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  1. Make a Difference Day October 26, 2019 by M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP This day is an unofficial secular holiday or observance focused on community service and volunteer efforts. Traditionally celebrated on the fourth Saturday in October since 1992. All across the United States volunteers perform projects for their community, for individuals in need and a number of charitable organizations. This October 26th millions of volunteers will come together to honor “Make a Difference Day.” This day is observed as one of the largest and most widely recognized days for community service efforts. Volunteers actively engage in environmental tasks, charity fund raising such as bake sales local food banks, donate their time to nursing homes and women’s safe haven centers, and a host of many other activities. Not only to celebrate but to create awareness that people can truly make a difference when joining forces with actions to improve the quality of life for so many individuals. One of the most rewarding things about “Make a Difference Day” is that it matters not the volunteer age or background, we can all help others. We can give back to the communities and profoundly change the world. Senior Volunteer Programs do Making a Difference Older adults participating in volunteer programs will find it extremely rewarding on a number of levels. While there are a variety of groups and places the older adult can choose to support, the choice is often based more so on becoming involved in something that allows the volunteer to feel useful once again. The rewards gained from acceptance while volunteering to help others is immeasurable and as a whole, the wise elder appreciates and benefits tremendously from the experience. Whether it’s within their own nursing home, community center, adult day health center, or assisted living facility there are so many avenues and opportunities for older adults to really “make a difference” through volunteer services. Note: Adults over the age of 55 comprised nearly 36% of the 62.6 million volunteers, with 10% of the volunteers being 75 years old or older. https://www.leisurecare.com/resources/benefits-of-volunteering-seniors/ Volunteering Benefits Volunteering has important emotional and physical health benefits for the volunteer – especially when that volunteer happens to be an older adult. Depending on availability of time and the level of energy your resident possesses, you will find plenty of ways for seniors to experience the benefits from volunteering opportunities. Here’s a list of just a few possibilities and their respective benefits: Children - Teach them well. We all know that seniors are great stories tellers. Pair your residents up with youngsters by holding an Intergenerational Program. Seniors can volunteer during story hour and tell the little ones about history because they’ve lived through it firsthand. Who does not love to hear wonderful accounts of days of the past filled with curiosity and adventure? Additionally, children whom otherwise may not have previous experience with elders will learn to accept those imperfections that come with aging and come to respect and value the elder’s wisdom. Pay It Forward – The resident as a student then becomes the teacher. Plan to kick leisure pursuits up a notch by creating a “resident to resident volunteer program.” This would be one to one or small groups. Encourage those elders that have learned new found skills in technology, crafting, cooking, etc. to share what they have learned with their fellow residents. It is an opportunity for your resident to pay it forward. This is a dual benefiting experience both for the resident sharing knowledge and the resident learning something new. The added bonus it that it makes way for wonderful resident friendships. Supporting the Community - Volunteering for organizations and services gets seniors out into the community and is a great way to instill a sense of purpose and responsibility while also encouraging social engagement and friendships. A recent study of adults over the age of 60 who volunteer reported higher levels of well-being and lower disability than those who did not volunteer. Note: Current regulations specify that community involvement opportunities must be in place within senior care facilities. Where Seniors can Volunteer If you want to volunteer with seniors you can contact a number of services and programs within your local area. If you’re not sure where to go there are many organizations that can help you find a place where your older adults’ services are needed. Here’s a look at some to contact: Elder Helpers National Council on Aging AARP Volunteer Match Volunteers of America Meals on Wheels One Foster Grandparent's Rebound Anna Nelson, 70, a Foster Grandparent volunteer with five- and six-year-olds in Knoxville, Tenn., for the past three years, can attest to the study’s results. “I’m not depressed anymore. My blood pressure has come down. My blood work is now normal. My cholesterol level is down,” said Nelson, one of 500 Senior Corps volunteers in Knoxville. In addition, Nelson said, “I’ve lost weight from being more active with the kids. They get me moving.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2019/03/12/the-volunteering-that-makes-people-55-healthier/#7672e1cde5e8 Note: According to the Corporation for National Community & Service, the most common forms of volunteering are: Collecting, serving, preparing, or distributing food Fundraising or selling items to raise money Engaging in general labor, like helping build homes or clean up parks Tutoring or teaching Mentoring the youth Collecting, making, or distributing clothing No matter if it’s walking dogs at the local Humane Society, building a home for Habitat for Humanity or restocking books at the local library, volunteering keeps seniors physically active. Maintaining physical fitness and an active lifestyle can prevent a number of injuries and prevent or delay the onset of some diseases. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org BUY Now Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  2. What’s The Difference Between Adult Day Centers? Alzheimer’s and dementia care facilities Socialization and safety centers Medical, therapy and socialization centers Adult Day Centers are either social or medical in nature with a specifically trained and compassionate staff that creates programs to meet the needs, preferences and cultural differences of those they serve. These facilities offer supportive assistance by way of physical activities and cognitive stimulation and/ or medical care during the day-time hours (no overnight stays). Family members can plan for daily “predictable respite” for which they might use to relax or go to work or run necessary errands (without the added burden of taking their senior loved ones with them). When participants go home to be with their families after a day at the center, families will find their loved ones happy, stimulated, alert and often more ready to sleep soundly through the night. This provides the entire family with a most welcomed nighttime benefit which is often desperately needed. Without a doubt adult day health programming leads to improved well-being and increased socialization within a safe, nurturing and comfortable community setting. Medical vs. Social - There are two types of adult day care: Both provide a comfortable, secure place for a senior to reside during the day, enabling them to socialize, stay active, remain productive and enjoy an improved quality of life. Typically, the center provides one or two meals a day. Some centers provide transportation for pick up and/or drop off, which may or may not be included in the cost. The main difference between medical and social day care is that the medical model also provides an array of medical professionals, which may include on-site registered nurses, speech therapists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, social workers and registered dietitians. NOTE: The easiest way to identify the difference between these two centers is to take a look at the name. An “adult day care” facility, without the word “health” in the title is not required to adhere to the same standards and regulations and do not offer the availability of on-site health care professionals from a range of disciplines to provide clinical oversight. Adult Day Centers and Offerings Socialization and safety centers – Adult Day Care Adult Day Care centers generally have well-trained activity specialists who lead dynamic activities programs. These programs might include arts and crafts, intergenerational programs, music, cooking classes, exercise sessions, movies, discussion groups, live entertainment and trips into the community. Some care centers offer programs that are especially designed for physically frail individuals with special medical needs such as