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  1. Hi Everyone!! Well, it's Hot off the Press and now into your hot little computer screens ready to entice you into coming to our next exciting and tasty show! So feast your eyes on the two attachments I've enclosed and tell all your friends, family and neighbors that you're planning on going to our show! You'll be glad you did. Why not have your own clan at your own table too!?? I love the music and mirth of the Irish so we'll truly be having one heck of a party and a show! You won't want to miss it! And if.. you didn't get a chance to visit the Airplane Park at the Proud Bird at the last show they'll be a tour with a docent as soon as the show finishes waiting to tell you all about their WW2 Planes in their newly remodeled park! So... here's an Irish blessing to leave you with.. May the luck of the Irish lead to happiest heights and the highway you travel be lined with green lights! And here's an Irish Fun Fact..The City of Chicago has been dying its River GREEN since 1962, it starts the morning of the parade at 9 AM March 17th! Be Well! And..YES..tickets will go on- sale on-line February 1st... but if you can't wait and want to send a check in ahead of time.. feel free! Just don't forget to tell me what you'd like for lunch! Always, I Live to Laugh! Bonnie Barchichat Executive Producer Senior Comedy Afternoons.com 714-914.2565 P.S. Please share this email with friends who can use some more fun, laughter and sociability in their life and then please feel free to give me physical addresses to add on to our growing mailing list. Who doesn't like mail!? P.P.S. Sponsors.. If you're Senior Friendly and want to meet our Audience here's your opportunity! Drop me a line and say tell me more! www.Here's the Proud Bird! ©2020 Senior Comedy Afternoons LLC. | 2313 Nelson Avenue, Redondo Beach, Ca. 90278
  2. ActivityDirector.org has CE Courses Online. NCCAP PreApproved
  3. Giving Back: A Year of Charitable Activities Meaning and purpose in one’s life must be created and encouraged through selecting experiences and activities that feed the soul. To be in need is one of the most motivating factors in longevity and feeling joy. Being an Activity Director is in itself such a choice. We all seek to be of service. Perhaps the biggest barrier is not knowing where to start in this quest. This workshop is full of activity ideas to set you up for an entire year of charitable activities! Ongoing Activities are presented to guide you in creating activities that stretch out over the year, ensuring a more personal and lasting contribution to your community. Monthly Activities are provided to encourage fresh ways of giving back more frequently. I am certain you and your residents will make a real impact on the lives of those around you. Topics Covered: Health Benefits of Giving Ongoing Activities Monthly Activities Start Your Own Charity Ongoing Activity Example Pen Pals Program Summary: Create a Pen Pal Program where your residents can exchange letters, pictures, etc. with residents from another facility. Directions: Have all interested residents sign up so you have a head count. Create a form for each participant to sign stating they understand and agree to not use offensive language, inappropriate storytelling, and anything else you wish to use for your guidelines. Be sure and note in the form that you reserve the right to read any of their material for assurances if need be that way no one feels violated in the event you need to check. Once you have your list complete call some of your neighboring facilities and get your fellow Activity Director on board to do the same. You can then match residents at random and let the fun begin! Variation: Try creating the program with residents from a facility in a faraway state. This will allow for more interesting exchange of information. If your residents need help getting going you and your fellow Activity Director could come up with specific topics to cover for each given writing period. Topics can include childhood, first love, best friends, big adventures, parenthood, etc. Some of your residents may want to participate but are unable to physically write their letters. Ask some of your residents to volunteer their time and help them write their letters. Monthly Activity Example April National Pet Day - Few things break my heart quite like seeing an abandoned animal with no home to call their own. There is something about their innocence that makes any pain inflicted on them simply unbearable to me. You don’t have to be an animal lover to experience the desire to assist our fellow creatures. I am sure many of your resident’s feel that exact same way. There are some ways you can help that seem obvious, such as volunteering time at a shelter or donating animal food and toys or homemade dog biscuits to your local ASPCA, but there are also some ways you may not have thought about. I certainly didn’t until I was researching the topic for this course. These include: Recycle - Recycling your trash prevents it from filling a dump that then encroaches upon the natural habitat of countless animals. Don’t Litter - keeping your trash in cans and picking up other people’s litter prevent animals from ingesting any poison or choking hazards. It also prevents it from clogging up any waterways that are used like highways for creatures. Plant Native - Planting native plants all around your facility ensures that your local wildlife will thrive in their natural habitat. Not Tested on Animals - Make a policy to not purchase stuff for your department that has been tested on animals. Fresh Water - Make sure there are plenty of outside locations that provide fresh water for birds and such. Whichever avenue you choose to take be sure and create an educational activity around it where you can impart some wisdom about the animal/s you are trying to help. Knowledge is key and makes it harder to ignore those in need. This is true no matter the topic. Giving Back: A Year of Charitable Activities 5 CEs for $49.95 BUY NOW! BUY NOW! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
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    These are the Resident Rights as outlined by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid CMS.gov They pertain to Skilled Nursing Facilities , Long Term Care, Assisted Living, Adult Daycare etc. Print these out and make sure your residents know their rights.

