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  1. From what I read lately, it seems if we would all wear a mask, day in and day out we wouldn't catch the virus or spread it. just saying.. china stopped it completely in 60 days and now every citizen wears a mask, mandatory. They are all back to work and are not accepting people into their country without a quarantine.
  2. Fabric Glue.. is amazing.. back in the day, the craft shows were dominated by redesigned sweatshirts, flipped-over blue jean vest and flip-flops with every imaginable trinket glued to it. Fabric Glue would take the beating of washing and wearing.. Aleenes Fabric Glue , I used Gorilla Glue on several things and I think it would work good also.
  3. Here is a great Do It Yourself project. https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Cloth-Face-Mask/
  4. Here is a great resource put together by the NCCAP Click HERE for "Covid-19-activity-director-resources"
  5. Weve heard from several asking the exact same question. Most are working from a hall way, resident in doorways, masks, hallway bingo, beachball on a string. Some are having a hard time being heard thru a mask. Let us know what you are hearing and share it with us thanks Pennie
  6. Version 1.0.0

    23 downloads

    This form is designed to record your One on One Activity Programs from start to finish on paper, so that anyone assisting with an Activity would be able to conduct the event. This form includes the Opening and Closing dialogue to start and finish the activity. Setup, Supplies needed, Goals, Special considerations. Keep a logbook with all of your most frequently used Sensory / 1:1 activities in a folder incase your assistants or your volunteers need to conduct an Activity in your absense.

    Free

  7. 1 : 1 Activity Planning Form - DIY for Assistants or Volunteers View File This form is designed to record your One on One Activity Programs from start to finish on paper, so that anyone assisting with an Activity would be able to conduct the event. This form includes the Opening and Closing dialogue to start and finish the activity. Setup, Supplies needed, Goals, Special considerations. Keep a logbook with all of your most frequently used Sensory / 1:1 activities in a folder incase your assistants or your volunteers need to conduct an Activity in your absense. Submitter actnet Submitted 03/02/2020 Category Newsletters, Calendars, Forms, Puzzles, PrintOuts, FunFacts  
  8. Version 1.0.0

    20 downloads

    This form is designed to record your Activity Program from start to finish on paper, so that anyone assisting with an Activity would be able to conduct the event. This form includes the Opening and Closing dialogue to start and finish the activity. Setup and take down, Supplies needed, Length of program, Safety and considerations. Keep a logbook with all of your most frequent and most popular activities in a folder incase your assistants or your volunteers need to conduct an Activity in your absense.

    Free

  9. Group Activity Planning Form - DIY for Assistants or Volunteers View File This form is designed to record your Activity Program from start to finish on paper, so that anyone assisting with an Activity would be able to conduct the event. This form includes the Opening and Closing dialogue to start and finish the activity. Setup and take down, Supplies needed, Length of program, Safety and considerations. Keep a logbook with all of your most frequent and most popular activities in a folder incase your assistants or your volunteers need to conduct an Activity in your absense. Submitter actnet Submitted 03/02/2020 Category Newsletters, Calendars, Forms, Puzzles, PrintOuts, FunFacts  
  10. Supplies Socks Scissors (sharp enough to cut the sock material cleanly) Rice for stuffing (or an alternative of your choice) Twine or string Ribbon(s) A marker Tape (optional) Directions Step 1 Fill a sock with rice (or your choice of stuffing) up to the beginning of the heel. You can make your life a little easier by using the tape roll to hold the sock open while you stuff it (by passing the sock through, then folding the ankle of the sock back over the roll). The sock needs to be able to stand vertically on its own when stuffed. Step 2 Form a "pear" shape with more stuffing at the bottom than top. Pinch 2/3 of the way up the stuffed area to push the stuffing up into the heel and form separate head and body parts. The ankle of the sock above the "head" will be used to form the ears. Step 3 Tie off the sock immediately above the stuffing that forms the head using twine or string. This distinguishes the ears from the head. Ensure you tie it off tightly & securely as this will keep the stuffing in the sock. Step 4 Using another piece of twine or string, tie off the neck of the rabbit between the head and the body. Step 5 With the heel (which will become the face) facing toward you, cut down the center of the ankle of the sock to form