diabetes, hypertension and post-stroke disabilities, and those with mental health challenges such as dementia, confusion and Alzheimer's disease. The goal is to be an extension of the home environment with caring, personalized service. These centers rely on private pay reimbursement for services provided. Medical, therapy and socialization centers – Adult Day Health Adult Day Health centers offer all of the same services you would find in Adult Day Care centers mentioned above, in addition; they provide ” certified” amenities via trained health care professionals such as physical, occupational and speech therapies, nursing services, personal care, social services and much more depending on the individuals acuity level assessment. These centers are prepared and well equipped to enroll not only very independent individuals but also those with chronic physical illness and/or cognitively challenging needs. Most states have specific governing bodies that work to establish procedures for licensing and regulation standards to oversee the business of Adult Day Health “medical” care centers. These regulations are mandated and centers are required to adhere to guidelines and protocols to be given licensing privileges. These standards are not only specific to medical record guidelines but are also required for the centers to qualify to submit billing to Medicaid and/or Medicare for reimbursement of services on behalf of those participants pre-approved to receive these benefits. Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care centers – may be found in either social or medical model centers (medical facilities usually provide for more advanced stages of the disease). Alzheimer's and Dementia Care centers provide care for patients that are at a heightened risk for safety and cannot be left unsupervised. Progressive memory and cognitive decline may lead to potential for wandering and risk for self harm from misuse of everyday regular household items. This puts family caregivers in a difficult position, especially if outside help is scarce and/or family members are still working. Dementia programs at adult day centers typically utilize security features to prevent wandering as well as improved staffing ratios to ensure seniors are safe and their needs are met in a timely manner. This provides invaluable free time and peace of mind for the dementia caregivers. Skilled Adult day centers that specialize in the care of those with dementia are becoming more and more in demand in light of the increased numbers of seniors diagnosed with this disease over the past few years. Many states require centers to have staff members obtain specific dementia training to care for this population. Trained professionals are able to recognize those seniors that prefer quiet, solitude like environment while others are in desperate need of more stimulation. This expertise proactively minimizes potential disruptive behavior by addressing each individual’s unique needs. State regulations have been written to target this topic requiring medication management to modify behavior to be used only as the last option after it is documented that all non-pharmaceutical interventions have been implemented without success through the individualized care plan. In Conclusion... Adult Day centers provide an array of activities for attendees to participate in; adapted to each person’s unique abilities to maximize enjoyment and minimize frustration. Many centers also offer flexible scheduling choices from attending just a few hours each day to attending the entire day for one or more days per week. The affordable cost of care for Adult Day allows these centers to be more accessible to a wide range of families for senior care options. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Introducing a NEW course from Best-Selling Teacher Kathy Hughes, ADC... ENROLL Now Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  3. Our amazing consultant, M. Celeste Chase, has earned her CMDCP and we are most excited to congratulate her accomplishment! Celeste works extremely hard to ensure that she is delivering the absolute best advice and education in every single one of her weekly columns. Her contributions are greatly helping Activity Professionals everywhere to improve the lives of the residents they serve while maintaining confidence in their skill set. We are very proud and grateful for you Celeste. Celeste was kind enough to provide information below regarding the certification mission and process in case any of you are interested in obtaining it for yourself. We support you! Certified Montessori Dementia Care Professional (CMDCP) About my New Certification The Montessori Method can help build self-worth in dementia residents—and help them connect with the outside world despite their dementia. With its focus on respect for the resident, a safe and nurturing environment, and activities that promote engagement on a level that’s possible. Montessori Method for Dementia Residents Maria Montessori was one of Italy’s first female physicians. In 1907, she developed a new type of school—designed for challenging students who were once considered “un-teachable.” Her work gradually allowed her to recognize that her methods were equally successful for adults with dementia. Under the Montessori philosophy, nothing the resident says or does is “wrong.” The work incorporates creative involvement within the resident’s version of the world, rather than to attempt to correct memory or perceptions. Promote Value Focus remained on the value of the resident and the importance of promoting that he/she still has intrinsic value—and to introduce activities that foster that feeling. For example: Higher-functioning dementia residents may be asked to teach others with lower functions on how to do certain tasks—promoting the idea that they still have useful skills to teach others. Montessori principles and interventions are effective with people who have a memory deficit but could still engage in procedural learning. Activities with patients with dementia are structured to progress from the simple to the complex and are intended to be interactive for short bursts of time. Engagement by stimulating the mind with activities that use fine motor skills. Use of shapes, cards, chips, and objects that enhance dexterity. Engaging Senses Montessori activities are specifically designed to appeal to all five senses, helping dementia residents connect to the world around them in a safe and nurturing environment. The program often uses art and music therapy, mild physical exercise, and group activities that focus on the individual's abilities. These activities are designed to evoke positive emotions—and help them reconnect with the world around them. Connection with Long-Term Memory While more recent memories are often destroyed by dementia, many residents retain their long-term memory. Montessori method creates opportunities for dementia patients to reconnect to positive long-term memories, a tactic that can help draw dementia resident out of states of withdrawal, isolation, or paranoia. Maintaining Respect This means respecting and honoring their current perceptions and memories—even if those are “wrong” by objective standards. It also includes trying to meet the resident where they are, offering activities that start with their capabilities and gently push the envelope to help them build new skills, and honoring the abilities and achievements the resident is still capable of doing. The Montessori Method places an emphasis on independence, freedom within limits, and respect for a person’s natural psychological, physical, and social development. I am honored to have recently achieved this designation. Approval Process Your experience and credentials are submitted for approval to the International Council of Certified Dementia Practitioners (ICCDP). Once approved, you are required to take a 6 hour course through the Center for Applied Research in Dementia and pass an exam. FYI- There is a cost and requirements for renewal. More INFO Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  4. Creating In-Services for your Activity Department and the Facility by M. Celeste Chase AC-BC, ACC, CDP ActivityDirector.org Learning opportunities through in-services not only sends an intrinsic message that staff is highly valued but will also boost employment retention and job satisfaction. Appropriately supported, in-services have an added benefit of preventing job burnout for those in the demanding healthcare industry and that is a win-win for everyone! Interpretive Guidelines Tag 679 – Identifies that “all staff” is accountable for assuring that meaningful activities are provided to ALL RESIDENTS regardless of resident limitations or lack of response. To this end, all staff members must fully understand not only the therapeutic value of engagement as it relates to quality of life, but must possess appropriate skills, techniques