Other decorations include colorful wooden animals and straw centerpieces. Norway When Christmas Eve arrives, there is the decorating of the tree, usually done by the parents behind the closed doors of the living room, while the children wait with excitement outside. A Norwegian ritual known as “circling the Christmas tree” follows, where everyone joins hands to form a ring around the tree and then walk around it singing carols. Afterwards, gifts are distributed. Spain A popular Christmas custom is Catalonia, a lucky strike game. A tree trunk is filled with goodies and children hit at the trunk trying to knock out the hazel nuts, almonds, toffee, and other treats. Italy In Italy, the presepio (manger or crib) represents in miniature the Holy Family in the stable and is the center of Christmas for families. Guests kneel before it and musicians sing before it. The presepio figures are usually hand-carved and very detailed in features and dress. The scene is often set out in the shape of a triangle. It provides the base of a pyramid-like structure called the ceppo. This is a wooden frame arranged to make a pyramid several feet high. Several tiers of thin shelves are supported by this frame. It is entirely decorated with colored paper, gilt pine cones, and miniature colored pennants. Small candles are fastened to the tapering sides. A star or small doll is hung at the apex of the triangular sides. The shelves above the manger scene have small gifts of fruit, candy, and presents. The ceppo is in the old Tree of Light tradition which became the Christmas tree in other countries. Some houses even have a ceppo for each child in the family. Germany Many Christmas traditions practiced around the world today started in Germany...legend says that in the early 16th century, people in Germany combined two customs that had been practiced in different countries around the globe. The Paradise tree (a fir tree decorated with apples) represented the Tree of Knowledge in the Garden of Eden. The Christmas Light, a small, pyramid-like frame, usually decorated with glass balls, tinsel and a candle on top, was a symbol of the birth of Christ as the Light of the World. Changing the tree’s apples to tinsel balls and cookies and combining this new tree with the light placed on top, the Germans created the tree that many of us know today. Modern Tannenbaum (Christmas trees) are traditionally decorated in secret with lights, tinsel and ornaments by parents and then lit and revealed on Christmas Eve with cookies, nuts and gifts under its branches. South Africa Christmas is a summer holiday in South Africa. Although Christmas trees are not common, windows are often draped with sparkling cotton wool and tinsel. Saudi Arabia Christian Americans, Europeans, Indians, Filipinos, and others living here have to celebrate Christmas privately in their homes. Christmas lights are generally not tolerated. Most families place their Christmas trees somewhere inconspicuous. Philippines Fresh pine trees are too expensive for many Filipinos, so handmade trees in an array of colors and sizes are often used. Star lanterns, or parol, appear everywhere in December. They are made from bamboo sticks, covered with brightly colored rice paper or cellophane, and usually feature a tassel on each point. There is usually one in every window, each representing the Star of Bethlehem. China Of the small percentage of Chinese who do celebrate Christmas, most erect artificial trees decorated with spangles and paper chains, flowers, and lanterns. Christmas trees are called “trees of light.” Japan For most of the Japanese who celebrate Christmas, it’s purely a secular holiday devoted to the love of their children. Christmas trees are decorated with small toys, dolls, paper ornaments, gold paper fans and lanterns, and wind chimes. Miniature candles are also put among the tree branches. One of the most popular ornaments is the origami swan. Japanese children have exchanged thousands of folded paper “birds of peace” with young people all over the world as a pledge that war must not happen again. Source: https://www.history.com/topics/christmas/history-of-christmas-trees Read Full Article The Chocolate Salami is a Christmas staple in Italy. Don't be fooled by the name, though. There is no meat in this recipe! Chocolate Dessert Salami By: The Food Network Yield:6-8 Servings Ingredients 1/2 cup slivered almonds (2 1/2 ounces) 1/2 cup chopped walnuts (2 1/2 ounces) Two 5 inch long plain biscotti, coarsely crushed 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces, at room temperature One 12-ounce bag semisweet chocolate chips, such as Ghirardelli 1/4 cup brewed coffee 1 teaspoon grated orange zest (about 1/2 medium orange) 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar Directions Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spread the almonds, walnuts and crushed biscotti in a single layer on a baking sheet. Bake until the nuts are lightly toasted, 6 to 8 minutes. Cool completely. Put the butter and chocolate in a heatproof medium bowl and place the bowl over a pan of barely simmering water. Stir until the chocolate has melted and the mixture is