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  5. 1Your Rights and Protections as a Nursing Home Resident View File These are the Resident Rights as outlined by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid CMS.gov They pertain to Skilled Nursing Facilities , Long Term Care, Assisted Living, Adult Daycare etc. Print these out and make sure your residents know their rights. Submitter actnet Submitted 12/07/2019 Category Activity Director Documentation & Regulation Forms  
  6. Activity Directors Network Online Classroom Visit ActivityDirector.org or call us at 1.888.238.0444 Our Online MEPAP Classes start Tuesday January 7th 2019 We are now enrolling! Activity Directors Network is the premiere online provider of the MEPAP classes with almost all of our students passing the NCCAP national exam. We have taught students from all 50 states, Canada and England. Activity Directors in Long Term Care, Nursing Homes, Assisted Living Facilities, Adult Daycare, Swing-Bed Hospital Care, Recreational Care and PACE programs can take the NCCAP MEPAP Courses. Our MEPAP 1 is the most widely accepted Activity Director Training course in the US. Make sure your Activity Staff is qualified before your next Survey, The Centers for Medicaid and Medicare (cms.gov) State Survey of Senior Care Facilities follow Federal Regulation F680-F679, Surveyors Guideline In most States this course meets all of the Minimum State Requirements under Federal regulation F680, Check with your State Regs and your facility for any additional Continuing Education requirements. ------------ Taking a course Online is a very interactive way to learn. Not only do you benefit from a professional Activity Director Instructor, You also share the knowledge and networking with your entire class. Our Classrooms Lead Instructor: Kathy Hughes ADC , has over 40 years of teaching the NCCAP Certification course experience, as one of the original MEPAP Certification Training Course Authors, Kathy has the "know how", the experience and the resources to train you and your staff to provide innovative activities to your residents as well as learn about the regulations that effect the delivery of activities. Our Guest Instructors - Swing-Bed Specialist, Ruth Martanis - Adult-Day Health Specialist, Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP Once you experience the Online Classroom setting you'll wonder why you didn't try this sooner. ----------- The 24/7 Chatroom and the Class Forum are just two of the ways each and every Student can reach out to the entire class to either ask for help, offer some advice or share their particular journey with the class. You will enjoy networking with activity professionals who share their ideas and knowledge throughout the course. Our online class lasts 4 months, a 180hr course, 90hrs Class Study/90hrs of Practicum (Fieldwork). ** Cost is $600 - Payment Plans are available. "If your facility is paying, simply sign our Purchase Order Agreement to verify payment, and start the class , we will wait on a Check . --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ask about our "Self-Paced Format" that will allow you to expedite the training or extend it out for a year to help accommodate a busy life..... !! To Get Started : visit ActivityDirector.org download the MEPAP 1 Enrollment Packet fill out the enrollment forms + purchase order if applicable. fax them in and you're ready to go. (fax 1+866-405-5724). Enrollment Packets >> click here>> 🔻MEPAP 1 🔻 MEPAP 2 ---------------------------------------- ** Click HERE to have the Enrollment Packet emailed to you. ---------------------------------------- Be sure and use our "Military Family Discount" $100 off any Military family EZ Payment Plans Available , use the Make a Payment option on https://activitydirector.org - Call or email us to set up a plan that will work for you! Email Us - admin@activitydirector.net Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of Our Network, Pennie The Behavioral Health Programming Guide is a "Must Have" for your facility. Not only does this comprehensive guide explain the new Behavioral Health Regs But it lays out a plan of action to keep your entire facility in Compliance. Learn to evaluate your residents for the most common BH issues Learn to classify and develop activities and careplans with measurable goals. Most of all make sure your facility is BH Ready for your next State Survey $14.95 - in the AD Store - Digital Download
  7. Generation Z is pulling a Z snap on Baby Boomers and in true Generation Z fashion, there’s a meme about it. ‘OK, Boomer’ is popping up everywhere on the Internet as a clap back to all the Boomers’ criticism of the younger generation. The Boomers have been vocal in dismissing Generation Z as a privileged, lazy population with their heads up in the clouds. Accusations of wide spread Peter Pan Syndrome have been popularly noted and expressed from the older generation. Their judgements have not fallen on deaf ears. The response from Generation Z is a message of anger and blame. Gen Z believes the Boomers are out of touch and to blame for the state of an alleged failing economy, environmental protections, political and human equanimity, and so forth. My Opinion I could never promote blame in any way. The only way to move forward is to focus forward. I believe there is many merits to both sides and collaboration would benefit us all. The experience and wisdom of the Boomer generation is something that cannot be devalued. Wisdom must never be ignored for evolution’s sake. The enthusiastic creativity generated by youthful dreaming is of equal value. Two parts that make a beautiful whole. Mother Theresa