and strategies to deliver meaningful activities. The Activity Director is the key individual to take the lead in this training through facility in-services. A great place to find topics (“good bones”) for in-services can easily be found within the Interpretive Guidelines. Let’s take a look at three up and coming guidelines from: [Phase 3] - OBRA 87’ Interpretive Guidelines effective on: November 28, 2019 F940 §483.95 Training Requirements Facilities must develop, implement and maintain an effective training program that is based on the Facility Assessment. Training must be completed for new staff, existing staff, contracted individuals and volunteers (consistent with their roles). The amount and type of training required should be reflective of the services and patient acuity identified in the Facility Assessment. This guideline states that training topics must include, but are not limited to: Communication Resident’s Rights QAPI - Quality Assurance & Performance Improvement Infection Control Compliance and Ethics Behavioral Health F941 Communication Training Facilities must have mandatory training for direct care staff on effective communications. The importance of communication is emphasized, including communication across all shifts and information sharing between staff, residents and representatives. Direct care staff needs to understand their responsibilities for reporting change in condition and sharing information between team members for continuity in care provided that is based on individualized interventions. F942 Resident’s Rights Training Facilities must ensure that all staff members – not just direct care staff – receive appropriate education on resident’s rights and be knowledgeable in the facility’s responsibilities in providing care for its residents. Under F550 Resident’s Rights, residents have the right to be treated with dignity and respect, and all interventions with residents by staff must assist the residents in maintaining/enhancing their self-esteem and self-worth, show respect for each resident’s individuality and incorporate the resident’ goals, choices and preferences. NOTE: This training requirement is likely to already exist in most facilities, but facilities that do not have this topic included in its staff education requirements will need to do so by the [Phase 3] deadline mentioned above. You can easily see that OBRA 87’ Interpretive Guidelines makes training expectations abundantly clear and sets the bar for specific materials for learning opportunities. This will provide you with a strong arsenal of tools from which you can reference for new in-services to ensure that your facility complies with recommended standards. Be sure to compare these topics with your new staff member’s orientation training topics as well as your annual mandatory re-education plan. For a successful in-service experience, develop a strategy that supports team synergy and mutual respect to get other staff members excited and willing to be committed to your program. In-Service/ Foundation Plan: Listed below are the preliminary steps to develop your in-service program. Each component is a building block to the next and will get you well on your way to creating a strong and successful in-service that will enlighten your fellow staff associates in a way in which they will better understand and respect the complex nature of the work you do as a professional Activity Director. Component # 1 –Training Order The order of presenting in-service training sessions can start with the most urgent to least urgent or oldest information to newest information, or build upon the initial session to the next. The ladder works well if the attendees need to understand certain things before assimilating more advanced materials. Component # 2 - Ask How Your Attendees Learn Best Another effective time saving strategy is to incorporate learning styles that are well suited to in-service attendees. As you most likely know, many of us attain information better when given specific ways to learn. Some people learn the quickest through reading, while others prefer visuals and hands-on experience. Understanding the learning styles of your audience will make your time more effective and productive thus, getting the most value for the time spent. Component # 3 - Materials Distribution Before the In-Service Consider distributing informative materials such as manuals, or short “cheat sheets” or step-by-step introductions relating to the topic scheduled for the in-service before training session begins. This is a great way to build up in-service anticipation and interest. Distribution prior to the in-service will also decrease the customary introduction time at the beginning of the in-service and help you jump right into the material to be presented. Component # 4 - Create a Training Schedule When in-service trainings are conducted during “on-duty” hours it is wise to set a predictable schedule. This allows attendees to plan for floor coverage and seek necessary supervisory approval in advanced. Be cognizant and adaptable to staff availability to ensure optimum participation. Mindful scheduling during on-duty hours to reduce staff “off the floor time” will also be looked upon favorably by your administration. HINT: In-services held after regular work hours should also be respectfully scheduled so that it doesn't infringe upon the staff’s anticipated leisure time. Once again your consideration and sensitivity in this area will more likely create eager participation. Component # 5 – Incorporate Session Breaks It’s a given that long in-service training may not be permissible particularly when staff’s “off the floor” coverage proves to be challenging. That said, take a moment to break away even for s short bathroom visit. It may be all you need to keep your attendees focused and refreshed thus, moving the in-service in a positive direction throughout the session. Component # 6 – Serve Light Refreshments As a very common and familiar adage goes, If you feed them - they will come! Providing food at a business event can promote attendance and provide a welcoming atmosphere which in turn, will get your in-service off to a great start. Keep it simple – consider dietary restrictions. What you serve will depend on the time of day that you schedule your in-service. Morning events tend to focus on coffee, tea, fruits, pastries, etc. Afternoon events are more likely to be about soda, cookies, pretzels, etc. Bottled water is always appropriate no matter what time of the in-service and decaffeinated options should always be offered. Creating and organizing interdisciplinary facility in-services for staff will set you apart from the rest and help you develop a reputation as a knowledgeable and credible professional in your field. Fellow staff members and associates will quickly recognize the complexity of your position and will readily get on board to ensure that every staff member provides “quality of life” opportunities for all the residents within your facility. “Opportunities for learning - present an extraordinary prospect to expand our knowledge base and growth both in personal confidence and competency skills that ultimately will benefit the residents we serve.” Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to CelesteChase @ activitydirector.org ENROLL Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  5. We have several new CE Courses up on the website http://activitydirector.org You can take any of the courses & finish them in one sitting or work on them a little at a time. Once you have completed the course(s) you will be able to download the certificate yourself & print it out.
  6. Perfect Summer Fruit Salad From allrecipes.com By Nicole Graham Holley I made this recipe over July 4th. It was cold, refreshing & the sauce is wonderful. You could easily take this recipe & make an activity out of it. Have residents help with cutting the fruit & placing it in the bowl. The AD can do the cooking. Make this in the am. Place in refrigerator & then in the afternoon gather residents up to eat. This should be in the refrigerator for at least 3 hours. Ingredients: 2/3 C fresh orange juice 1/3 C fresh lemon juice 1/3 C packed brown sugar ½ tsp grated orange zest ½ tsp grated lemon zest 1 tsp vanilla extract 2 C cubed fresh pineapple 2 C strawberries, hulled & sliced 3 kiwi fruit, peeled & sliced 3 bananas, sliced 2 oranges, peeled & sectioned 1 C seedless grapes 2 C blueberries Directions: Bring orange juice, lemon juice, brown sugar, orange & lemon zest to a boil in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low, simmer until slightly thicken about 5 mins. Remove from heat stir in vanilla extract. Set aside to cool In a clear glass bowl, just for looks, place all the fruit into the bowl. Pour the sauce over all the fruit. Then gently mix all the fruit & sauce together. Cover & place in refrigerator for 3 to 4 hours. You can use any fruit, peaches, melon etc.
