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  1. Hi. Swing bed regulations are the same as Skilled Nursing Home regulations. I am going to assume here that you are the OT and being asked to also do activities with your residents. The regulations for activities are FTag679 and Ftag680. Ftag679: §483.24(c) Activities. §483.24(c)(1) The facility must provide, based on the comprehensive assessment and care plan and the preferences of each resident, an ongoing program to support residents in their choice of activities, both facility-sponsored group and individual activities and independent activities, designed to meet the interests of and support the physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of each resident, encouraging both independence and interaction in the community. INTENT §483.24(c) To ensure that facilities implement an ongoing resident centered activities program that incorporates the resident's interests, hobbies and cultural preferences which is integral to maintaining and/or improving a resident's physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being and independence. To create opportunities for each resident to have a meaningful life by supporting his/her domains of wellness (security, autonomy, growth, connectedness, identity, joy and meaning). DEFINITIONS §483.24(c) "Activities" refer to any endeavor, other than routine ADLs, in which a resident participates that is intended to enhance her/his sense of well-being and to promote or enhance physical, cognitive, and emotional health. These include, but are not limited to, activities that promote self-esteem, pleasure, comfort, education, creativity, success, and independence. NOTE: ADL-related activities, such as manicures/pedicures, hair styling, and makeovers, may be considered part of the activities program. GUIDANCE §483.24(c) Research findings and the observations of positive resident outcomes confirm that activities are an integral component of residents' lives. Residents have indicated that daily life and involvement should be meaningful. Activities are meaningful when they reflect a person's interests and lifestyle, are enjoyable to the person, help the person to feel useful, and provide a sense of belonging. Maintaining contact and interaction with the community is an important aspect of a person's well-being and facilitates feelings of connectedness and self-esteem. Involvement in community includes interactions such as assisting the resident to maintain his/her ability to independently shop, attend the community theater, local concerts, library, and participate in community groups. Activity Approaches for Residents with Dementia All residents have a need for engagement in meaningful activities. For residents with dementia, the lack of engaging activities can cause boredom, loneliness and frustration, resulting in distress and agitation. Activities must be individualized and customized based on the resident's previous lifestyle (occupation, family, hobbies), preferences and comforts. https://www.caringkindnyc.org/_pdf/CaringKind-PalliativeCareGuidelines.pdf NOTE: References to non-CMS/HHS sources or sites on the Internet included above or later in this document are provided as a services and do not constitute or imply endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CMS or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. CMS is not responsible for the content of pages found at these sites. URL addresses were current at the date of this publication. The facility may have identified a resident's pattern of behavioral symptoms and may offer activity interventions, whenever possible, prior to the behavior occurring. Once a behavior escalates, activities may be less effective or may even cause further stress to the resident (some behaviors may be appropriate reactions to feelings of discomfort, pain, or embarrassment, such as aggressive behaviors exhibited by some residents with dementia during bathing16). Examples of activities-related interventions that a facility may provide to try to minimize distressed behavior may include, but are not limited, to the following: For the resident who exhibits unusual amounts of energy or walking without purpose: Providing a space and environmental cues that encourages physical exercise, decreases exit-seeking behavior and reduces extraneous stimulation (such as seating areas spaced along a walking path or garden; a setting in which the resident may manipulate objects; or a room with a calming atmosphere, for example, using music, light, and rocking chairs); Providing aroma(s)/aromatherapy that is/are pleasing and calming to the resident; and Validating the resident's feelings and words; engaging the resident in conversation about who or what they are seeking; and using one-to-one activities, such as reading to the resident or looking at familiar pictures and photo albums. For the resident who engages in behaviors not conducive with a therapeutic home like environment: Providing a calm, non-rushed environment, with structured, familiar activities such as folding, sorting, and matching; using one-to-one activities or small group activities that comfort the resident, such as their preferred music, walking quietly with the staff, a family member, or a friend; eating a favorite snack; looking at familiar pictures; Engaging in exercise and movement activities; and Exchanging self-stimulatory activity for a more socially-appropriate activity that uses the hands, if in a public space. For the resident who exhibits behavior that require a less stimulating environment to discontinue behaviors not welcomed by others sharing their social space: For the resident who goes through others' belongings: Using normalizing life activities such as stacking canned food onto shelves, folding laundry; offering sorting activities (e.g., sorting socks, ties or buttons); involving in organizing tasks (e.g., putting activity supplies away); providing rummage areas in plain sight, such as a dresser; and Using non-entry cues, such as "Do not disturb" signs or removable sashes, at the doors of other residents' rooms; providing locks to secure other resident's belongings (if requested). For the resident who has withdrawn from previous activity interests/customary routines and isolates self in room/bed most of the day: Providing activities just before or after meal time and where the meal is being served (out of the room); Providing in-room volunteer visits, music or videos of choice; Encouraging volunteer-type work that begins in the room and needs to be completed outside of the room, or a small group activity in the resident's room, if the resident agrees; working on failure-free activities, such as simple structured crafts or other activity with a friend; having the resident assist another person; Inviting to special events with a trusted peer or family/friend; Engaging in activities that give the resident a sense of value (e.g., intergenerational activities that emphasize the resident's oral history knowledge); Inviting resident to participate on facility committees; Inviting the resident outdoors; and Involving in gross motor exercises (e.g., aerobics, light weight training) to increase energy and uplift mood. For the resident who excessively seeks attention from staff and/or peers: Including in social