famously stated that she would never attend an anti-war rally. However, if invited to a peace rally she would attend without hesitations. I believe the path forward is to focus on the solution, as well. For Activity Directors, Inter-generational planning is one of the most important programs we can maintain to keep our residents healthy and full of life. How do we prevent generational divides from affecting our ability to bring people together? Truthfully, we almost have an obligation to at least try. Our place in the facility and the community positions us in one of the prime spots to have a real impact on healing the divide. Ways Forward Focus on Commonality The best place to start in any divide is to first focus on what is in common between the sides. This brings neutrality and a willingness to find friendship, for your purpose of building connections. Gen Z believes Boomers are unwilling to make changes and are stuck in their ways, so to speak. However, Boomers were responsible for the massive social changes that took place in the 60’s and 70’s. One could draw a straight line of positive change from the plight of their cause to the causes taking center stage now. It is all a dream of freedom in one form or another. Humans in general have that in common and it is a good place to start in your planning. What can you plan that would focus on this commonality? Is there a holiday you could utilize to educate on this common thread? Trade Wisdom Create an environment where wisdom is traded and therefore valued. Your facility is stocked with almost all generations. Host workshops where different talents are shared. Younger individuals can teach a short lesson on using technology. Your residents can teach on history, taxes, carving, stamp collecting, etc. Most talents are dictated by the era in which one is raised. Utilize this to bring people together. What’s old is new. Get Real We all have stereo types. We all have judgments. This is a built in system meant to keep us safe and sometimes it goes overboard. This is a fact we shouldn’t work against. The important thing is to end all discussions of conflict with a solution put forward. Have group discussions with your residents about their grievances. Listen to their frustrations about the world as it is now. Of course, it is frustrating to watch the younger generation disappear into a sea of screens. It is equally frustrating to look back and see no action being taken to prevent some of the biggest problems we all now must shoulder. Discuss these things. Read newspaper articles. Talk about this meme. Get real about what is happening. Then talk about solutions and highlight the positive. Talk about what ties us all together. BUY Now! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. http://ActivityDirector.org 1.888.238.0444 Our mailing address is: 2010 Hwy 190 W #120 Livingston Texas 77351
  8. Make a Difference Day October 26, 2019 by M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP This day is an unofficial secular holiday or observance focused on community service and volunteer efforts. Traditionally celebrated on the fourth Saturday in October since 1992. All across the United States volunteers perform projects for their community, for individuals in need and a number of charitable organizations. This October 26th millions of volunteers will come together to honor “Make a Difference Day.” This day is observed as one of the largest and most widely recognized days for community service efforts. Volunteers actively engage in environmental tasks, charity fund raising such as bake sales local food banks, donate their time to nursing homes and women’s safe haven centers, and a host of many other activities. Not only to celebrate but to create awareness that people can truly make a difference when joining forces with actions to improve the quality of life for so many individuals. One of the most rewarding things about “Make a Difference Day” is that it matters not the volunteer age or background, we can all help others. We can give back to the communities and profoundly change the world. Senior Volunteer Programs do Making a Difference Older adults participating in volunteer programs will find it extremely rewarding on a number of levels. While there are a variety of groups and places the older adult can choose to support, the choice is often based more so on becoming involved in something that allows the volunteer to feel useful once again. The rewards gained from acceptance while volunteering to help others is immeasurable and as a whole, the wise elder appreciates and benefits tremendously from the experience. Whether it’s within their own nursing home, community center, adult day health center, or assisted living facility there are so many avenues and opportunities for older adults to really “make a difference” through volunteer services. Note: Adults over the age of 55 comprised nearly 36% of the 62.6 million volunteers, with 10% of the volunteers being 75 years old or older. https://www.leisurecare.com/resources/benefits-of-volunteering-seniors/ Volunteering Benefits Volunteering has important emotional and physical health benefits for the volunteer – especially when that volunteer happens to be an older adult. Depending on availability of time and the level of energy your resident possesses, you will find plenty of ways for seniors to experience the benefits from volunteering opportunities. Here’s a list of just a few possibilities and their respective benefits: Children - Teach them well. We all know that seniors are great stories tellers. Pair your residents up with youngsters by holding an Intergenerational Program. Seniors can volunteer