  7. The Villas at Stanford Ranch, Rocklin's luxurious assisted living community for seniors, is seeking an Activities Director to add to the team! Our assisted living community houses all three tiers - Memory Care, Assisted Living, and Independent Living. We are seeking an activities Director for our Independent and Assisted Living sector.. Are you an upbeat, happy-go-lucky, event planning, organized, outside the box thinker? If you answered yes, and meet the requirements below, apply today! Responsibilities include: Ensure our residents recognize personal satisfaction and enrichment through designing and implementing innovative and creative activities, programs, outings and other events. Develop newsletter content, flyers, activity calendars, one-pagers, and other collateral material that support resident/family/staff awareness and engagement. Collaborate with other Department Heads to ensure full visibility of programming. Develop, proactively plan and implement creative activities, outings and programs that enrich our resident's lives. Control costs, manage the activities budget, manage and inspire the activities team Promote participation in activities and help foster social connectedness between residents. Gather feedback from residents concerning activities and adjust programs to best meet the resident's needs. Involve family members and guests in activities/programs whenever possible. Coordinate resident transportation for needs including, but not limited to, activities, shopping, and doctor trips Establish and coordinate the Community Resident Council and attend all meetings Listen and respond to all resident problems, complaints, suggestions, and ideas regarding activities Coordinate use of all volunteers Document history of community with photographs and scrapbooks Works under general supervision but functions well with autonomy. MUST be a team player! Skills required: Excellent communication skills: You will be working with a variety of people and departments, so it's critical that you enjoy interacting with others on a daily basis and are comfortable speaking in front of small groups. Incredible attention to detail: It's the little things that count! Self-directed: Must be able to take a project, run with it, and (ideally) exceed expectations by anticipating needs. Creativity: We are a luxurious community and hold ourselves to a high standard. Creativity in developing outside the box activities that differentiate us from the competition is crucial. Organization: Amongst the chaos of the day to day responsibilities and activities, maintaining organization is a must. If you are looking for a rewarding position and a great company culture, we urge you to apply! The Villas At Stanford Ranch is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer. Full-time Staffing staffing@thevillasatstanfordranch.com 1430 W. Stanford Ranch Rd. Rocklin, CA 95765 Phone: (916)741-7050 Fax: (916)259-2698
  8. actnet

    Hello

    Good Morning, It's been a long time, but always like to have popcorn, and even the puffed popcorn for those that can't have regular popcorn, Oriental trading is a great company to get a lot of your decorations, and I would check to see if the boy and girl scouts could do something for you and also check with the local drama clubs, you might want to check with an animal rescue or something like that. I wish you the best, and as always here to help in any way. Mary Zonneville Sodus
  9. Behavioral Health Programming Guide for Skilled Nursing Facilities written by M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, Price: $14.95 Product Code: BHealthGuid Product Information The New Behavioral Health Regulations F740-F744, F758 & F659 have become part of the 2018-2019 CMS.gov Survey Process for Skilled Nursing Facilities. The regulations are facility wide but the Activity Department is right in the middle of things. This Programming Guide, written by M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, provides a Step by Step approach to help the Activity Professional and Staff to understand the challenges Behavioral Health presents and how to respond with activities that help redirect and reduce disruptive or unwanted behaviors. Celeste has deconstructed the most common Behavioral Health issues into a language easy to understand, triggers, strategies, engagement, adaptations, interventions, samples and goals. This Programming Guide will help you and your facility become Behavioral Health Compliant with minimal stress. Behavioral Health - Behavioral health encompasses a resident’s whole emotional and mental well-being, which include, but is not limited to the prevention and treatment of mental and substance use disorders. Not surprisingly, federal agencies such as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) support behavioral health and psychiatric well-being for individuals in senior care facilities. Specifically, the concern centers on the over-reliance of anti psychotic medication use for residents with disruptive behaviors. Unwanted behaviors must first be treated through behavioral interventions before psychoactive medications can be administered. :::::: Behavior Management mandates requires: THAT STAFF MUST: § Possess appropriate competencies and skill sets to care for residents diagnosed with mental and psycho-social disorders as well as those with a history of trauma and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). § Provide treatment and services to correct the assessed problem or to attain the highest practicable mental and psycho-social well being for residents that display/diagnosed with; mental disorder psycho-social adjustment difficulty history of trauma or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) § Monitor for patterns of behavior difficulties not previously diagnosed, assessed or revealed that decreases social interaction and/or increases withdrawn, angry, or depressive behaviors- unless the clinical condition demonstrates that development of such a pattern was unavoidable. § Provide a resident who displays or is diagnosed with dementia with appropriate treatment and services to attain or maintain his or her highest practicable physical, mental, and psycho-social well-being. § Provide medically related social services to attain or maintain his or her highest practicable physical, mental, and psycho-social well-being. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ sample ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  10. Is your facility ready for the NEW Behavioral Health Regulations? Kathy Hughes has written an all inclusive CE Course to guide you and your team through the new regulations. This is a 15CE NCCAP PreApproved Online Course The New Ftags were enacted to ensure residents effected by "Behavioral Health" are properly cared for and their needs met. This course was created to help you identify behavioral health issues in your residents and plan your programs in a purposeful way. Many examples are provided to guide you on your path to creating meaningful experiences. You are in a unique position to greatly improve the lives of those you serve and to help them in ways that may significantly and positively impact them. This course will teach you what is needed to satisfy your State Surveyors New Behavioral Health Regulations for providing care for residents with Behavioral Health conditions. We will compare exactly what is written in the regulations to the paperwork and forms we use everyday. Topics covered include: Conditions or Diseases that Fall within the Behavioral Health Category and Specific Ways to Address Each of Them. Assuring Careplans and Activity Programs are Compliant with the New Behavioral Health Regulations (f740-f744). This will be an exciting journey that will greatly improve the way your department addresses individual needs. This course will force you to look at things in a whole new light, while empowering you to take meaningful action. Let's begin! Visit Activity Directors Network at http://www.activitydirector.org/classroom