the ears. Shape these as you wish by trimming material from the ankle – long and floppy, short and oval, asymmetric – it's your bunny! Step 6 Give your sock bunny eyes and a mouth with the marker, dots for the eyes and an X for the mouth work really well! Step 7 Add a ribbon around your bunny's neck, tying a bow to one side. You could also add a tail by pinching & tying off a small section with more twine. Activity Tip: You can easily add a couple of drops of essential oil for a twist. The scented bunny can then be placed at the bedside for therapeutic benefits. White Chocolate Easter Egg Candies Source: Taste of Home Ingredients 1 package (10 to 12 ounces) white baking chips 3 ounces cream cheese, cubed 1 teaspoon water 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract Colored sprinkles, colored sugar and/or jimmies Directions In a microwave-safe bowl, melt the chips at 50% power. Add the cream cheese, water and vanilla; stir until blended. Chill until easy to handle, about 1 hour. Quickly shape into 1-1/4-in. eggs. Roll in sprinkles, colored sugar or jimmies. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Movie Easter Eggs represent hidden items, words or images that are meant as a nod to something other then the movie content. They are super fun to spot and decode! Turn some of these popular Easter Eggs into an activity by having a watch party with your residents. There are tons of Movie Easter Eggs throughout cinema history. Research to find a wider selection of movies to choose from. Here are some to get you going from The Cinemaholic: Fight Club (1999) Fight Club tops the list of easter eggs in a movie with an epic reveal by David Fincher, the director of this timeless classic, saying "There is a Starbucks cup in EVERY scene of the movie". If you carefully go through each and every scene of the movie, you can really see a Starbucks cup, but you'll have to try hard. "There is at least one in every shot", confirmed Fincher. This was done by Fincher just out of respect for Starbucks that he loves. Toy Story (1995) Toy Story has so many references to Stanley Kubrick's The Shining. The carpet in the house has the exact pattern as the hotel in The Shining, the same where Danny plays with his toys. Get it? Also, the number 237 appears recurrently in the movie, a reference to Nicholson's room number which was the same. 237. Back to the Future (1985) The scene where Marty McFly takes the time-traveling car and goes back into the 50s, he crashes into a family farmhouse. There, the furious farmer calls his son Sherman, while the mailbox that his bullet hits has the name, Peabody. It is notable here that Sherman & Peabody are cartoon characters with time-travel machine. It is a brief shout out to those fellow time-travelers. Even the dog was Einstein. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) If one takes a closer look at the hieroglyphics of the well of souls in this Spielberg flick starring Harrison Ford, one can find the blurred versions of two familiar characters from Star Wars, R2-D2, and C-3P0. This egg was deliberately kept by Spielberg for the keen-eyed viewers to reward them. Read the Full Article Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident's individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351 Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
  11. Activity Directors Network Online Classroom Visit ActivityDirector.org or call us at 1.888.238.0444 Our Online MEPAP Classes start Next Tuesday March 3rd 2020 We are now enrolling! Activity Directors Network is the premiere online provider of the MEPAP classes with almost all of our students passing the NCCAP national exam. We have taught students from all 50 states, Canada and England. Activity Directors in Long Term Care, Nursing Homes, Assisted Living Facilities, Adult Daycare, Swing-Bed Hospital Care, Recreational Care and PACE programs can take the NCCAP MEPAP Courses. Our MEPAP 1 is the most widely accepted Activity Director Training course in the US. Make sure your Activity Staff is qualified before your next Survey, The Centers for Medicaid and Medicare (cms.gov) State Survey of Senior Care Facilities follow Federal Regulation F680-F679, Surveyors Guideline In most States this course meets all of the Minimum State Requirements under Federal regulation F680, Check with your State Regs and your facility for any additional Continuing Education requirements. ------------ Taking a course Online is a very interactive way to learn. Not only do you benefit from a professional Activity Director Instructor, You also share the knowledge and networking with your entire class. Our Classrooms Lead Instructor: Kathy Hughes ADC , has over 40 years of teaching the NCCAP Certification course experience, as one of the original MEPAP Certification Training Course Authors, Kathy has the "know how", the experience and the resources to train you and your staff to provide innovative activities to