during story hour and tell the little ones about history because they’ve lived through it firsthand. Who does not love to hear wonderful accounts of days of the past filled with curiosity and adventure? Additionally, children whom otherwise may not have previous experience with elders will learn to accept those imperfections that come with aging and come to respect and value the elder’s wisdom. Pay It Forward – The resident as a student then becomes the teacher. Plan to kick leisure pursuits up a notch by creating a “resident to resident volunteer program.” This would be one to one or small groups. Encourage those elders that have learned new found skills in technology, crafting, cooking, etc. to share what they have learned with their fellow residents. It is an opportunity for your resident to pay it forward. This is a dual benefiting experience both for the resident sharing knowledge and the resident learning something new. The added bonus it that it makes way for wonderful resident friendships. Supporting the Community - Volunteering for organizations and services gets seniors out into the community and is a great way to instill a sense of purpose and responsibility while also encouraging social engagement and friendships. A recent study of adults over the age of 60 who volunteer reported higher levels of well-being and lower disability than those who did not volunteer. Note: Current regulations specify that community involvement opportunities must be in place within senior care facilities. Where Seniors can Volunteer If you want to volunteer with seniors you can contact a number of services and programs within your local area. If you’re not sure where to go there are many organizations that can help you find a place where your older adults’ services are needed. Here’s a look at some to contact: Elder Helpers National Council on Aging AARP Volunteer Match Volunteers of America Meals on Wheels One Foster Grandparent's Rebound Anna Nelson, 70, a Foster Grandparent volunteer with five- and six-year-olds in Knoxville, Tenn., for the past three years, can attest to the study’s results. “I’m not depressed anymore. My blood pressure has come down. My blood work is now normal. My cholesterol level is down,” said Nelson, one of 500 Senior Corps volunteers in Knoxville. In addition, Nelson said, “I’ve lost weight from being more active with the kids. They get me moving.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2019/03/12/the-volunteering-that-makes-people-55-healthier/#7672e1cde5e8 Note: According to the Corporation for National Community & Service, the most common forms of volunteering are: Collecting, serving, preparing, or distributing food Fundraising or selling items to raise money Engaging in general labor, like helping build homes or clean up parks Tutoring or teaching Mentoring the youth Collecting, making, or distributing clothing No matter if it’s walking dogs at the local Humane Society, building a home for Habitat for Humanity or restocking books at the local library, volunteering keeps seniors physically active. Maintaining physical fitness and an active lifestyle can prevent a number of injuries and prevent or delay the onset of some diseases. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org BUY Now Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  9. What’s The Difference Between Adult Day Centers? Alzheimer’s and dementia care facilities Socialization and safety centers Medical, therapy and socialization centers Adult Day Centers are either social or medical in nature with a specifically trained and compassionate staff that creates programs to meet the needs, preferences and cultural differences of those they serve. These facilities offer supportive assistance by way of physical activities and cognitive stimulation and/ or medical care during the day-time hours (no overnight stays). Family members can plan for daily “predictable respite” for which they might use to relax or go to work or run necessary errands (without the added burden of taking their senior loved ones with them). When participants go home to be with their families after a day at the center, families will find their loved ones happy, stimulated, alert and often more ready to sleep soundly through the night. This provides the entire family with a most welcomed nighttime benefit which is often desperately needed. Without a doubt adult day health programming leads to improved well-being and increased socialization within a safe, nurturing and comfortable community setting. Medical vs. Social - There are two types of adult day care: Both provide a comfortable, secure place for a senior to reside during the day, enabling them to socialize, stay active, remain productive and enjoy an improved quality of life. Typically, the center provides one or two meals a day. Some centers provide transportation for pick up and/or drop off, which may or may not be included in the cost. The main difference between medical and social day care is that the medical model also provides an array of medical professionals, which may include on-site registered nurses, speech therapists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, social workers and registered dietitians. NOTE: The easiest way to identify the difference between these two centers is to take a look at the name. An “adult day care” facility, without the word “health” in the title is not required to adhere to the same standards and regulations and do not offer the availability of on-site health care professionals from a range of disciplines to provide clinical oversight. Adult Day Centers and Offerings Socialization and safety centers – Adult Day Care Adult Day