  11. Activities for Men While walking through most Long Term Care facilities you will easily take note that the ratio of female versus male residents is significantly tipped towards the female population. Women residents outnumber men at the rate of about 2 to 1 (partly due to the fact women live longer than men). Contributing factors that tip the scale further is that it is not uncommon to find that approximately 80% of the staff is also female and the majority of visitors in general are female as well. Men are simply outnumbered in Long Term Care facilities. http://digg.com/2017/sex-ratio-america-map “this map of America shows the male/female sex ratio for all the states and counties — It's worth noting that, at a glance, the most populous counties in America seem to tilt towards female”. Upon further glance it may appear that a vast number of activity calendars have more programs geared for women than men. Activity calendars often do reflect a variety of feminine-based domestic activities such as cooking, baking or “unisex” geared activities. One might speculate that Activity Directors focus on meeting the needs of the majority (female) residents but it is more the case of how much more challenging it is to create male oriented programs than it is for the female persuasion. Consider some of the following factors that contribute to the increased challenge in planning for men’s activities. Of the less than 30% of male residents in Long Term Care facilities, approximately 1/3 of the population present with less ability to communicate than women due to their respective medical or mental status. Some men suffer from strong fear of failure; particularly relating to starting a new skill in which they may appear incompetent to others. Men of past generations may feel embarrassed or self consciousness relating to their particular disability and how it may cause unsuccessful outcomes. Career responsibilities that have long since pasted may leave a sense of loss or void that may damage self-esteem, and instill feelings of uselessness. All of the above are useful information when planning for men’s activities but are only a fraction of the possible scenarios that today’s Activity Director needs to consider while planning for a balanced and purposeful activity calendar. Additionally, there are lifestyle differences that contribute to men’s personal attitudes regarding leisure pursuits between white collars versus blue collar workers. White collar workers engaged in less physical job related labor, shorter work hours and benefited from higher paying salaries than blue collar laborers. Thus, white collar workers were more likely to feel more energetic, have additional time in the day for leisure choices and possessed the financial means that allowed him to select from a range of interests and pursuits. Below are some considerations that may help you to best identify how to plan for men’s activities, specific to Blue Collar Workers. Men put in exhaustive long hours and often were left with little or no time for leisure pursuits thus they tend to be lacking in leisure related skills. What little available free time in any given day was spent with family members, particularly with their children. Minimal earnings did not allow for financial means to spend on leisure activities. Starting Point – the assessment /gender reviewed: Most likely you already have a standardized assessment form. Take some time to review your assessment form and activity check sheet and take note of the types of activities that may be more specific to male residents. You can create a framework of questions that will help you probe for more details regarding his preferences. As you check those areas of interest expressed by your resident make it your mission to elicit and document more information describing what makes his specific selection particularly appealing. Example - Resident selects Sailing: Questions to ask: Can you describe what your sailboat looked like? Where is your favorite sailing destination? What time of day do you like go sailing? Who do you like to be with when you go sailing? How often did you go sailing? How do you take care of your sailboat? Your resident’s answers can be used to engage him in a conversation at a later time about this past time experience and will aide in re-affirming a particularly meaningful memory. Men of this generation often thoroughly enjoy exchanging stories of past days of glory, sports or children and grandchildren’s accomplishments. Look within your male population to group residents with common denominators that you can foster in friendship and mutual camaraderie. Once you incorporate your residents noted interest/s in the activity calendar and highlight care plan objectives you are well on your way to providing for the needs and interests of your resident as a unique individual within the facility community - thereby meeting federal laws for nursing homes. Men might be the minority in this club but given the opportunity, appropriate resources and a thorough comprehensive assessment, men may not only be able to participate but contribute greatly by adding to the overall program enrichment through a well balanced activity calendar schedule. NOTE: Although the Activity Director professional will primarily focus on planning these activities keep in mind that the ALL staff members are charged with ensuring that the needs and interests of each individual is met to attain or maintain the highest practical physical, mental, and psychosocial quality of life possible. Such programs are essential to the health and well being of all men and women living in Long Term Care facilities today. Below are a number of ideas for your consideration but remember, that you’re objective is to find a “match” between your resident’s needs and interests to the many potential ideas you come across. Train Hobby Club – The collection for the train hobbyist is numerous, everything from the train itself to the landscape and surrounding villages will keep your resident busy. Look for a location in the facility where you can leave the train convoy permanently set up for residents to watch throughout the day. Men’s Choral Group – Rehearse all time men’s favorite songs to musical accompaniment or acapella style. Let your residents listen to past male entertainment groups (Miracles, The Four Tops, The Platters, etc.) Car Talk – Collect car magazines and new car brochures and solicit a discussion about new cars vs. the old cars, foreign vs. domestic, manual vs. automatic transmission, 2-door, 4-door, convertibles, etc. Car Wash – A simple hose, bucket, soap, sponges, and towels is all that’s needed. Solicit facility staff members to volunteer their car for washing. Each resident may choose whether to wash, rinse, dry, or just watch the scrubbing and polishing busy work. Rope Tying – Former professionals and wanna-be ship mates will enjoy trying and re-trying various rope techniques to get it right - while sharing sea worthy tales. If there is no sea captain in the crowd just purchase the many rope tying teaching books out there and dawn your sailor hat to get the ship moving. Santa's Workshop – Doll houses, airplanes, train kits, bird house, mailboxes etc., make for a super great Santa Shop assembly line. Finished product can be donated to non-profit organizations such as Toys for Tots during the holidays. Your men will love knowing how meaningful their labor of love will be to a child. Sports Time – Watching a live or a pre-recorded horse race, ballgame, boxing match on a big-screen will get the crowd in the mood. Set out peanuts, popcorn, and pretzels. Serve non-alcoholic beer and soda. NOTE: Keep in mind any issue with potential chocking risk/consult with nursing. Competitors Club – Horseshoes, bean bag tosses, badminton, bocce ball, and balloon toss are fun games that involve a lot of movement while encouraging interaction, socialization, and teamwork. At the Movies – Ask the residents to select a film (a western, war movie, or mystery). Schedule a matinee or an evening showing. Supply hot-buttered popcorn, movie-style candy, and soda (if permissible- relating to potential chocking/consult with nursing). NOTE: War movies may be triggering for some residents. Be sure to vet your residents for potential behavior relating to aggression that may be triggered from viewing war movies. Honoring Veterans – Military veterans are often eager to exchange stories about the war days as a way to bond and honor veterans and the past memories. Create a list of “military positions” held by your residents and post in an easily visible location to honor their service. Casino Night – Organize a game of dominoes, checkers, chess, or a card game (poker or Blackjack). Be sure to decorate with all the ambiance and glitz and glamour to set the tone. Arches ranging from roulette wheel to gleaming gold circle to let the residents make an entrance. Tool Bits – Provide a