your residents as well as learn about the regulations that effect the delivery of activities. Our Guest Instructors - Swing-Bed Specialist, Ruth Martanis - Adult-Day Health Specialist, Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP Once you experience the Online Classroom setting you'll wonder why you didn't try this sooner. ----------- The 24/7 Chatroom and the Class Forum are just two of the ways each and every Student can reach out to the entire class to either ask for help, offer some advice or share their particular journey with the class. You will enjoy networking with activity professionals who share their ideas and knowledge throughout the course. Our online class lasts 4 months, a 180hr course, 90hrs Class Study/90hrs of Practicum (Fieldwork). ** Cost is $600 - Payment Plans are available. "If your facility is paying, simply sign our Purchase Order Agreement to verify payment, and start the class , we will wait on a Check . --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ask about our "Self-Paced Format" that will allow you to expedite the training or extend it out for a year to help accommodate a busy life..... !! To Get Started : visit ActivityDirector.org download the MEPAP 1 Enrollment Packet fill out the enrollment forms + purchase order if applicable. fax them in and you're ready to go. (fax 1+866-405-5724). Enrollment Packets >> click here>> 🔻MEPAP 1 🔻 MEPAP 2 ---------------------------------------- ** Click HERE to have the Enrollment Packet emailed to you. ---------------------------------------- Be sure and use our "Military Family Discount" $100 off any Military family EZ Payment Plans Available , use the Make a Payment option on https://activitydirector.org - Call or email us to set up a plan that will work for you! Email Us - admin@activitydirector.net Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of Our Network, Pennie The Behavioral Health Programming Guide is a "Must Have" for your facility. Not only does this comprehensive guide explain the new Behavioral Health Regs But it lays out a plan of action to keep your entire facility in Compliance. Learn to evaluate your residents for the most common BH issues Learn to classify and develop activities and careplans with measurable goals. Most of all make sure your facility is BH Ready for your next State Survey $14.95 - in the AD Store - Digital Download Written By : Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP
  12. Tweet +1 Hi Everyone!! Well it's only three weeks from today for our Great Irish Show of the Year! I can't wait and I hope you can't too! Ticket sales are percolating and I hope you've already got yours cause they're going to go very quickly when all our advertising breaks loose shortly in advance of the Holiday..! As you know from reading my letters we'll have an Irish Fiddler, Irish Step-dancers, an Irish Mandolinist/Banjo Player and of course our almost all Irish Comedians.. ! So get ready to have a Very Irish time! And don't forget if you're celebrating a birthday to tell us when making your reservations..we love celebrating birthdays!! Did you know that Blarney is as old as the Irish? It is only in relatively recent times that it acquired its own shrine in the Castle in County Cork. Each year some 70,000 blarney believers climb 120 feet in search of eloquence and hang upside down to kiss the stone. It is said that it will endow whoever kisses it the eternal "Gift of Gab". The seat of eloquence is a non descriptive block of limestone about 4 feet long, one foot wide and 9 inches high said to be worth about thirty million dollars. Who Knew? Did you also know? That there are now more Polish people in Ireland than there are native speakers of the original Irish language Gaelic. Or that.. The largest town in Ireland is Drogheda, with a population of 40,956 (up 6.2% since April 2011) A motorway in Ireland was delayed by 10 years and then rerouted to protect a tree that was thought to belong to fairies. Think that Los Angeles would ever do that? and lastly.. for my dog lovers.. Irish Wolfhounds are the tallest dog breed in the world. I've seen them they're huge! And your lrish Limerick for the week is.. Cosmetically Lil of Kilquade, Had beauty that ne'er seemed to fade, When tanned by the sun, She looked twenty-one, But she looked fifty-six in the shade. And now an Irish Toast! May all the Leprechauns be near you to spread luck along your way, and may all the Irish angels smile upon you on St.Pat's Day! My Toast.. Have a great week and smile upon all you meet! Always, or Mise Le Meas! (Sincerely in Gaelic) I Live to Laugh! Bonnie Barchichat Executive Producer Senior Comedy Afternoons.com GO HERE FOR TICKETS! 714-914.2565 Or CALL! P.S. Please share this email with friends who can use some more fun, laughter and sociability in their life. P.P.S. Sponsors.. If you're Senior Friendly and want to meet our Audience here's your opportunity! Drop me a line and say "tell me more!" www.Here's the Proud Bird! Don't forget to email me what you'd like to have for lunch! All orders must be in by March 9th! ©2020 Senior Comedy Afternoons LLC. | 2313 Nelson Avenue, Redondo Beach, Ca. 90278