Care centers generally have well-trained activity specialists who lead dynamic activities programs. These programs might include arts and crafts, intergenerational programs, music, cooking classes, exercise sessions, movies, discussion groups, live entertainment and trips into the community. Some care centers offer programs that are especially designed for physically frail individuals with special medical needs such as diabetes, hypertension and post-stroke disabilities, and those with mental health challenges such as dementia, confusion and Alzheimer's disease. The goal is to be an extension of the home environment with caring, personalized service. These centers rely on private pay reimbursement for services provided. Medical, therapy and socialization centers – Adult Day Health Adult Day Health centers offer all of the same services you would find in Adult Day Care centers mentioned above, in addition; they provide ” certified” amenities via trained health care professionals such as physical, occupational and speech therapies, nursing services, personal care, social services and much more depending on the individuals acuity level assessment. These centers are prepared and well equipped to enroll not only very independent individuals but also those with chronic physical illness and/or cognitively challenging needs. Most states have specific governing bodies that work to establish procedures for licensing and regulation standards to oversee the business of Adult Day Health “medical” care centers. These regulations are mandated and centers are required to adhere to guidelines and protocols to be given licensing privileges. These standards are not only specific to medical record guidelines but are also required for the centers to qualify to submit billing to Medicaid and/or Medicare for reimbursement of services on behalf of those participants pre-approved to receive these benefits. Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care centers – may be found in either social or medical model centers (medical facilities usually provide for more advanced stages of the disease). Alzheimer's and Dementia Care centers provide care for patients that are at a heightened risk for safety and cannot be left unsupervised. Progressive memory and cognitive decline may lead to potential for wandering and risk for self harm from misuse of everyday regular household items. This puts family caregivers in a difficult position, especially if outside help is scarce and/or family members are still working. Dementia programs at adult day centers typically utilize security features to prevent wandering as well as improved staffing ratios to ensure seniors are safe and their needs are met in a timely manner. This provides invaluable free time and peace of mind for the dementia caregivers. Skilled Adult day centers that specialize in the care of those with dementia are becoming more and more in demand in light of the increased numbers of seniors diagnosed with this disease over the past few years. Many states require centers to have staff members obtain specific dementia training to care for this population. Trained professionals are able to recognize those seniors that prefer quiet, solitude like environment while others are in desperate need of more stimulation. This expertise proactively minimizes potential disruptive behavior by addressing each individual’s unique needs. State regulations have been written to target this topic requiring medication management to modify behavior to be used only as the last option after it is documented that all non-pharmaceutical interventions have been implemented without success through the individualized care plan. In Conclusion... Adult Day centers provide an array of activities for attendees to participate in; adapted to each person’s unique abilities to maximize enjoyment and minimize frustration. Many centers also offer flexible scheduling choices from attending just a few hours each day to attending the entire day for one or more days per week. The affordable cost of care for Adult Day allows these centers to be more accessible to a wide range of families for senior care options. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Introducing a NEW course from Best-Selling Teacher Kathy Hughes, ADC... ENROLL Now Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  10. Our amazing consultant, M. Celeste Chase, has earned her CMDCP and we are most excited to congratulate her accomplishment! Celeste works extremely hard to ensure that she is delivering the absolute best advice and education in every single one of her weekly columns. Her contributions are greatly helping Activity Professionals everywhere to improve the lives of the residents they serve while maintaining confidence in their skill set. We are very proud and grateful for you Celeste. Celeste was kind enough to provide information below regarding the certification mission and process in case any of you are interested in obtaining it for yourself. We support you! Certified Montessori Dementia Care Professional (CMDCP) About my New Certification The Montessori Method can help build self-worth in dementia residents—and help them connect with the outside world despite their dementia. With its focus on respect for the resident, a safe and nurturing environment, and activities that promote engagement on a level that’s possible. Montessori Method for Dementia Residents Maria Montessori was one of Italy’s first female physicians. In 1907, she developed a new type of school—designed for challenging students who were once considered “un-teachable.” Her work gradually allowed her to recognize that her methods were equally successful