variety of different sized nuts, bolts, and washers and a few empty containers. Either direct the resident to sort the items or assemble the items and start up a conversation and provide pictures about what each item might be used to make. NOTE: Be aware if there is any evidence whereas you believe that your resident may want to ingest non-consumable items. Trade Show – Journey out to a local hardware store, such as Home Depot or Lowe’s. Make a project list and ask the men to find the supplies to complete the job. Many men enjoy discovering new tools and many will spend countless hours at a hardware or home-improvement center. Shoe Shine – Contact a local shoe shop to enlist the tradesman to come to the facility to show off his craft to the men of the house. Your residents can wear their Sunday best shoes for this shoe renovation. Offer newspapers, magazines, books for reading while resident shoes get a new lease on life. The smell of shoe polish may evoke memories and provide opportunities to reminisce. Card or Coin Collection Club – Many men collected and traded baseball cards or coins when they were young. Gather a collection of baseball cards or coins and set up a sorting/organizing station. Obtain detailed information about the items to share with the residents. Encourage the men to talk about their baseball or coin favorites and share how they acquired their treasures. Career Day – Gather a collection of photographs with a focus on jobs, occupations, and careers. (Also consider: colleges, military service, sports activities, clubs or organizations, hobbies or leisure activities.) Encourage the resident to discuss the photographs and their past employment. Pass around various hats representing different careers and ask residents to talk about which occupation they think the hat belongs to. Share information about each career such as, educational requirements and potential earnings. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  12. M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP 10yr Instructor for the Activity Directors Network has written a guideline to help you with your Men residents. Men have always been a topic of discussion when it comes to planning Activities. Read through this guide and let us know what your best success with Mens Activities are..... Activities for Men . . . . January 08, 2019 While walking through most Long Term Care facilities you will easily take note that the ratio of female versus male residents is significantly tipped towards the female population. Women residents outnumber men at the rate of about 2 to 1 (partly due to the fact women live longer than men). Contributing factors that tip the scale further is that it is not uncommon to find that approximately 80% of the staff is also female and the majority of visitors in general are female as well. Men are simply outnumbered in Long Term Care facilities. ref: http://digg.com/2017/sex-ratio-america-map “this map of America shows the male/female sex ratio for all the states and counties — It's worth noting that, at a glance, the most populous counties in America seem to tilt towards female”. Upon further glance it may appear that a vast number of activity calendars have more programs geared for women than men. Activity calendars often do reflect a variety of feminine-based domestic activities such as cooking, baking or “unisex” geared activities. One might speculate that Activity Directors focus on meeting the needs of the majority (female) residents but it is more the case of how much more challenging it is to create male oriented programs than it is for the female persuasion. Consider some of the following factors that contribute to the increased challenge in planning for men’s activities. Of the less than 30% of male residents in Long Term Care facilities, approximately 1/3 of the population present with less ability to communicate than women due to their respective medical or mental status. Some men suffer from strong fear of failure; particularly relating to starting a new skill in which they may appear incompetent to others. Men of past generations may feel embarrassed or self consciousness relating to their particular disability and how it may cause unsuccessful outcomes. Career responsibilities that have long since pasted may leave a sense of loss or void that may damage self-esteem, and instill feelings of uselessness. All of the above are useful information when planning for men’s activities but are only a fraction of the possible scenarios that today’s Activity Director needs to consider while planning for a balanced and purposeful activity calendar. Additionally, there are lifestyle differences that contribute to men’s personal attitudes regarding leisure pursuits between white collars versus blue collar workers. White collar workers engaged in less physical job related labor, shorter work d hours and benefited from higher paying salaries than blue collar laborers. Thus, white collar workers were more likely to feel more energetic, have additional time in the day for leisure choices and possessed the financial means that allowed him to select from a range of interests and pursuits. Below are some considerations that may help you to best identify how to plan for men’s activities, specific to Blue Collar Workers. Men put in exhaustive long hours and often were left with little or no time for leisure pursuits thus they tend to be lacking in leisure related skills. What little available free time in any given day was spent with family members, particularly with their children. Minimal earnings did not allow for financial means to spend on leisure activities. Starting Point – the assessment /gender reviewed Most likely you already have a standardized assessment form. Take some time to review your assessment form and activity check sheet and take note of the types of activities that may be more specific to male residents. You can create a framework of questions that will help you probe for more details regarding his preferences. As you check those areas of interest expressed by your resident make it your mission to elicit and document more information describing what makes his specific selection particularly appealing. Example - Resident selects Sailing: Questions to ask: Can you describe what your sailboat looked like? Where is your favorite sailing destination? What time of day do you like go sailing? Who do you like to be with when you go sailing? How often did you go sailing? How do you take care of your sailboat? Your resident’s answers can be used to engage him in a conversation at a later time about this past time experience and will aide in re-affirming a particularly meaningful memory. Men of this generation often thoroughly enjoy exchanging stories of past days of glory, sports or children and grandchildren’s accomplishments. Look within your male population to group residents with common denominators that you can foster in friendship and mutual camaraderie. Once you incorporate your residents’ noted interest in the activity calendar and highlight care plan objectives you are well on your way to providing for the needs and interests of your resident as a unique individual within the facility community - thereby meeting federal laws for nursing homes. Men might be the minority in this club but given the opportunity, appropriate resources and a through comprehensive assessment, men may not only be able to participate but contribute greatly by adding to the overall program enrichment through a well balanced activity calendar schedule. NOTE: Although the Activity Director professional who will focus on planning these activities keep in mind that the ALL staff members are charged with ensuring that the needs and interests of each individual is met to attain or maintain the highest practical physical, mental, and psychosocial quality of life possible. Such programs are essential to the health and well being of all men and women living in Long Term Care facilities today. Below are a number of ideas for your consideration but remember, that you’re objective is to find a “match” between your resident’s needs and interests to the many potential ideas you come across. Train Hobby Club – The collection for the train hobbyist is numerous, everything from the train itself to the landscape and surrounding villages will keep your resident busy. Look for a location in the facility where you can leave the train convoy permanently set up for residents to watch throughout the day. Men’s