programs, small group activities, service projects, with opportunities for leadership. For the resident who lacks awareness of personal safety, such as putting foreign objects in her/his mouth or who is self-destructive and tries to harm self by cutting or hitting self, head banging, or causing other injuries to self: Observing closely during activities, taking precautions with materials (e.g., avoiding sharp objects and small items that can be put into the mouth); Involving in smaller groups or one-to-one activities that use the hands (e.g., folding towels, putting together PVC tubing); Offering activities in which the resident can succeed, that are broken into simple steps, that involve small groups or are one-to-one activities such as using the computer, that are short and repetitive, and that are stopped if the resident becomes overwhelmed (reducing excessive noise such as from the television); Involving in familiar occupation-related activities. (A resident, if they desire, can do paid or volunteer work and the type of work would be included in the resident's plan of care, such as working outside the facility, sorting supplies, delivering resident mail, passing juice and snacks, refer to §483.10(e)(8) Resident Right to Work); Involving in physical activities such as walking, exercise or dancing, games or projects requiring strategy, planning, and concentration, such as model building, and creative programs such as music, art, dance or physically resistive activities, such as kneading clay, hammering, scrubbing, sanding, using a punching bag, using stretch bands, or lifting weights; and Slow exercises (e.g., slow tapping, clapping or drumming); rocking or swinging motions (including a rocking chair). Focusing attention on activities that are emotionally soothing, such as listening to music or talking about personal strengths and skills, followed by participation in related activities; and Focusing attention on physical activities, such as exercise. For the resident who has delusional and hallucinatory behavior that is stressful to her/him: Focusing the resident on activities that decrease stress and increase awareness of actual surroundings, such as familiar activities and physical activities; offering verbal reassurance, especially in terms of keeping the resident safe; and acknowledging that the resident's experience is real to her/him. The outcome for the resident, the decrease or elimination of the behavior, either validates the activity intervention or suggests the need for a new approach. The facility may use, but need not duplicate, information from other sources, such as the RAI/MDS assessment, including the CAAs, assessments by other disciplines, observation, and resident and family interviews. Other sources of relevant information include the resident's lifelong interests, spirituality, life roles, goals, strengths, needs and activity pursuit patterns and preferences. This assessment should be completed by or under the supervision of a qualified professional. NOTE: Some residents may be independently capable of pursuing their own activities without intervention from the facility. This information should be noted in the assessment and identified in the plan of care. Surveyors need to be aware that some facilities may take a non-traditional approach to activities. In nursing homes where culture change philosophy has been adopted, all staff may be trained as nurse aides or "universal workers," (workers with primary role but multiple duties outside of primary role)and may be responsible to provide activities, which may resemble those of a private home. The provision of activities should not be confined to a department, but rather may involve all staff interacting with residents. Residents, staff, and families should interact in ways that reflect daily life, instead of in formal activities programs. Residents may be more involved in the ongoing activities in their living area, such as care-planned approaches including chores, preparing foods, meeting with other residents to choose spontaneous activities, and leading an activity. It has been reported that, "some culture changed homes might not have a traditional activities calendar, and instead focus on community life to include activities." Instead of an "activities director," some homes have a Community Life Coordinator, a Community Developer, or other title for the individual directing the activities program. For more information on activities in homes changing to a resident-directed culture, the following websites are available as resources: www.pioneernetwork.net;www.qualitypartnersri.org; andwww.edenalt.org. INVESTIGATIVE SUMMARY Use the Activities Critical Element pathway and the guidance above to investigate concerns related to activities which are based on the resident's comprehensive assessment and care plan, and meet the resident's interests and preferences, and support his or her physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being. My suggestion is that you hire a per Diem person who would provide activities and you can be the consultant. Therefore you could plan activities and teach a staff member how to do the activities. Kathy Hughes, ActivityDirector.org
  2. Hi there is a good multi-departmental form that we created. The form allows other employees in other departments to document any activities they observe or setup after hours or on weekends. We kept a manila folder with forms taped to the back of the residents closet, we left some at the nurses station, front desk, on the One:One Cart etc... How often are 1:1's regulated for.. I dont believe that there is a Reg just for that. You should stop by and ask it your 1:1 residents need anything every day, You should probably spend activity time with each 1:1 resident, once or twice a month, if you work in a large population. Dont careplan yourself into a hole, You can always stop by more often if needed,
  3. Hi. the MEPAP II Week One has to do with the State Survey. Your facility should have a State visit every year. The Instructor first asks you to read the CMS.gov webpages on How the State Survey is conducted. Next she shows you 7 Assessments that the State Surveyors will use to determine if your Activity Program is meeting the needs of the Residents. QIS Survey, Resident Interview, Critical Pathways Questions (Questions the Surveyor will ask him or herself about each Activity they observe.) After you study the Survey Procedures, the Instructor presents you with a Sample Deficiency. fictitiously written up about your facility and asks you to write up a Plan of Correction using the Audit Tool Form ... What tasks are you going to provide to correct the deficiency? The Sample said the Activities did not meet the needs of the resident, the paperwork was old and so on... One task can be to address the paperwork, How long will it take? 1 Week, , Who needs to be involved? Dietary, Admin, AD how will you know its being done and its effective? care planning, progress notes... You should know this procedure backwards and forwards when in charge of the Activity Department. Contact the Instructor or her guest instructors for help.. All of their names and email addresses are listed on the top of the your classroom. Can anyone else add to this? Does anyone have a good plan of correction to share.. thanks Pennie..