for adults with dementia. Under the Montessori philosophy, nothing the resident says or does is “wrong.” The work incorporates creative involvement within the resident’s version of the world, rather than to attempt to correct memory or perceptions. Promote Value Focus remained on the value of the resident and the importance of promoting that he/she still has intrinsic value—and to introduce activities that foster that feeling. For example: Higher-functioning dementia residents may be asked to teach others with lower functions on how to do certain tasks—promoting the idea that they still have useful skills to teach others. Montessori principles and interventions are effective with people who have a memory deficit but could still engage in procedural learning. Activities with patients with dementia are structured to progress from the simple to the complex and are intended to be interactive for short bursts of time. Engagement by stimulating the mind with activities that use fine motor skills. Use of shapes, cards, chips, and objects that enhance dexterity. Engaging Senses Montessori activities are specifically designed to appeal to all five senses, helping dementia residents connect to the world around them in a safe and nurturing environment. The program often uses art and music therapy, mild physical exercise, and group activities that focus on the individual's abilities. These activities are designed to evoke positive emotions—and help them reconnect with the world around them. Connection with Long-Term Memory While more recent memories are often destroyed by dementia, many residents retain their long-term memory. Montessori method creates opportunities for dementia patients to reconnect to positive long-term memories, a tactic that can help draw dementia resident out of states of withdrawal, isolation, or paranoia. Maintaining Respect This means respecting and honoring their current perceptions and memories—even if those are “wrong” by objective standards. It also includes trying to meet the resident where they are, offering activities that start with their capabilities and gently push the envelope to help them build new skills, and honoring the abilities and achievements the resident is still capable of doing. The Montessori Method places an emphasis on independence, freedom within limits, and respect for a person’s natural psychological, physical, and social development. I am honored to have recently achieved this designation. Approval Process Your experience and credentials are submitted for approval to the International Council of Certified Dementia Practitioners (ICCDP). Once approved, you are required to take a 6 hour course through the Center for Applied Research in Dementia and pass an exam. FYI- There is a cost and requirements for renewal. More INFO Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  11. Creating In-Services for your Activity Department and the Facility by M. Celeste Chase AC-BC, ACC, CDP ActivityDirector.org Learning opportunities through in-services not only sends an intrinsic message that staff is highly valued but will also boost employment retention and job satisfaction. Appropriately supported, in-services have an added benefit of preventing job burnout for those in the demanding healthcare industry and that is a win-win for everyone! Interpretive Guidelines Tag 679 – Identifies that “all staff” is accountable for assuring that meaningful activities are provided to ALL RESIDENTS regardless of resident limitations or lack of response. To this end, all staff members must fully understand not only the therapeutic value of engagement as it relates to quality of life, but must possess appropriate skills, techniques and strategies to deliver meaningful activities. The Activity Director is the key individual to take the lead in this training through facility in-services. A great place to find topics (“good bones”) for in-services can easily be found within the Interpretive Guidelines. Let’s take a look at three up and coming guidelines from: [Phase 3] - OBRA 87’ Interpretive Guidelines effective on: November 28, 2019 F940 §483.95 Training Requirements Facilities must develop, implement and maintain an effective training program that is based on the Facility Assessment. Training must be completed for new staff, existing staff, contracted individuals and volunteers (consistent with their roles). The amount and type of training required should be reflective of the services and patient acuity identified in the Facility Assessment. This guideline states that training topics must include, but are not limited to: Communication Resident’s Rights QAPI - Quality Assurance & Performance Improvement Infection Control Compliance and Ethics Behavioral Health F941 Communication Training Facilities must have mandatory training for direct care staff on effective communications. The importance of communication is emphasized, including communication across all shifts and information sharing between staff, residents and representatives. Direct care staff needs to understand their responsibilities for reporting change in condition and sharing information between team members for continuity in care provided that is based on individualized interventions. F942 Resident’s Rights Training Facilities must ensure that all staff members – not just direct care staff – receive appropriate education on resident’s rights and be knowledgeable in the facility’s responsibilities in providing care for its residents. Under F550 Resident’s Rights, residents have the right to be treated with dignity and respect, and all interventions with residents by staff must assist the residents in maintaining/enhancing