Choral Group – Rehearse all time men’s favorite songs to musical accompaniment or a Capella style. Let your residents listen to past male entertainment groups (Miracles, The Four Tops, The Platters, etc.) Car Talk – Collect car magazines and new car brochures and solicit a discussion about new cars vs. the old cars, foreign vs. domestic, manual vs. automatic transmission, 2-door, 4-door, convertibles, etc. Car Wash – A simple hose, bucket, soap, sponges, and towels is all that’s needed. Solicit facility staff members to volunteer their car for washing. Each resident may choose whether to wash, rinse, dry, or just watch the scrubbing and polishing busy work. Rope Tying – Former professionals and wanna-be ship mates will enjoy trying and re-trying various rope techniques to get it right - while sharing sea worthy tales. If there is no sea captain in the crowd just purchase the many rope tying teaching books out there and dawn your sailor hat to get the ship moving. Santas Workshop – Doll houses, airplanes, train kits, bird house, mailboxes etc., make for a super great Santa Shop assembly line. Finished product can be donated to non-profit organizations such as Toys for Tots during the holidays. Your men will love knowing how meaningful their labor of love will be to a child. Sports Time – Watching a live or a pre-recorded horse race, ballgame, boxing match on a big-screen will get the crowd in the mood. Set out peanuts, popcorn, and pretzels. Serve non-alcoholic beer and soda. NOTE: keep in mind any issue with potential chocking risk/consult with nursing. Competitors Club – Horseshoes, bean bag tosses, badminton, and bocce ball, balloon toss are fun games that involve a lot of movement while encouraging interaction, socialization, and teamwork. At the Movies – Ask the residents to select a film (a western, war movie, or mystery). Schedule a matinee or an evening showing. Supply hot-buttered popcorn, movie-style candy, and soda (if permissible- relating to potential chocking/consult with nursing). NOTE: War movies may be triggering for some residents. Be sure to vet your residents for potential behavior relating to aggression that may be triggered from viewing war movies. Honoring Veterans – Military veterans are often eager to exchange stories about the war days as a way to bond and honor veterans and the past memories. Create a list of “military positions” held by your resident and post in an easily visible location to honor their service. Casino Night – Organize a game of dominoes, checkers, chess, or a card game (poker or Blackjack). Be sure to decorate with all the ambiance and glitz and glamour to set the tone. Arches ranging from roulette wheel to gleaming gold circle to let the residents make an entrance. Tool Bits – Provide a variety of different sized nuts, bolts, and washers and a few empty containers. Either direct the person to sort the items or assemble the items and start up a conversation and provide pictures about what each item might be used to make. NOTE: Be aware if there is any evidence whereas you believe that your resident may want to ingest non-consumable items. Trade Show – Journey out to a local hardware store, such as Home Depot or Lowe’s. Make a project list and ask the men to find the supplies to complete the job. Many men enjoy discovering new tools and many will spend countless hours at a hardware or home-improvement center. Shoe Shine – Contac a local shoe shop to enlist the tradesman to come to the facility to show off his craft to the men of the house. Your residents can wear their Sunday best shoes for this shoe renovation. Offer newspapers, magazines, books for reading while resident shoes get a new lease on life. The smell of shoe polish may evoke memories and provide opportunities to reminisce. Card or Coin Collection Club – Many men collected and traded baseball cards or coins when they were young. Gather a collection of baseball cards or coins and set up a sorting/organizing station. Obtain detailed information about the items to share with the residents. Encourage the men to talk about their baseball or coin favorites and share how they acquired their treasures. Career Day – Gather a collection of photographs with a focus on jobs, occupations, and careers. (Also consider: colleges, military service, sports activities, clubs or organizations, hobbies or leisure activities.) Encourage the person to discuss the photographs and their past employment. Pass around various hats representing different careers and ask residents to talk about which occupation they think the hat belongs to. Share information about each career such as, educational requirements and potential earnings. M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP Activity Directors Network - MEPAP 1&2 Begins the 1st Tuesday of every month. ActivityDirector.org 1.888.ADU.0444
  13. Holiday Mindfulness …….. Author: M. Celeste Chase AC-BC, ACC, CDP Activity Directors Network - ActivityDirector.org 11/14/2018 The holidays are an emotional time, a time in when our focus is on connecting and making memories with the ones that mean the most to us. It is a time typically filled with joy and cheer as well as happy anticipation. Many of us will take time off from work to give ourselves more leisure time to enjoy those magical moments of gift giving and receiving, enjoy friends and family gatherings and a take part of bountiful food set upon the table. The magical component about annual events such as holidays and birthdays, is that they leave us with an indelible hall marker – a framed still picture of sorts; left behind to lead us back to what that moment represented. Although we may forget what that still picture looked like with the passing of time, we do not lose the ability to sense how we felt about that moment till long after. During the upcoming season, be mindful that aside from how the residents’ personal old history has colored their view of holiday or birthday events, he/she may also assimilated more (recent) new experiences related to the aging process itself that further changes the residents’ outlook and attitude about the upcoming holidays. Below listed just a few samples of emotional and physical issues that may greatly affect how the resident perceives his/her own quality of life. Limited mobility –Decreased ability to move around as they used to, now needing the help of a walker, a wheelchair, or is fragile and at risk of falling can hinder their ability to fully participate in the holiday celebration. Medical conditions like arthritis or previous injuries can prohibit full mobility so be mindful of how physical health can dampen the holiday spirit. Enlist a skilled professional to assess if medication management would be helpful if not already in place. Living in a Nursing Home or Assisted Living Facility – One of the greatest things about the holidays is enjoying your time at home. Many seniors mourn the loss of their home life and long for the comforts of their own home during the holidays and reminisce about the traditions created there over the years. Depression – It is important to note that sadness during the holiday season is a relatively normal experience for some seniors. However, if you have noticed that symptoms of depression are a year-round occurrence, it is important to take action and once again consult a skilled professional Recession – The recession hit some people very hard and many seniors are now living on a limited, fixed income. Your loved one may be upset that they cannot provide an abundant holiday like they used to and this may cause them to feel inadequate when it comes time for the family to unwrap their gifts. Seasonal Affective Disorder - The holiday season can trigger a seasonal depression (also known as seasonal affective disorder – SAD) that can take toll on their wellbeing. If depression is already a concern, seasonal depression will make the current problem worse. NOTE: Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) can include fatigue, desire to sleep more, apathy, desire to be left alone, low energy and weight gain due to carbohydrate cravings and depression. This condition must be clinically evaluated for appropriate treatment or interventions to be initiated. Loneliness is one of the most prevalent factors leading to depression during the holiday season. Over the years, the loved ones lost are mourned; loss of physical mobility is mourned often damaging our emotional wellbeing in a significant way. It is often enough sadness