  4. Let All Good Friends take you on a journey back in time to your favorite oldies! Thank you, Mary Peck (631) 560-0701
  5. Communication: Verbal & Non-Verbal By: Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP Verbal Communication What you say and how you say it will have a tremendous impact on your success as a care provider. The spoken word has the power to heal and equally so, the power to hurt. Words guide, motivate and influence others. They convey our thoughts and all too easily can dramatically change the outcome of even the most well intentioned actions. Words can enlighten, uplift and bestow a sense of mutual understanding and lastly, particularly in healthcare, a spoken word is one of the singularly most potent treatments that will enable healthcare professionals to establish a trusting relationship with those they serve. One critical skill that should become you're standard daily practice is to introduce yourself each and every time during your interaction with your resident. You will be doing it many times throughout your workday, especially in the first few weeks of a resident's admission to the facility. Introduce yourself with a smile while pointing to your name badge to help residents remember your name until they become familiar with you. Address the resident by Mr./Mrs. and their last name. Residents who want you to use their first names will very quickly tell you what name they prefer; whether name or nickname. Never, never use terms like "sweetie" or "dear." A fair number of healthcare providers do this in an absent minded way not meaning to cause offense. It is often an unconscious pattern of speech that is, however, both undignified and unprofessional. Tone of Voice Use a relaxed and friendly tone of voice to create a relax atmosphere both for you and your resident. A relaxed tone will evoke assurance and help the resident to move beyond the initial introduction to feel confidence in your abilities. Keep the volume of your voice at a normal regular level unless hearing loss deficits have been noted in the resident's personal record. The elderly with hearing difficulties are hesitant to ask you to repeat what you just said. Often they will default to "lip-reading" to fill in the gaps of missing words to better understand what others are saying. Observe the residents reaction closely and utilize body language interpretation to your advantage to gauge whether the resident fully comprehends what is being asked of him/her. NOTE: Never shout; it raises the pitch of your voice. Many older people lose the ability to hear high-pitched sounds. That is why many older people tell you they can understand a man's voice better than a woman's voice. Listening is extremely important. It is often more important to "sit-a-spell" and quietly focus on what the resident is trying to tell you than it is for you to continue speaking. The elderly often take longer to react as well as express themselves. Give your resident ample time to respond to your questions or comments. Non-Verbal Communication Body language is a nonverbal communication in which physical behaviors, as opposed to words, are used to express or convey information, thoughts and lastly, intent. Self-awareness of personal body language goes hand-in-hand with the verbal word spoken and is particularly pertinent to professionals in the field of healthcare. In addition, non-verbal body language must always openly invite an exchange and collaboration with others. NOTE: Humans have the capacity to unconsciously and instinctively assess their environment for safety at all times. The brain has the ability to translate an impending threat to personal safety from nonverbal cues in a fifth of a second faster than verbal ones. Don't let your unconscious body language send the wrong message to your resident. Residents who believe their providers lack interest in their personal care are more likely to withhold valuable information that could be beneficial to their health and well being. Body movements and posture while approaching your resident will speak volumes as to whether those you approach will consider you "friend" or "foe." Body posture provides nonverbal cues that project what we are thinking and feeling well before any words are spoken. Understanding body language leads to resident satisfaction and understanding. Is your body language sending the right message? NOTE: Even people with severe memory problems that have difficulty understanding what you say can retain the ability to "read" your body language. Negative Body Language (often expressing displeasure): frowning, raising eyebrow and folding our arms over our chest. Try to do a bit of personal self-observance and catch yourself and what your body language is telling others. Crossed Arms and/or Legs: This is such a clear indicator of disinterest that some experts recommend actually ending a meeting or conversation if you see one or more people lean back and cross their arms. Crossed legs may be a danger sign as well. Nodding too Many Times: Nodding is an essential part of communication and lets other people know you understand or agree with what they're saying. But doing it too many times can make you seem weak. It can also come across as a sign of indifference. Fidgeting: People fidget when they're uncomfortable or bored, so that's the signal you'll send if you're bouncing your leg or constantly messing with your hair. Read about more common body language mistakes: Source: https://www.businessinsider.com/21-common-body-language-mistakes-even-smart-people-make-2016-4#-3 Positive Body Language: It's important for your resident to feel that he/she is understood and that you are genuinely there for them, that you understand they will have questions and warmly welcome them. Positive body language invites