their self-esteem and self-worth, show respect for each resident’s individuality and incorporate the resident’ goals, choices and preferences. NOTE: This training requirement is likely to already exist in most facilities, but facilities that do not have this topic included in its staff education requirements will need to do so by the [Phase 3] deadline mentioned above. You can easily see that OBRA 87’ Interpretive Guidelines makes training expectations abundantly clear and sets the bar for specific materials for learning opportunities. This will provide you with a strong arsenal of tools from which you can reference for new in-services to ensure that your facility complies with recommended standards. Be sure to compare these topics with your new staff member’s orientation training topics as well as your annual mandatory re-education plan. For a successful in-service experience, develop a strategy that supports team synergy and mutual respect to get other staff members excited and willing to be committed to your program. In-Service/ Foundation Plan: Listed below are the preliminary steps to develop your in-service program. Each component is a building block to the next and will get you well on your way to creating a strong and successful in-service that will enlighten your fellow staff associates in a way in which they will better understand and respect the complex nature of the work you do as a professional Activity Director. Component # 1 –Training Order The order of presenting in-service training sessions can start with the most urgent to least urgent or oldest information to newest information, or build upon the initial session to the next. The ladder works well if the attendees need to understand certain things before assimilating more advanced materials. Component # 2 - Ask How Your Attendees Learn Best Another effective time saving strategy is to incorporate learning styles that are well suited to in-service attendees. As you most likely know, many of us attain information better when given specific ways to learn. Some people learn the quickest through reading, while others prefer visuals and hands-on experience. Understanding the learning styles of your audience will make your time more effective and productive thus, getting the most value for the time spent. Component # 3 - Materials Distribution Before the In-Service Consider distributing informative materials such as manuals, or short “cheat sheets” or step-by-step introductions relating to the topic scheduled for the in-service before training session begins. This is a great way to build up in-service anticipation and interest. Distribution prior to the in-service will also decrease the customary introduction time at the beginning of the in-service and help you jump right into the material to be presented. Component # 4 - Create a Training Schedule When in-service trainings are conducted during “on-duty” hours it is wise to set a predictable schedule. This allows attendees to plan for floor coverage and seek necessary supervisory approval in advanced. Be cognizant and adaptable to staff availability to ensure optimum participation. Mindful scheduling during on-duty hours to reduce staff “off the floor time” will also be looked upon favorably by your administration. HINT: In-services held after regular work hours should also be respectfully scheduled so that it doesn't infringe upon the staff’s anticipated leisure time. Once again your consideration and sensitivity in this area will more likely create eager participation. Component # 5 – Incorporate Session Breaks It’s a given that long in-service training may not be permissible particularly when staff’s “off the floor” coverage proves to be challenging. That said, take a moment to break away even for s short bathroom visit. It may be all you need to keep your attendees focused and refreshed thus, moving the in-service in a positive direction throughout the session. Component # 6 – Serve Light Refreshments As a very common and familiar adage goes, If you feed them - they will come! Providing food at a business event can promote attendance and provide a welcoming atmosphere which in turn, will get your in-service off to a great start. Keep it simple – consider dietary restrictions. What you serve will depend on the time of day that you schedule your in-service. Morning events tend to focus on coffee, tea, fruits, pastries, etc. Afternoon events are more likely to be about soda, cookies, pretzels, etc. Bottled water is always appropriate no matter what time of the in-service and decaffeinated options should always be offered. Creating and organizing interdisciplinary facility in-services for staff will set you apart from the rest and help you develop a reputation as a knowledgeable and credible professional in your field. Fellow staff members and associates will quickly recognize the complexity of your position and will readily get on board to ensure that every staff member provides “quality of life” opportunities for all the residents within your facility. “Opportunities for learning - present an extraordinary prospect to expand our knowledge base and growth both in personal confidence and competency skills that ultimately will benefit the residents we serve.” Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to CelesteChase @ activitydirector.org ENROLL Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  12. We have several new CE Courses up on the website http://activitydirector.org You can take any of the courses & finish them in one sitting or work on them a little at a time. Once you have completed the course(s) you will be able to download the certificate yourself & print it out.