  13. Hi. Swing bed regulations are the same as Skilled Nursing Home regulations. I am going to assume here that you are the OT and being asked to also do activities with your residents. The regulations for activities are FTag679 and Ftag680. Ftag679: §483.24(c) Activities. §483.24(c)(1) The facility must provide, based on the comprehensive assessment and care plan and the preferences of each resident, an ongoing program to support residents in their choice of activities, both facility-sponsored group and individual activities and independent activities, designed to meet the interests of and support the physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of each resident, encouraging both independence and interaction in the community. INTENT §483.24(c) To ensure that facilities implement an ongoing resident centered activities program that incorporates the resident's interests, hobbies and cultural preferences which is integral to maintaining and/or improving a resident's physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being and independence. To create opportunities for each resident to have a meaningful life by supporting his/her domains of wellness (security, autonomy, growth, connectedness, identity, joy and meaning). DEFINITIONS §483.24(c) "Activities" refer to any endeavor, other than routine ADLs, in which a resident participates that is intended to enhance her/his sense of well-being and to promote or enhance physical, cognitive, and emotional health. These include, but are not limited to, activities that promote self-esteem, pleasure, comfort, education, creativity, success, and independence. NOTE: ADL-related activities, such as manicures/pedicures, hair styling, and makeovers, may be considered part of the activities program. GUIDANCE §483.24(c) Research findings and the observations of positive resident outcomes confirm that activities are an integral component of residents' lives. Residents have indicated that daily life and involvement should be meaningful. Activities are meaningful when they reflect a person's interests and lifestyle, are enjoyable to the person, help the person to feel useful, and provide a sense of belonging. Maintaining contact and interaction with the community is an important aspect of a person's well-being and facilitates feelings of connectedness and self-esteem. Involvement in community includes interactions such as assisting the resident to maintain his/her ability to independently shop, attend the community theater, local concerts, library, and participate in community groups. Activity Approaches for Residents with Dementia All residents have a need for engagement in meaningful activities. For residents with dementia, the lack of engaging activities can cause boredom, loneliness and frustration, resulting in distress and agitation. Activities must be individualized and customized based on the resident's previous lifestyle (occupation, family, hobbies), preferences and comforts. https://www.caringkindnyc.org/_pdf/CaringKind-PalliativeCareGuidelines.pdf NOTE: References to non-CMS/HHS sources or sites on the Internet included above or later in this document are provided as a services and do not constitute or imply endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CMS or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. CMS is not responsible for the content of pages found at these sites. URL addresses were current at the date of this publication. The facility may have identified a resident's pattern of behavioral symptoms and may offer activity interventions, whenever possible, prior to the behavior occurring. Once a behavior escalates, activities may be less effective or may even cause further stress to the resident (some behaviors may be appropriate reactions to feelings of discomfort, pain, or embarrassment, such as aggressive behaviors exhibited by some residents with dementia during bathing16). Examples of activities-related interventions that a facility may provide to try to minimize distressed behavior may include, but are not limited, to the following: For the resident who exhibits unusual amounts of energy or walking without purpose: Providing a space and environmental cues that encourages physical exercise, decreases exit-seeking behavior and reduces extraneous stimulation (such as seating areas spaced along a walking path or garden; a setting in which the resident may manipulate objects; or a room with a calming atmosphere, for example, using music, light, and rocking chairs); Providing aroma(s)/aromatherapy that is/are pleasing and calming to the resident; and Validating the resident's feelings and words; engaging the resident in conversation about who or what they are seeking; and using one-to-one activities, such