further dialogue. Facial Expressions: Our facial expression offers a wealth of non-verbal information to listeners. The slightest movements can convey approval, disapproval, happiness, anger, fear or disgust. Use facial expressions to show an emotional response when your resident is speaking. If the message is concern, make sure to match your expression matches that message to show that you are listening with earnest and interest. Face Your Resident: This is often easier said than done. We are continuously reading charts, making notes, setting up equipment and making adjustments of nearly every kind on a daily basis so it can make it difficult to remind ourselves to "just breathe" and face your resident squarely. Be aware that turning your back for prolonged periods gives the impression that you are intentionally avoiding your resident. Lean Forward and Nod: This gesture signals that you are interested in what your resident has to say. The most effective way to show that you are engaged in the conversation at hand is to nod your head at appropriate time, and truly listen while someone else is speaking. https://www.nursesrx.com/nurse-news/what-your-body-language-is-telling-patients/ The Eyes: Establish eye contact with your resident. This means looking at the person to whom you are speaking. Eye contact tells the other person you are listening and that you mean what you are saying. Directly face your resident when you speak and be sure to position yourself to his/her eye level (example: if they are sitting, sit down next to them). Not enough eye contact: If you don't look the person in front of you in the eyes, he or she may unconsciously assume that you are being dishonest. Too much eye contact: Not looking someone in the eyes can make you seem dishonest, but looking them in the eyes for too long is usually a sign of aggression. To make people feel comfortable and trusting, hold their gaze for just a second or two at a time, but do it often. NOTE: Verbal and non-verbal language may have very different meanings in other cultures. Keep that in mind when dealing with people from different countries, or even other parts of this country. Effective communication that combines the skillful use of body language with verbal messages ensures that healthcare professionals foster positive interactions. This involves vigilant self-awareness for the healthcare professional about the spoken word, the extent to which you listen to others and the body language that you present. The combination of these basic elements will ensure positive communications and greatly influence trusting relationships between care provider and the population served. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org
  6. +1 Hi Everyone!! Or, As the Irish in Ireland say "Dia Dhuit! (May God Be With You!) I hope you're all having a great day wherever you are while you're reading this..because as we all know as evidenced by the sudden loss of Kobe Bryant that tomorrow is not a given..! So let's all make the best of every day as I try to do and live in the present..! Most problems are fears of the future. Or worries from the past. If you live in the present they don't exist. In the present you're alive as you can be.Your decisions are spontaneous, your heart is open. Your spirit is free! So. Let's Enjoy Life! The time is Now! And let's not think about our looming health crisis either with the Corona Virus.. can you believe that some people actually thought that it was caused by beer???! That really made me laugh!! I'm sure sales of Corona's went down for a time..Enough doom and gloom!! And speaking of the NOW tickets are NOW on SALE! Ahead of my aforementioned timeline of tomorrow..February 1! So.. feel free to go to my website or grab and envelope and let's plan on seeing each other on March 15th for a fabulous celebration of LIFE and LAUGHTER!! It's all set, you'll hear a masterful Irish Mandolinist/Banjo player upon entering, the room will be in Oh So Irish Green.. you know how i love to decorate! And then you'll be entertained by our wonderful Irish Dancers and our jaw dropping Irish fiddler and then our Almost All Irish comedians..'cept for Marty Ross who's as Irish as I am! Not! Nevertheless let's hear from you.. yes, group discounts apply for tables of 8 or more! I'm very excited to be bringing you this show as we can all use a great afternoon of fun.. and did i also mention prizes!! We'll have some of those too from our wonderful sponsors..! Irish Fun Facts.. Did you know? Ireland is responsible for a lot of inventions such as Color photography, Whiskey Distilling, Ejector Seats, Guided Missiles, Guinness, Hypodermic Syringes, Modern Tractors, Tanks, TransAtlantic Calls, Flavored Crisps, Portable defibrillator and Rubber-soled shoes. Bet you didn't know that.. neither did I!??! All for now, Have a Great Super Bowl Weekend! Always, or Mise Le Meas! (Sincerely in Gaelic) I Live to Laugh! Bonnie Barchichat Executive Producer Senior Comedy Afternoons.com 714-914.2565 P.S. Please share this email with friends who can use some more fun, laughter and sociability in their life and then please feel free to give me physical addresses to add on to our growing mailing list. Who doesn't like mail!? P.P.S. Sponsors.. If you're Senior Friendly and want to meet our Audience here's your opportunity! Drop me a line and say "tell me more!" www.Here's the Proud Bird! Don't forget to email me what you'd like to have for lunch! All orders must be in by March 9th! ©2020 Senior Comedy Afternoons LLC. | 2313 Nelson Avenue, Redondo Beach, Ca. 90278