to leave anyone feeling down regardless of age. Be aware that elders tend to brush of or minimize how they are truly feeling. They may explain that they are having an “off day” simply because that they did not get enough sleep the night before or they may tell you that they are just getting over a cold or they may not actually really know why they are feeling out of sorts. Activity professionals need to tread gently with their own personal exuberance and excitement during this time of year and carefully listen to the cues that your resident will give you to help you better understand their needs. When your interpretation is accurate you will discover ways to create meaningful moments that will allow them to fully embrace and celebrate the holiday season once again. Here are some ideas for the holidays that might connect with your resident: Grow an amaryllis: Kits for these magnificent large blooms are plentiful at holiday time, and they come in many colors. The amaryllis grows significantly every day for weeks, so you can literally watch it get bigger from day to day. They grow into large blossoms and are stunning in a group. Facility Based Holiday craft fair: Here is an idea to make a craft fair event. Use your creative skills and make a dollar bill; “look-a-like” This is money that residents can use to make purchases at their very own facility holiday craft fair. Send a flyer to families and local communities to donate items for the fair. Each resident is given “look-a-like” money the day of the fair to make purchases. The generosity of others during the holiday is amazing and your resident’s reaction will be amazing too. Make a gingerbread house: Gingerbread houses are highly creative holiday activities for seniors and have all sorts of possibilities. You can tailor the process to your participants, using an easy kit, or baking the gingerbread from scratch and cutting it out from a pattern. You can even invite a professional baker to razzle and dazzle your residents. Tea Party holiday memories: Reading and discussing good books over a cup of tea always sparks meaningful engagement. Published holiday books are in an abundance to choose from. Make sure you have at least three possible book options, one of which might elicit a few laughs to ensure success. Sharing cultures: Holiday activities for many of us may cross a number of cultures and traditions. Almost everyone celebrates something during the winter months. You might invite your residents to decorate a designated area in their traditional cultural manner. Offer baked allow the residents to taste special foods, play special music, etc. The sharing of cultures can improve your residents’ sense of pride & celebrates his/her personal history & origins. “I once heard someone say that it was not helpful to be approached by a happy or cheery person at a time when they had personally been feeling out of sorts but that all changed when I tickled their funny bone and they found laughter again.” M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP ActivityDirector.org
  14. Internal Validation to Prevent Job Burnout …. Author : M. Celeste Chase AC-BC, ACC, CDP Activity Directors Network - ActivityDirector.org 10/24/2018 Many of us, admittedly most of us, look for some level of external feedback in the form of recognition to measure the importance of what we do. Feedback from our family, friends, business associates or coworkers helps us to develop a sense of personal and professional contribution. But all too frequently we give away our power to others to rate how successful we are while working to achieve our goals. The success of our own internal ability to self-motivate will increase or decrease greatly when those external sources say yah or nah to what we do often leading to a maker or breaker attitude. We can always count on our loved ones to give us what we need to succeed but that is not the expected scenario out there in the working world. It is neither rewarding nor any fun to toil away at a job where your efforts go unnoticed. You are especially prone to those influences when the elements of your work are demanding both physically and emotionally. GIVE YOURSELF PERMISSION Give yourself permission to find reward and value in what you do. When we are waiting for those external sources to find time during that busy work day to give us praise for work well done, we stand in pause, a momentary state of waiting for validation and responses to unanswered questions. Are we valued, are we not valued for our work? Did we do as well as we thought we did – did we do as well as we wanted to? Permit yourself to self-reflect and self-rate what you do first and then proceed to include the input from those outside sources. Establishing a sense of a job well done is the best way to prevent burnout. Ask yourself if your still leaving work at the end of the day feeling satisfaction and excitement upon the thought of returning back to work the next day. SEEK DIRECTION Before evaluation date, pursue a dialogue with your work supervisor to ask how you are doing. Your approach should not be defensive but rather should be to seek better understanding of what is expected and whether you are on the right track. Ask for clarification if need be so you can make clear plan of action to meet your job requirements. You will ensure that you remain on target to be in line to move into another position of more responsibility if you have aspirations to do so. You are looking to partner with your supervisor in a way that supports the overall mission & goals of your department. Your supervisor will remember & appreciate this meeting when your actual performance rating is scheduled. EDUCATION There is never a time when we have learned it all; regardless of what position of professional status one may achieved. Continued education is not only consistently required to maintain certifications but continues to provide one of the largely single greatest source of renewed interest in any given career path. Learning sparks introspective thought that provokes one to look for better and more current strategies to improve delivery and discover more effective ways to offer the services provided. Job burnout is often seen to take hold when work tasks become mundane in nature or otherwise automatic and lack the need for individualized thought process, thus, mind stimulation through continued education provides a pathway that may prevent that “same old same old” mind set. YOU ARE NOT ALONE – JOIN THE TEAM Protect yourself from that “it’s me and me alone” feeling. No one success story in any profession, business or leadership role, was ever accomplished by just one individual alone. Plans are devised policies & procedures are written but it takes the entire team to create a synergy – whereas; combined effect of the sum of all is greater than individual efforts. Remember … “IT TAKES A VILLAGE” Here are a few qualities that a successful team possess. Group focus on goals and mutual support of each other’s achievements Everyone contributes their fair share – jointly collaborating towards a common action plan The team offers each other support & develops natural synergy amongst the group Unity of individualized members creates a collaboration of diversity that creates success Good leadership is balanced by each individuals unique leadership style Look around for Validation Look for those rewards that which is not spoken; those quiet subtle nuances that speak volumes. You will see that in the smiles, it will present in the body language, it will be reflected in the positive behaviors and in the active engagement of those you serve. Take time at the end of each day or week to reflect on what went well and what didn’t go as well. This task helps you to recall both what you’re good at and why you do what you do. Concentrate on the positive to nourish your self esteem and self-validate your achievements. Those external sources charged with rating you in the work world will also see that you have that special quality – that capacity to improve the quality of life of others in a meaningful way. “Look to move away from the desire to obtain external validation; fulfillment, job burnout prevention and real validation will come from within and will always lead to a proven success story.” Internal Validation to Prevent Job Burnout …. Author : M. Celeste Chase AC-BC, ACC, CDP Activity Directors Network - ActivityDirector.org 10/24/2018
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