smooth, about 6 minutes. Stir in the coffee until smooth. Add the almonds, walnuts, biscotti pieces and orange zest, and stir until combined. Cover the bowl and refrigerate until firm but moldable, 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Divide the chocolate mixture in half. Place half of the mixture in the center of an 18-inch-long piece of plastic wrap. Using a spatula, form the mixture into a log, about 7 inches long and 2 inches in diameter. Roll up the log in the plastic and twist the ends to seal. Roll back and forth on a work surface a few times to make the log evenly round. Repeat with the remaining chocolate mixture. Refrigerate the logs until firm, about 1 hour. Spread the confectioners' sugar on a dinner plate. Remove the plastic wrap from the logs, then roll them in the sugar until coated. Using a pastry brush, brush away the excess sugar. Let the logs sit at room temperature for 15 minutes. Using a sharp serrated knife, cut the logs into 1/2-inch-thick slices and serve. Cook's Note: The dessert can be frozen for up to 1 month. Thaw at room temperature for 25 minutes before slicing. Source: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/chocolate-dessert-salami-recipe-2107416 Noma Lights Ad Circa 1940 Enroll Now! NAPT Certification Classes start December 1st Visit ActivityDirector.org to Enroll! Over 310 New AD's This Year! ENROLL NOW! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  18. Celebrate Christmas Card Day December 9th This is the day to get all those Christmas cards sent off into the world to spread good cheer! You may need to host an activity prior to this to make sure each resident has Christmas cards to send or help them get their cards ordered or purchased. Spend December 9th helping residents fill out, address and mail off their cards. Play Christmas carols, serve a warm festive beverage and Christmas treats, and make a day of it! 48-Pack Christmas Card Bulk Box Set – Holiday Greeting Cards in 6 Cozy Christmas Season’s Greetings Designs with Kraft Envelopes, 4 x 6 Inches Amazon $11.99 Celebrate National Chocolate Covered Anything Day December 16th Time to load up your cart with the good stuff! Everyone loves chocolate, so why not have a little fun with it? On National Chocolate Covered Anything Day, you can create a cart with many food items dipped in chocolate. This works perfectly for food items that you may already have on hand. Below is list of possibilities. Pick what makes the most sense for you, your residents, your budget and your setup. Be sure you serve some milk on the side! Chocolate Covered Possibilities: Peanut Butter Crackers Nutter Butters Oreos Apple Wedges Sweet Potato Chips Strawberries Banana Slice Nuts Churros Pretzels Popcorn Candied Fruit Waffles Variations*: If you have adventurous residents, you may want to create a cart full of unusual chocolate covered food items from around the world. Check out the paraphrased article below for some wacky ideas. 20 Most Unusual Chocolate-Covered Foods From Around The World By Joey Haverford Aug 09, 2018 Source: TheTravel.Com 20. Squid- Chocolate and salty seafood is a tough sell, but it sells just the same! 19. Worms- Served in quite a few places around the world. 18. Onions- Served in Philadelphia candy shops. 17. Slim Jims- This has a small following, mostly limited to Slim Jim aficionados. 16. Lemons- Cherries and strawberries are among the most popular chocolate covered foods int eh world. Lemon is considered one of the most bizarre fruits to dip. 15. Cheerios- One of the tastier options on the list. 14. Chickpeas- This chocolate covered healthy snack is fast becoming more and more popular around the world. 13. Seaweed- This is sold in Korea, but isn't very popular other places. 12. Mushrooms- Created by Justin Cournoyer, a Toronto chef. 11. Bacon- Chocolate covered bacon is one of the top unique food items offered. 10. Carrots- Carrots are on the sweeter side, making them a better fit than most other veggies. 9. Scorpions- Multiple places all over the world serves these as an unusual snack. 8. Edamame- This snack is growing in popularity among healthy eaters. 7. Pickles- Typically on a stick while dipped into chocolate and covered with sprinkles. 6. Potato Chips- Seems like a snack food match made in heaven. 5. Crickets- Believed to be a great source of protein more sustainable than beef or pork. Like scorpions, these are eaten around the world. 4. Broccoli- Broccoli is often being coated in things to make it tastier. Chocolate is one of the wildest ideas out there for it. 3. Cheetos- May not be a huge hit, but recipes are out there for the creative food types. 2. Jalapenos- A combination of a super spicy item and a super sweet item could lead to a horrible result. Proceed with cation. 1. Corn dogs- Likely invented at a carnival or fair. Read Full Article Borden's Egg Nog Ad Circa December 28th, 1954 Celebrate National Egg Nog Day December 24th Enroll Now! ENROLL NOW! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  19. View this email in your browser There is a good chance that your facility will be hosting a very different Thanksgiving this year. Perhaps visitation is completely out the window all together. This means your residents are going to be feeling incredibly lonely this year. We all are, really. By now, we are all pretty well versed in utilizing online video conferencing platforms to reach out and make connections and Thanksgiving is likely going to test your endurance if this is the only means of connecting your residents with their families. If Zoom Thanksgiving is on your schedule this year, I have found some tips that you can provide to your resident's families to help make the idea of a virtual meal less intimidating and more exciting and structured. A couple of tips from ConnecticutChildrens.Org are, "Try a new twist on a pot luck. Since you’ll all be dining as separate households, a traditional pot luck is out the window. But you can still ask every person to “bring” something to contribute – like a brief toast or favorite family photo to share virtually... Try a gratitude bowl. Have all the households in your extended family start this process a few weeks before Thanksgiving. Each day, each person writes something they’re grateful for on a slip of paper and adds it to their household bowl. During your Thanksgiving virtual event, take turns reading aloud." This adds some tradition to the meal and helps keep things flowing. Aside from the conversation topics, the experience can be tied together using shared visceral experiences. Real Simple suggests, "Coordinate your menus- Work with the hosts of each household to plan at least a few similar dishes on each family’s menu, so you can all enjoy the same appetizers, your family’s secret stuffing recipe, or a slice of apple pie for dessert. Try to coordinate the same dinnertime, so you can “sit down” to dinner together... Create a decorating scheme- Look for ways to make it feel like you’re all in the same space. Order the same flowers from sites like The Bouqs Co. or UrbanStems so you can all enjoy the same centerpiece. If you really want to get matchy-matchy, you can rent the same table settings from sites like Social Studies, which rent out fun tablescapes (including napkins and centerpieces)—you simply return them the day after your party (so you’ll have less clean-up, too)." While it may not be feasible for most all of us to order fancy flower or plate settings, I love the idea of having the resident’s family members drop off a special family dish that all members will be eating as well. A plate setting from the family collection might be able to be provided. Perhaps everyone could swap pictures of their settings to see who took it to the next level. This will give everyone the extra motivation needed to decorate with the same pizazz for a table of four as they did previously for a table of 25. A good way to wrap up the festivities comes by way of a suggestion from OprahMag.Com, "Organize an ornament exchange.- When Santa's sleigh appears at the end of the Macy's Parade, the festive holiday season officially begins. For those who celebrate Christmas, invite each Thanksgiving guest to bring an ornament to exchange to kick-off the holidays and keep the joy going through December." Plan ahead and stay in close communication with staff members, residents and family members. It is going to take a substantial amount of extra work on your part to make this holiday season as special as it can be. Reach out for help. Family members are sitting at home, ready and willing to pitch in however they can. Thank you for all of your hard work making the lives of those you serve special. What you do matters very, very much. https://www.connecticutchildrens.org/coronavirus/8-ways-to-celebrate-a-virtual-thanksgiving-during-covid-19/ https://www.realsimple.com/holidays-entertaining/holidays/thanksgiving/how-to-host-thanksgiving-during-coronavirus https://www.oprahmag.com/life/g29343132/thanksgiving-traditions/?slide=8 Some would argue that pit is the perfect Thanksgiving food and I would be hard pressed to throw up much of an argument. Pie is consumed on Thanksgiving like cake at parties. The Thanksgiving table can often be seen decorated with decadent chocolate, banana, and coconut cream pies, traditional chess and buttermilk pies, all centered around the classic pecan and pumpkin pies. The good news about this, is that you can create a Pie Cart that looks as fancy as a window in a Parisian bakery with relative ease. The secret is the presentation. Visit your local grocery store and purchase as many pies as you think you will need to serve your residents. I recommend buying a a small circular cut out and and stamping out as many circular pie portion as you can get per pie. This will allow you to fit a sampling of pies on a smaller plate for your residents, while also stretching how far your pie goes and setting it up for the toppings that will make it reminiscent of homemade. How to Make Store-Bought Pies Better 10 Ways to Jazz Up Pumpkin Pie, Apple Pie, Pecan Pie and More Written by Stephanie Gallagher Source: The Spruce Eats Have to make a pie for a holiday or special occasion and don't have time? No problem. Here's how to take a store-bought pie and doctor it up to make it look and taste homemade. Start with a