as reading to the resident or looking at familiar pictures and photo albums. For the resident who engages in behaviors not conducive with a therapeutic home like environment: Providing a calm, non-rushed environment, with structured, familiar activities such as folding, sorting, and matching; using one-to-one activities or small group activities that comfort the resident, such as their preferred music, walking quietly with the staff, a family member, or a friend; eating a favorite snack; looking at familiar pictures; Engaging in exercise and movement activities; and Exchanging self-stimulatory activity for a more socially-appropriate activity that uses the hands, if in a public space. For the resident who exhibits behavior that require a less stimulating environment to discontinue behaviors not welcomed by others sharing their social space: For the resident who goes through others' belongings: Using normalizing life activities such as stacking canned food onto shelves, folding laundry; offering sorting activities (e.g., sorting socks, ties or buttons); involving in organizing tasks (e.g., putting activity supplies away); providing rummage areas in plain sight, such as a dresser; and Using non-entry cues, such as "Do not disturb" signs or removable sashes, at the doors of other residents' rooms; providing locks to secure other resident's belongings (if requested). For the resident who has withdrawn from previous activity interests/customary routines and isolates self in room/bed most of the day: Providing activities just before or after meal time and where the meal is being served (out of the room); Providing in-room volunteer visits, music or videos of choice; Encouraging volunteer-type work that begins in the room and needs to be completed outside of the room, or a small group activity in the resident's room, if the resident agrees; working on failure-free activities, such as simple structured crafts or other activity with a friend; having the resident assist another person; Inviting to special events with a trusted peer or family/friend; Engaging in activities that give the resident a sense of value (e.g., intergenerational activities that emphasize the resident's oral history knowledge); Inviting resident to participate on facility committees; Inviting the resident outdoors; and Involving in gross motor exercises (e.g., aerobics, light weight training) to increase energy and uplift mood. For the resident who excessively seeks attention from staff and/or peers: Including in social programs, small group activities, service projects, with opportunities for leadership. For the resident who lacks awareness of personal safety, such as putting foreign objects in her/his mouth or who is self-destructive and tries to harm self by cutting or hitting self, head banging, or causing other injuries to self: Observing closely during activities, taking precautions with materials (e.g., avoiding sharp objects and small items that can be put into the mouth); Involving in smaller groups or one-to-one activities that use the hands (e.g., folding towels, putting together PVC tubing); Offering activities in which the resident can succeed, that are broken into simple steps, that involve small groups or are one-to-one activities such as using the computer, that are short and repetitive, and that are stopped if the resident becomes overwhelmed (reducing excessive noise such as from the television); Involving in familiar occupation-related activities. (A resident, if they desire, can do paid or volunteer work and the type of work would be included in the resident's plan of care, such as working outside the facility, sorting supplies, delivering resident mail, passing juice and snacks, refer to §483.10(e)(8) Resident Right to Work); Involving in physical activities such as walking, exercise or dancing, games or projects requiring strategy, planning, and concentration, such as model building, and creative programs such as music, art, dance or physically resistive activities, such as kneading clay, hammering, scrubbing, sanding, using a punching bag, using stretch bands, or lifting weights; and Slow exercises (e.g., slow tapping, clapping or drumming); rocking or swinging motions (including a rocking chair). Focusing attention on activities that are emotionally soothing, such as listening to music or talking about personal strengths and skills, followed by participation in related activities; and Focusing attention on physical activities, such as exercise. For the resident who has delusional and hallucinatory behavior that is stressful to her/him: Focusing the resident on activities that decrease stress and increase awareness of actual surroundings, such as familiar activities and physical activities; offering verbal reassurance, especially in terms of keeping the resident safe; and acknowledging that the resident's experience is real to her/him. The outcome for the resident, the decrease or elimination of the