  7. Activity Directors Network Online Classroom Visit ActivityDirector.org or call us at 1.888.238.0444 Our Online MEPAP Classes start Next Tuesday March 3rd 2020 We are now enrolling! Activity Directors Network is the premiere online provider of the MEPAP classes with almost all of our students passing the NCCAP national exam. We have taught students from all 50 states, Canada and England. Activity Directors in Long Term Care, Nursing Homes, Assisted Living Facilities, Adult Daycare, Swing-Bed Hospital Care, Recreational Care and PACE programs can take the NCCAP MEPAP Courses. Our MEPAP 1 is the most widely accepted Activity Director Training course in the US. Make sure your Activity Staff is qualified before your next Survey, The Centers for Medicaid and Medicare (cms.gov) State Survey of Senior Care Facilities follow Federal Regulation F680-F679, Surveyors Guideline In most States this course meets all of the Minimum State Requirements under Federal regulation F680, Check with your State Regs and your facility for any additional Continuing Education requirements. ------------ Taking a course Online is a very interactive way to learn. Not only do you benefit from a professional Activity Director Instructor, You also share the knowledge and networking with your entire class. Our Classrooms Lead Instructor: Kathy Hughes ADC , has over 40 years of teaching the NCCAP Certification course experience, as one of the original MEPAP Certification Training Course Authors, Kathy has the "know how", the experience and the resources to train you and your staff to provide innovative activities to your residents as well as learn about the regulations that effect the delivery of activities. Our Guest Instructors - Swing-Bed Specialist, Ruth Martanis - Adult-Day Health Specialist, Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP Once you experience the Online Classroom setting you'll wonder why you didn't try this sooner. ----------- The 24/7 Chatroom and the Class Forum are just two of the ways each and every Student can reach out to the entire class to either ask for help, offer some advice or share their particular journey with the class. You will enjoy networking with activity professionals who share their ideas and knowledge throughout the course. Our online class lasts 4 months, a 180hr course, 90hrs Class Study/90hrs of Practicum (Fieldwork). ** Cost is $600 - Payment Plans are available. "If your facility is paying, simply sign our Purchase Order Agreement to verify payment, and start the class , we will wait on a Check . --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ask about our "Self-Paced Format" that will allow you to expedite the training or extend it out for a year to help accommodate a busy life..... !! To Get Started : visit ActivityDirector.org download the MEPAP 1 Enrollment Packet fill out the enrollment forms + purchase order if applicable. fax them in and you're ready to go. (fax 1+866-405-5724). Enrollment Packets >> click here>> 🔻MEPAP 1 🔻 MEPAP 2 ---------------------------------------- ** Click HERE to have the Enrollment Packet emailed to you. ---------------------------------------- Be sure and use our "Military Family Discount" $100 off any Military family EZ Payment Plans Available , use the Make a Payment option on https://activitydirector.org - Call or email us to set up a plan that will work for you! Email Us - admin@activitydirector.net Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of Our Network, Pennie The Behavioral Health Programming Guide is a "Must Have" for your facility. Not only does this comprehensive guide explain the new Behavioral Health Regs But it lays out a plan of action to keep your entire facility in Compliance. Learn to evaluate your residents for the most common BH issues Learn to classify and develop activities and careplans with measurable goals. Most of all make sure your facility is BH Ready for your next State Survey $14.95 - in the AD Store - Digital Download Written By : Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP
  8. Hide and Seek Groundhog Shadow View File This File is a Groundhog Shadow .gif - Print several copies and hide them around your facility on Groundhogs day. The residents who find them are entitled to a prize.. Its a great intercom game for Groundhogs Day For your Newsletter: from Wikipedia ------------------- The weather lore was brought from German-speaking areas where the badger (German: Dachs) is the forecasting animal. This appears to be an enhanced version of the lore that clear weather on the Christian Holy Day of Candlemas forebodes a prolonged winter. The Groundhog Day ceremony held at Punxsutawney in western Pennsylvania, centering around a semi-mythical groundhog named Punxsutawney Phil is held on February 2nd. The tradition goes that Phil, the forecasting animal, will be emerging from its burrow on this day and if he sees his shadow due to clear weather, it will retreat to its den and winter will persist for six more weeks, and if he does not see his shadow because of cloudiness, spring will arrive early. While the tradition remains popular in modern times, studies have found no consistent correlation between a groundhog seeing its shadow or not and the subsequent arrival time of spring-like weather. Submitter actnet Submitted 01/25/2020 Category Newsletters, Calendars, Forms, Puzzles, PrintOuts, FunFacts  
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    This File is a Groundhog Shadow .gif - Print several copies and hide them around your facility on Groundhogs day. The residents who find them are entitled to a prize.. Its a great intercom game for Groundhogs Day For your Newsletter: from Wikipedia ------------------- The weather lore was brought from German-speaking areas where the badger (German: Dachs) is the forecasting animal. This appears to be an enhanced version of the lore that clear weather on the Christian Holy Day of Candlemas forebodes a prolonged winter. The Groundhog Day ceremony held at Punxsutawney in western Pennsylvania, centering around a semi-mythical groundhog named Punxsutawney Phil is held on February 2nd. The tradition goes that Phil, the forecasting animal, will be emerging from its burrow on this day and if he sees his shadow due to clear weather, it will retreat to its den and winter will persist for six more weeks, and if he does not see his shadow because of cloudiness, spring will arrive early. While the tradition remains popular in modern times, studies have found no consistent correlation between a groundhog seeing its shadow or not and the subsequent arrival time of spring-like weather.