good-quality store-bought pie. Even supermarket bakeries have great pies these days. Try to look for one that doesn't have a frozen crust. That too-perfect, cookie-cutter imprinted crimping is a dead giveaway that the pie isn't homemade. Then, all you have to do is get creative with toppings. Maple Whipped Cream This topping is perfect for pumpkin pies and apple pies, but also works with any kind of spiced dessert. Pour 2 cups of cold heavy cream into a chilled glass or stainless steel bowl (it has to be heavy cream; half and half or light cream won't have enough fat in it to whip properly). Beat with an electric mixer or wire whisk until it is almost the consistency of whipped cream. Add 1/4 cup maple syrup. Continue beating until the mixture becomes the consistency of whipped cream. Spoon over the pie and dust with ground cinnamon. Cinnamon Spice Whipped Cream Stir 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg and 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves into store-bought whipped cream. Spoon over pumpkin pie, apple pie or pecan pie. Caramel Sauce Drizzle a good-quality store-bought caramel sauce over apple pie. Chocolate Sauce Drizzle store-bought or homemade chocolate sauce over pumpkin pie, pecan pie or apple pie. Candied Pecans Sprinkle candied pecans over apple pie or pumpkin pie. Toasted Caramel Walnuts Spread 1 cup of chopped walnuts onto a jellyroll pan or a cookie sheet that has sides. Toast in a 350-degree oven for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring several times, until golden brown. Watch the nuts carefully! They can burn easily. Bring 1 cup of pure maple syrup to boil over medium heat. Let the syrup boil for about 5 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in 2 tablespoons butter, 1/3 cup cream, the walnuts, and 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract. Coconut-Pecan Topping Mix 6 tablespoons melted butter with 1/4 cup firmly-packed brown sugar, 1/2 cup chopped pecans, 2/3 cup sweetened flaked coconut and 1/4 cup half-and-half. Sprinkle over pumpkin or chocolate pie and broil for 3 minutes until golden. Sour Cream Topping Whisk together 1 1/2 cups sour cream and 2 tablespoons sugar until smooth. Spoon over pumpkin pie, and bake for 5 minutes at 350 F. Chocolate Cookie Topping Spread store-bought or homemade whipped cream over pumpkin pie, pecan pie or chocolate pudding pie. Sprinkle with crushed chocolate sandwich cookies. Chopped Peanuts and Caramel Sauce Stir 2 tablespoons chopped salted peanuts into 1 cup store-bought caramel sauce. Spoon over apple pie or pumpkin pie. https://www.thespruceeats.com/best-ways-to-doctor-up-store-bought-pies-2098510 The following is a form for your residents to fill out prior to Thanksgiving so that it can be shared with their family members. This helps keep your resident and their lives intertwined with the lives of their descendants. Family member's could also use the responses as clues to help them make this year more special for them. All members could even fill out this questionnaire and the answers could be discussed over Zoom or copies could be mailed. Incorporating smaller traditions and activities will help fill all the gaps created by the quarantine. This Thanksgiving may not be the same as before,but it can still be a memorable one. Print Form Vintage Westclox Ad Circa Thanksgiving 1942 ENROLL NOW! Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 7735
  20. Top 5 Stress Relief Games in 2020 Posted by Yana Yelina | Apr 15, 2020 Source: Mental Health Matters You certainly feel stressed from time to time: negative emotions and fatigue quite often come while you’re at work, and it seems really difficult to get rid of them, distract, and relax a little bit. To provide some examples, 80% of workers are stressed while managing their daily activities (especially those in the USA and China), and almost half admits they need aid in reducing stress and anxiety. Beyond that, according to the statistics, 75% of adults encounter moderate or high levels of stress during few months, with 1 out of 75 persons experiencing panic disorder. Stress is also a top health concern for US and Australian teens. There are several ways to cope with stress from reading a book to yoga. This article explains how you can use stress relief games to help manage your stress. 1. Bubble Wrap Bubble Wrap is a great game for reducing stress. Bubble wrap popping beloved by many people is now available virtually. Just press the bubbles with fingers and make them explode, thus, getting rid of destructive emotions. This free mobile app is also a time killer: you can play it while waiting in a queue or during a long and tiring trip. There’s an option to pop bubbles as long as you desire, or opt for a mini-game (Blitz Pop: the number of bubbles popped within a minute; Pop 500: the speed at which you pop 500 bubbles; Pop All: how fast you’ll be able to pop the whole sheet that includes 2,000 bubbles). The app offers a range of colors, pleasant sounds and allows users to change the bubble size. 2. Color Break Color Break grants a marvelous opportunity to relax and make fun. Try digital painting using your fingertips