behavior, either validates the activity intervention or suggests the need for a new approach. The facility may use, but need not duplicate, information from other sources, such as the RAI/MDS assessment, including the CAAs, assessments by other disciplines, observation, and resident and family interviews. Other sources of relevant information include the resident's lifelong interests, spirituality, life roles, goals, strengths, needs and activity pursuit patterns and preferences. This assessment should be completed by or under the supervision of a qualified professional. NOTE: Some residents may be independently capable of pursuing their own activities without intervention from the facility. This information should be noted in the assessment and identified in the plan of care. Surveyors need to be aware that some facilities may take a non-traditional approach to activities. In nursing homes where culture change philosophy has been adopted, all staff may be trained as nurse aides or "universal workers," (workers with primary role but multiple duties outside of primary role)and may be responsible to provide activities, which may resemble those of a private home. The provision of activities should not be confined to a department, but rather may involve all staff interacting with residents. Residents, staff, and families should interact in ways that reflect daily life, instead of in formal activities programs. Residents may be more involved in the ongoing activities in their living area, such as care-planned approaches including chores, preparing foods, meeting with other residents to choose spontaneous activities, and leading an activity. It has been reported that, "some culture changed homes might not have a traditional activities calendar, and instead focus on community life to include activities." Instead of an "activities director," some homes have a Community Life Coordinator, a Community Developer, or other title for the individual directing the activities program. For more information on activities in homes changing to a resident-directed culture, the following websites are available as resources: www.pioneernetwork.net;www.qualitypartnersri.org; andwww.edenalt.org. INVESTIGATIVE SUMMARY Use the Activities Critical Element pathway and the guidance above to investigate concerns related to activities which are based on the resident's comprehensive assessment and care plan, and meet the resident's interests and preferences, and support his or her physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being. My suggestion is that you hire a per Diem person who would provide activities and you can be the consultant. Therefore you could plan activities and teach a staff member how to do the activities. Kathy Hughes, ActivityDirector.org
  14. Hi there is a good multi-departmental form that we created. The form allows other employees in other departments to document any activities they observe or setup after hours or on weekends. We kept a manila folder with forms taped to the back of the residents closet, we left some at the nurses station, front desk, on the One:One Cart etc... How often are 1:1's regulated for.. I dont believe that there is a Reg just for that. You should stop by and ask it your 1:1 residents need anything every day, You should probably spend activity time with each 1:1 resident, once or twice a month, if you work in a large population. Dont careplan yourself into a hole, You can always stop by more often if needed,
  15. Hi. the MEPAP II Week One has to do with the State Survey. Your facility should have a State visit every year. The Instructor first asks you to read the CMS.gov webpages on How the State Survey is conducted. Next she shows you 7 Assessments that the State Surveyors will use to determine if your Activity Program is meeting the needs of the Residents. QIS Survey, Resident Interview, Critical Pathways Questions (Questions the Surveyor will ask him or herself about each Activity they observe.) After you study the Survey Procedures, the Instructor presents you with a Sample Deficiency. fictitiously written up about your facility and asks you to write up a Plan of Correction using the Audit Tool Form ... What tasks are you going to provide to correct the deficiency? The Sample said the Activities did not meet the needs of the resident, the paperwork was old and so on... One task can be to address the paperwork, How long will it take? 1 Week, , Who needs to be involved? Dietary, Admin, AD how will you know its being done and its effective? care planning, progress notes... You should know this procedure backwards and forwards when in charge of the Activity Department. Contact the Instructor or her guest instructors for help.. All of their names and email addresses are listed on the top of the your classroom. Can anyone else add to this? Does anyone have a good plan of correction to share.. thanks Pennie..
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