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  10. Hi Everyone!! Well, it's Hot off the Press and now into your hot little computer screens ready to entice you into coming to our next exciting and tasty show! So feast your eyes on the two attachments I've enclosed and tell all your friends, family and neighbors that you're planning on going to our show! You'll be glad you did. Why not have your own clan at your own table too!?? I love the music and mirth of the Irish so we'll truly be having one heck of a party and a show! You won't want to miss it! And if.. you didn't get a chance to visit the Airplane Park at the Proud Bird at the last show they'll be a tour with a docent as soon as the show finishes waiting to tell you all about their WW2 Planes in their newly remodeled park! So... here's an Irish blessing to leave you with.. May the luck of the Irish lead to happiest heights and the highway you travel be lined with green lights! And here's an Irish Fun Fact..The City of Chicago has been dying its River GREEN since 1962, it starts the morning of the parade at 9 AM March 17th! Be Well! And..YES..tickets will go on- sale on-line February 1st... but if you can't wait and want to send a check in ahead of time.. feel free! Just don't forget to tell me what you'd like for lunch! Always, I Live to Laugh! Bonnie Barchichat Executive Producer Senior Comedy Afternoons.com 714-914.2565 P.S. Please share this email with friends who can use some more fun, laughter and sociability in their life and then please feel free to give me physical addresses to add on to our growing mailing list. Who doesn't like mail!? P.P.S. Sponsors.. If you're Senior Friendly and want to meet our Audience here's your opportunity! Drop me a line and say tell me more! www.Here's the Proud Bird! ©2020 Senior Comedy Afternoons LLC. | 2313 Nelson Avenue, Redondo Beach, Ca. 90278
  11. ActivityDirector.org has CE Courses Online. NCCAP PreApproved
  12. Giving Back: A Year of Charitable Activities Meaning and purpose in one’s life must be created and encouraged through selecting experiences and activities that feed the soul. To be in need is one of the most motivating factors in longevity and feeling joy. Being an Activity Director is in itself such a choice. We all seek to be of service. Perhaps the biggest barrier is not knowing where to start in this quest. This workshop is full of activity ideas to set you up for an entire year of charitable activities! Ongoing Activities are presented to guide you in creating activities that stretch out over the year, ensuring a more personal and lasting contribution to your community. Monthly Activities are provided to encourage fresh ways of giving back more frequently. I am certain you and your residents will make a real impact on the lives of those around you. Topics Covered: Health Benefits of Giving Ongoing Activities Monthly Activities Start Your Own Charity Ongoing Activity Example Pen Pals Program Summary: Create a Pen Pal Program where your residents can exchange letters, pictures, etc. with residents from another facility. Directions: Have all interested residents sign up so you have a head count. Create a form for each participant to sign stating they understand and agree to not use offensive language, inappropriate storytelling, and anything else you wish to use for your guidelines. Be sure and note in the form that you reserve the right to read any of their material for assurances if need be that way no one feels violated in the event you need to check. Once you have your list complete call some of your neighboring facilities and get your fellow Activity Director on board to do the same. You can then match residents at random and let the fun begin! Variation: Try creating the program with residents from a facility in a faraway state. This will allow for more interesting exchange of information. If your residents need help getting going you and your fellow Activity Director could come up with specific topics to cover for each given writing period. Topics can include childhood, first love, best friends, big adventures, parenthood, etc. Some of your residents may want to participate but are unable to physically write their letters. Ask some of your residents to volunteer their time and help them write their letters. Monthly Activity Example April National Pet Day - Few things break my heart quite like seeing an abandoned animal with no home to call their own. There is something about their innocence that makes any pain inflicted on them simply unbearable to me. You don’t have to be an animal lover to experience the desire to assist our fellow creatures. I am sure many of your resident’s feel that exact same way. There are some ways you can help that seem obvious, such as volunteering time at a shelter or donating animal food and toys or homemade dog biscuits to your local ASPCA, but there are also some ways you may not have thought about. I certainly didn’t until I was researching the topic for this course. These include: Recycle - Recycling your trash prevents it from filling a dump that then encroaches upon the natural habitat of countless animals. Don’t Litter - keeping your trash in cans and picking up other people’s litter prevent animals from ingesting any poison or choking hazards. It also prevents it from clogging up any waterways that are used like highways for creatures. Plant Native - Planting native plants all around your facility ensures that your local wildlife will thrive in their natural habitat. Not Tested on Animals - Make a policy to not purchase stuff for your department that has been tested on animals. Fresh Water - Make sure there are plenty of outside locations that provide fresh water for birds and such. Whichever avenue you choose to take be sure and create an educational activity around it where you can impart some wisdom about the animal/s you are trying to help. Knowledge is key and makes it harder to ignore those in need. This is true no matter the topic. Giving Back: A Year of Charitable Activities 5 CEs for $49.95 BUY NOW! BUY NOW! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  13. 1Your Rights and Protections as a Nursing Home Resident View File These are the Resident Rights as outlined by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid CMS.gov They pertain to Skilled Nursing Facilities , Long Term Care, Assisted Living, Adult Daycare etc. Print these out and make sure your residents know their rights. Submitter actnet Submitted 12/07/2019 Category Activity Director Documentation & Regulation Forms  
  14. Generation Z is pulling a Z snap on Baby Boomers and in true Generation Z fashion, there’s a meme about it. ‘OK, Boomer’ is popping up everywhere on the Internet as a clap back to all the Boomers’ criticism of the younger generation. The Boomers have been vocal in dismissing Generation Z as a privileged, lazy population with their heads up in the clouds. Accusations of wide spread Peter Pan Syndrome have been popularly noted and expressed from the older generation. Their judgements have not fallen on deaf ears. The response from Generation Z is a message of anger and blame. Gen Z believes the Boomers are out of touch and to blame for the state of an alleged failing economy, environmental protections, political and human equanimity, and so forth. My Opinion I could never promote blame in any way. The only way to move forward is to focus forward. I believe there is many merits to both sides and collaboration would benefit us all. The experience and wisdom of the Boomer generation is something that cannot be devalued. Wisdom must never be ignored for evolution’s sake. The enthusiastic creativity generated by youthful dreaming is of equal value. Two parts that make a beautiful whole. Mother Theresa famously stated that she would never attend an anti-war rally. However, if invited to a peace rally she would attend without hesitations. I believe the path forward is to focus on the solution, as well. For Activity Directors, Inter-generational planning is one of the most important programs we can maintain to keep our residents healthy and full of life. How do we prevent generational divides from affecting our ability to bring people together? Truthfully, we almost have an obligation to at least try. Our place in the facility and the community positions us in one of the prime spots to have a real impact on healing the divide. Ways Forward Focus on Commonality The best place to start in any divide is to first focus on what is in common between the sides. This brings neutrality and a willingness to find friendship, for your purpose of building connections. Gen Z believes Boomers are unwilling to make changes and are stuck in their ways, so to speak. However, Boomers were responsible for the massive social changes that took place in the 60’s and 70’s. One could draw a straight line of positive change from the plight of their cause to the causes taking center stage now. It is all a dream of freedom in one form or another. Humans in general have that in common and it is a good place to start in your planning. What can you plan that would focus on this commonality? Is there a holiday you could utilize to educate on this common thread? Trade Wisdom Create an environment where wisdom is traded and therefore valued. Your facility is stocked with almost all generations. Host workshops where different talents are shared. Younger individuals can teach a short lesson on using technology. Your residents can teach on history, taxes, carving, stamp collecting, etc. Most talents are dictated by the era in which one is raised. Utilize this to bring people together. What’s old is new. Get Real We all have stereo types. We all have judgments. This is a built in system meant to keep us safe and sometimes it goes overboard. This is a fact we shouldn’t work against. The important thing is to end all discussions of conflict with a solution put forward. Have group discussions with your residents about their grievances. Listen to their frustrations about the world as it is now. Of course, it is frustrating to watch the younger generation disappear into a sea of screens. It is equally frustrating to look back and see no action being taken to prevent some of the biggest problems we all now must shoulder. Discuss these things. Read newspaper articles. Talk about this meme. Get real about what is happening. Then talk about solutions and highlight the positive. Talk about what ties us all together. BUY Now! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. http://ActivityDirector.org 1.888.238.0444 Our mailing address is: 2010 Hwy 190 W #120 Livingston Texas 77351