or stylus and relish an amazing variety of patterns. This app will help to encourage your creativity and forget about a tough day. This stress reliever game boasts an unlimited number of colors and lets users share finished works with friends via emails. This is a great “quiet” game that you can play at work without drawing too much attention your way! 3. Personal Zen Personal Zen is another game for handling stress and anxiety. The app was created with the assistance of neuroscientists, and it’s clinically proven to help people to battle painful emotions and exercise the brain for better wellness. Researchers say it is a bright idea to play Personal Zen a couple of times a week for about 5-10 minutes. However, the longer you play, the better influence on your well-being you experience. Furthermore, the game trains your brain so that you can concentrate on positive things in your life and throw away negatives. Just accurately follow the path of a friendly sprite on the screen without allowing the evil one to distract you. Mediavine 4. Paper Toss Paper Toss is a nice app to use during a break at work. Whenever you feel exhausted and need to relax, take a crumpled piece of paper to make it in a trash basket on your mobile phone. The game offers an automatic count of balls that reached the target, 7 levels of difficulty, stunning graphics, great flick control, natural sounds at the office with comments from angry co-workers, varying speed of the paper flight, and more. So, feel free to have a short break and rest with the Paper Toss app. 5. Relaxing Puzzler Relaxing Puzzler represents a meditative puzzle game with which you’ll be able to take your time and have a rest. Hypnotic soundtracks by Winterpark will give you an opportunity to meditate and reach the state of serenity without noticing the change. The app, inspired by meditative art styles, is easy to use: you just guide the energy by moving rocks around the mystic garden and relax to the full. Read Full Article This pandemic has been incredibly hard for our world. It hit like a ton of bricks and has lasted a great deal of time. It may even seem to most of us that it will never end. The truth is, our world has survived many events that were similar in a lot of ways. In this case, the 1918 Pandemic parallels the struggles that we are facing now. Thankfully, we have made great advancements in our knowledge, skill and understanding and that offers us some relief and tools that were not present in 1918. However, the fear, emotion and disbelief were the same for the people experiencing these events as they are for us. We are never alone in our experiences the way we tend to sometimes feel. The NY Times gathered some excerpts from survivors of the 1918 Pandemic and their insights and thoughts echo much of what can be heard today during this Covid 19 Pandemic. While it is devastating to endure, perhaps we can take heart in the fact that others have gone before us and have come out the other side. Things are ever changing and while this may feel permanent, it will eventually morph into something different. Things will eventfully settle and security will return one day. Below are some of the excerpts from the NY TImes article for you to read and even share with your residents. The full article is linked below it. Memories of the 1918 Pandemic From Those Who Survived Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/04/us/spanish-flu-oral-history.html Nearly everyone who survived the 1918 flu pandemic, which claimed at least half a million American lives, has since died. But their memories, preserved in oral history interviews, shed light on its indelible impact. Bustling major cities and rural towns were brought to their knees, as transportation, law enforcement, commerce and civic life were wiped out. On the scale of death “They were stacked up in the cemetery and they couldn’t bury them. I was living on 31st Street. then. And that was a two-way street then, you know, and it’s one-way now. But people that died over this way had to be buried over this way and they used to have a funeral procession coming this way. And they used to be crossing. You had, they had to come to this bridge, coming one way or the other. And people would be there. And I would be laying in there and I says, I looked out the window and says, ‘There are two funeral processions. One going one way and one going the other way meeting like that.’ And that’s the way it was. There wasn’t a lot of comforts in those days. But it didn’t worry me. I was taking care of myself. What I mean, I wasn’t thinking about it. I wasn’t knowing whether I was going to die or what. I was just figuring it’s got me, and everything else is going on.” — Clifford Adams, Philadelphia, 1984 On fear of the contagion “That was the roughest time ever. Like I say, people would come up and look in your window and holler and see if you was still alive, is about all. They wouldn’t come in.” — Glenn Holler, Conover, N.C., 1980 On the human cost “They were dying — many families losing one or more in their family. It was getting so bad, the deaths, they even, they had to use wagons drawn by two horses to carry people to the grave. I remember seeing them past the house, seems like to me now it was every day. … At that time, when the phone would ring, when my mother or my father wanted to listen in, and they would turn to us, and they would name the person they just heard had died. It was night and day that you would hear about these people dying. My father never got the flu but he would go to town and buy groceries for the neighbors and take it to the front porch. And we didn’t get the flu at all in our family, but it was terrible.” — Robert McKinney Martin Jr., 1996 Read Full Article You are what you eat. Scientists have fast been connecting nutritional intake and food sensitivities with mental illnesses and behavioral issues. There is no way around it, what you fuel your body with needs to be clean and recognized as real food. This is especially important during times of great stress or when a strong immune system is pertinent. If stress is not managed, it may wreck havoc on your health down the road in the form of physical symptoms. According to Eating Well, there are a several foods you should consider throwing into your diet, and perhaps your food cart, that can specifically help with stress relief. 7 Foods for Stress Relief Source: Eating Well Stress can take a toll on your body’s natural defenses, but eating the right foods can offer relief. 1. Snack on Nuts 2. Add in Red Peppers 3. Serve Salmon Twice a Week 4. Bust Out the Spinach 5. Fill Up on Oatmeal 6. Indulge in Dark Chocolate 7. Sip Tea Read Full Article Activity Starter Create a Tea Cart with a variety of stress relieving teas and some dark chocolate. Pick approximately 3 different tea types and provide disposable cups, hot water, honey and lemon slices. Some good stress relieving teas are: Chamomile Lavender Peppermint *Kava (*this one has one of the strongest sedative effects.) Passionflower The Stress Diet This diet is designed to help you cope with the stress that builds during the day. Breakfast ½ grapefruit 1 slice whole wheat toast (dry) 8 oz. skim milk Lunch 4 oz. lean broiled chicken breast 1 c. steamed spinach 1 c. herb tea 1 Oreo cookie Mid-afternoon snack Rest of Oreos in the package 2 pints Rocky Road ice cream 1 jar hot fudge sauce Nuts, cherries, whipped cream Dinner 2 loaves Garlic Bread with cheese Large deluxe pizza 1 large pitcher of Beer 3 Milky Way candy bars Late evening snack Entire frozen cheesecake (eaten from freezer) Rules for this Diet: If you eat something and no one sees you eat it, it has no calories. If you drink a diet soda with a candy bar, the calories in the candy are cancelled out by the diet soda When you eat with someone else, calories don’t count, if you don’t eat more than they do. Food used for medicinal purposes never count, such as hot chocolate, brandy, toast and cheesecake. If you fatten up everyone else around you, then you look thinner. Movie-related foods, such as Milk Duds, buttered popcorn, Junior mints, Red Hots, and Tootsie Rolls, do not have additional calories because they are part of the entire entertainment package and are not part of one’s personal fuel. Cookie pieces contain no calories. The process of breakage causes calorie leakage. Things licked off knives and spoons have no calories if you are in the process of preparing something. Foods that are the same color have the same number of calories, Examples: spinach and pistachio ice cream; mushrooms and white chocolate. Note: chocolate is a universal color and may be substituted for any other food color. - Author Unknown Courtesy of: Allison Bennett, AD-TXC Enroll Now Over 90 Graduates last Month - NAAPCC.net "The Most Trusted Credentialing Body in the Industry." Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  21. The Introduction- Meeting Your Resident There is a skill in the art of introducing oneself and every healthcare professional must possess well practiced expertise in this area. The very essence of successful wellness care relies on this ability. This first meet and greet frequently establishes the baseline from which “trust” is built and that’s a seriously powerful tool for those wishing to care for others. You will find yourself doing this introduction repeatedly throughout your workday, and this one action will either hamper your relationship with those you serve or greatly lead to open and trusting exchange. Here are a few reminders about how to introduce yourself to your resident. Use your first and last name. You may wear a name badge to help participants remember your name until they become familiar with you. Even if your resident has short-term-memory issues, he/she will understand and appreciate this small formality. Call your resident by Mr./Mrs. and their last name as well. Those wishing you to use their first names or last name only will tell you so or may announce a preferred nickname. Endearing terms are NOT permissible. Avoid using terms like “sweetie” or “dear” remind yourself that these are very grown up adults; such terms are offensive and patronizing. Use a relaxed and friendly tone of voice. This will help establish a relaxed conversation. In addition, a relaxed tone will also serve to increase the