  15. Make a Difference Day October 26, 2019 by M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP This day is an unofficial secular holiday or observance focused on community service and volunteer efforts. Traditionally celebrated on the fourth Saturday in October since 1992. All across the United States volunteers perform projects for their community, for individuals in need and a number of charitable organizations. This October 26th millions of volunteers will come together to honor “Make a Difference Day.” This day is observed as one of the largest and most widely recognized days for community service efforts. Volunteers actively engage in environmental tasks, charity fund raising such as bake sales local food banks, donate their time to nursing homes and women’s safe haven centers, and a host of many other activities. Not only to celebrate but to create awareness that people can truly make a difference when joining forces with actions to improve the quality of life for so many individuals. One of the most rewarding things about “Make a Difference Day” is that it matters not the volunteer age or background, we can all help others. We can give back to the communities and profoundly change the world. Senior Volunteer Programs do Making a Difference Older adults participating in volunteer programs will find it extremely rewarding on a number of levels. While there are a variety of groups and places the older adult can choose to support, the choice is often based more so on becoming involved in something that allows the volunteer to feel useful once again. The rewards gained from acceptance while volunteering to help others is immeasurable and as a whole, the wise elder appreciates and benefits tremendously from the experience. Whether it’s within their own nursing home, community center, adult day health center, or assisted living facility there are so many avenues and opportunities for older adults to really “make a difference” through volunteer services. Note: Adults over the age of 55 comprised nearly 36% of the 62.6 million volunteers, with 10% of the volunteers being 75 years old or older. https://www.leisurecare.com/resources/benefits-of-volunteering-seniors/ Volunteering Benefits Volunteering has important emotional and physical health benefits for the volunteer – especially when that volunteer happens to be an older adult. Depending on availability of time and the level of energy your resident possesses, you will find plenty of ways for seniors to experience the benefits from volunteering opportunities. Here’s a list of just a few possibilities and their respective benefits: Children - Teach them well. We all know that seniors are great stories tellers. Pair your residents up with youngsters by holding an Intergenerational Program. Seniors can volunteer during story hour and tell the little ones about history because they’ve lived through it firsthand. Who does not love to hear wonderful accounts of days of the past filled with curiosity and adventure? Additionally, children whom otherwise may not have previous experience with elders will learn to accept those imperfections that come with aging and come to respect and value the elder’s wisdom. Pay It Forward – The resident as a student then becomes the teacher. Plan to kick leisure pursuits up a notch by creating a “resident to resident volunteer program.” This would be one to one or small groups. Encourage those elders that have learned new found skills in technology, crafting, cooking, etc. to share what they have learned with their fellow residents. It is an opportunity for your resident to pay it forward. This is a dual benefiting experience both for the resident sharing knowledge and the resident learning something new. The added bonus it that it makes way for wonderful resident friendships. Supporting the Community - Volunteering for organizations and services gets seniors out into the community and is a great way to instill a sense of purpose and responsibility while also encouraging social engagement and friendships. A recent study of adults over the age of 60 who volunteer reported higher levels of well-being and lower disability than those who did not volunteer. Note: Current regulations specify that community involvement opportunities must be in place within senior care facilities. Where Seniors can Volunteer If you want to volunteer with seniors you can contact a number of services and programs within your local area. If you’re not sure where to go there are many organizations that can help you find a place where your older adults’ services are needed. Here’s a look at some to contact: Elder Helpers National Council on Aging AARP Volunteer Match Volunteers of America Meals on Wheels One Foster Grandparent's Rebound Anna Nelson, 70, a Foster Grandparent volunteer with five- and six-year-olds in Knoxville, Tenn., for the past three years, can attest to the study’s results. “I’m not depressed anymore. My blood pressure has come down. My blood work is now normal. My cholesterol level is down,” said Nelson, one of 500 Senior Corps volunteers in Knoxville. In addition, Nelson said, “I’ve lost weight from being more active with the kids. They get me moving.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2019/03/12/the-volunteering-that-makes-people-55-healthier/#7672e1cde5e8 Note: According to the Corporation for National Community & Service, the most common forms of volunteering are: Collecting, serving, preparing, or distributing food Fundraising or selling items to raise money Engaging in general labor, like helping build homes or clean up parks Tutoring or teaching Mentoring the youth Collecting, making, or distributing clothing No matter if it’s walking dogs at the local Humane Society, building a home for Habitat for Humanity or restocking books at the local library, volunteering keeps seniors physically active. Maintaining physical fitness and an active lifestyle can prevent a number of injuries and prevent or delay the onset of some diseases. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org BUY Now Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
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