residents’ confidence in your abilities. Keep the volume of your voice at a regular level unless it becomes evident that he/she is having difficulty hearing you. Remember that your “body language” will say more than words. Body language is the physical clue that we use often without thinking. Some examples of positive body language are smiling, a touch, nodding and making eye contact with the person who is talking. Examples of body language that express displeasure are frowning, raising an eyebrow and folding our arms over our chest. Body language should match what you are saying. Even people with severe memory problems who have difficulty understanding what you say, can still “read” your body language. Establish eye contact. This means looking at the person to whom you are talking. Eye contact tells the other person you are listening and that you mean what you are saying. Directly face the resident when you speak and get to his/her level (if they are sitting, sit down next to them). Keep in mind, however, and respect different cultural backgrounds and the possibility that they may interpret direct eye contact differently. It can be viewed as confrontational or authoritative posture – know this about your resident. Many older people have difficulty hearing and unconsciously rely on “lip-reading” to understand what others are saying. Never shout; it raises the pitch of your voice. Many older people lose the ability to hear high-pitched sounds. That is why many older people tell you they can understand a man’s voice better than a woman’s voice. Listening is extremely important. It is often more important to “zip your lip” and focus on what the other person is trying to tell you than it is to speak. It takes older people longer to react than the younger ones. Give older people plenty of time to respond to your questions/comments, never make them feel that time is of the essence. Communication is important in all interactions and it is the bridge to successfully learning the wants and needs of your resident. From introductions to day-to-day communication, you will establish a trusting relationship with each resident that forms mutual respect that dissipates the residents’ hesitation and opens the door for you to become his/her champion. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  22. View this email in your browser Halloween, like the rest of the year, is going to be a bit different than usual. As an Activity Director, you are use to making the best of things and this Halloween is no exception. Halloween is known for its mask wearing vibes and it feeds right into our mask wearing quarantine restrictions. Creative shops everywhere are churning out fun and festive masks perfect for Halloween. Just add some eye makeup and your costume is done. You could even take your regular cloth masks and add fun appliques to wear leading up to the big day. Consider having a Halloween mask decorating contest and see who can come up with the most creative mask! Below are some examples to get your wheels turning. Don't forget to decorate some masks for your pumpkin friends! This is a simple activity that all your residents can participate in while adhering to quarantine guidelines. You could even take it room to room for the residents that are unable to leave their rooms. Consider creating two of them.One for staff members and one for your residents. Fill it with all your favorite Halloween treats and provide slips for participants to write their guess on and collect them all in a collection box. Place the candy filled jar out one week prior to Halloween to give everyone a chance to guess. On Halloween, announce the winner! Note: Be sure and have extras in case there are multiple correct guesses. Now comes the fun part! Your Halloween Food Cart! Sure, you could fill it with beautiful jars of colorful candy and cute little cupcake that look like baby pumpkins. Or.... you could get a little dirty this year! Why not load your cart with some super creepy, extra weird, not sure if I can eat that kind of stuff? It will certainly have your whole facility buzzing about it and sneaking over to take a peek. Check out some of the "gross" options below. I tried to pick some simple ones so that you can have as many options as possible on your cart. Share your creations on Facebook! Circa 1960 Curtiss Candy Company Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  23. Celebrate National Candy Corn Day on October 30th! Hedgehog Pumpkins Source: Better Homes and Garden Chocolate candy corn glued around a cute felt face creates an adorable hedgehog pumpkin! These easy no-carve pumpkins come alive in a snap. We'll show you how to perfectly frame the face and keep the candy spaced evenly to form the cutest pumpkin creature. Supplies Needed Faux pumpkin Chocolate candy corn Felt in pink, gray, and burgundy Painters tape Scissors Hot-glue gun and sticks Click button below for full directions! Hedgehog Pumpkins Observe World Mental Heath Day on October 10th Sometimes it can be easier to see what is physically ailing someone more easily then what may be mentally ailing them. This is especially true within our elderly population as they have likely mastered hiding certain aspects of it and symptoms of mental imbalance can often be attributed to ageing in general. The added barrier is that our residents come from a generation that was likely not comfortable expressing mental concerns as their generation tends to see them as weaknesses. In order to overcome this, it needs to be openly discussed and embraced. Your residents need to know that these issues are common and they do not have to just suffer through them. Help them to feel that it is okay to work on their mental health and to reach out if they they need more help. Below is a free, downloadable Daily Mood Tracker from Rose-Minded.Com. Visit the link to see their 7 different tracker styles and print out the one you like the best for your residents. Have those that are interested take the time to fill it out and discuss some of their answers if they feel comfortable doing so. It is incredibly important to help them practice taking steps to manage their mental health and self care needs. This will not only improve their quality of life, but it could also help them to extend it. Daily Mood Tracker Worksheet Celebrate International Day of the Nacho on October 21st! Crockpot Nacho Cheese Dip Source: PrincessPinkyGirl.Com Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 4 hours Servings: 8 Ingredients 1 green pepper (chopped) 1 bunch scallions (tops only, chopped) 1 10.5 oz can cream of celery soup 1 15.5 oz jar mild salsa 1 16 oz box Velveeta cheese 1 lb ground hamburger Click the button below for the full recipe! Get Full Recipe HERE Circa 1952 Woman's Home Companion Magazine Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351 Want to change how you receive these emails?
  24. The time we have all been waiting for has finally arrived…..I Love Lucy Day is near. October 15th is a time for Lucy lovers everywhere to come together and show their appreciation for the original queen of comedy, the glass ceiling shattering, the studio owning, the great, the one and the only Lucille Ball! This Activity Corner is dedicated to all things Lucy. Prepare events to accompany an I Love Lucy Watch-A-Thon at your facility. Each activity suggestion can be incorporated throughout the day. If you really wanted to sell it, you could wear a Lucy costume. It will be Halloween time after all. 1" Bottlecap Template Printable Crossword Theme Music Which of your residents are Lucy’s #1 Fan? Many of us have seen the episodes so many times we could recite the script word for word. couldn’t we? Below is the actual script from Season 1, Episode 1 - The Girls Want to Go to the Nightclub. You use this script in a couple of ways. You can either print it out and mark out some of the lines and hand copies out to your residents. Allow them time to fill in what lines they think are missing. The one with the most correct/closest answers wins! Or you could re-enact a scene over the loudspeaker radio show style, in honor of I Love Lucy’s roots. Below is the beginning of the script. Click the button below to see the full script. (I Love Lucy theme music plays) (theme song ending) Here, you missed something on this one. That's the design. It is? Sure, can't you see? Flowers against a background of...gravy. I've been meaning to talk to you about Monday night. We want you and Ricky to help us celebrate. It's our wedding anniversary. Oh, yours and Fred's? No, me and Gregory Peck. We've been married for 18 years and I vowed that at least once before I died, Fred was going to take me to a nightclub on our wedding anniversary. Well, that sounds reasonable. Now, this is my plan. We'll go in there and I'll say: "I know what let's do next Monday night. Let's go to a nightclub." And you second the motion. Then Ricky will bound to his feet and say "That's great." Then Fred will have to take me because if... Ricky bounds to his feet and says, "That's great"? Right. Wrong. Ricky hates nightclubs. But he works in one. Your life should be just one gay round of nightclubs. Yeah, that's what I thought when I married a bandleader, but ever since we said "I do", there are so many things we don't. Full Script Fill your cart up with Cuban specialties in honor of the main fella in Lucy’s life, Ricky Ricardo. These appetizers are simple and easy to serve in disposable containers. Serve along with Mariquitas, plantain chips, a Cuban tradition. Cuban Sandwich On A Stick Appetizer Total Time: 10 minutes Servings: 24 Author: Katie Crenshaw Ingredients 6 slices of ham 24 swiss cheese cubes 24 mini dill pickles or cornichons 2 tbs whole grain mustard 24 to toothpicks Get Full Recipe HERE Circa 1950's Second Honeymoon Enroll Now Over a 100 Students graduating this session. Come Join In., It Starts Tomorrow. NAPT Activity Training Course for NAAPCC National Association of Activity Professionals Credentialing Center is the Most Highly Respected Certifying Body in the United States. Members in Good Standing with the NCCA "National Commission for Certifying Agencies" since 2011 View the requirements , NAAPCC Certification Standards Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
 
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