  13. Perfect Summer Fruit Salad From allrecipes.com By Nicole Graham Holley I made this recipe over July 4th. It was cold, refreshing & the sauce is wonderful. You could easily take this recipe & make an activity out of it. Have residents help with cutting the fruit & placing it in the bowl. The AD can do the cooking. Make this in the am. Place in refrigerator & then in the afternoon gather residents up to eat. This should be in the refrigerator for at least 3 hours. Ingredients: 2/3 C fresh orange juice 1/3 C fresh lemon juice 1/3 C packed brown sugar ½ tsp grated orange zest ½ tsp grated lemon zest 1 tsp vanilla extract 2 C cubed fresh pineapple 2 C strawberries, hulled & sliced 3 kiwi fruit, peeled & sliced 3 bananas, sliced 2 oranges, peeled & sectioned 1 C seedless grapes 2 C blueberries Directions: Bring orange juice, lemon juice, brown sugar, orange & lemon zest to a boil in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low, simmer until slightly thicken about 5 mins. Remove from heat stir in vanilla extract. Set aside to cool In a clear glass bowl, just for looks, place all the fruit into the bowl. Pour the sauce over all the fruit. Then gently mix all the fruit & sauce together. Cover & place in refrigerator for 3 to 4 hours. You can use any fruit, peaches, melon etc.
  14. The Villas at Stanford Ranch, Rocklin's luxurious assisted living community for seniors, is seeking an Activities Director to add to the team! Our assisted living community houses all three tiers - Memory Care, Assisted Living, and Independent Living. We are seeking an activities Director for our Independent and Assisted Living sector.. Are you an upbeat, happy-go-lucky, event planning, organized, outside the box thinker? If you answered yes, and meet the requirements below, apply today! Responsibilities include: Ensure our residents recognize personal satisfaction and enrichment through designing and implementing innovative and creative activities, programs, outings and other events. Develop newsletter content, flyers, activity calendars, one-pagers, and other collateral material that support resident/family/staff awareness and engagement. Collaborate with other Department Heads to ensure full visibility of programming. Develop, proactively plan and implement creative activities, outings and programs that enrich our resident's lives. Control costs, manage the activities budget, manage and inspire the activities team Promote participation in activities and help foster social connectedness between residents. Gather feedback from residents concerning activities and adjust programs to best meet the resident's needs. Involve family members and guests in activities/programs whenever possible. Coordinate resident transportation for needs including, but not limited to, activities, shopping, and doctor trips Establish and coordinate the Community Resident Council and attend all meetings Listen and respond to all resident problems, complaints, suggestions, and ideas regarding activities Coordinate use of all volunteers Document history of community with photographs and scrapbooks Works under general supervision but functions well with autonomy. MUST be a team player! Skills required: Excellent communication skills: You will be working with a variety of people and departments, so it's critical that you enjoy interacting with others on a daily basis and are comfortable speaking in front of small groups. Incredible attention to detail: It's the little things that count! Self-directed: Must be able to take a project, run with it, and (ideally) exceed expectations by anticipating needs. Creativity: We are a luxurious community and hold ourselves to a high standard. Creativity in developing outside the box activities that differentiate us from the competition is crucial. Organization: Amongst the chaos of the day to day responsibilities and activities, maintaining organization is a must. If you are looking for a rewarding position and a great company culture, we urge you to apply! The Villas At Stanford Ranch is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer. Full-time Staffing staffing@thevillasatstanfordranch.com 1430 W. Stanford Ranch Rd. Rocklin, CA 95765 Phone: (916)741-7050 Fax: (916)259-2698
  15. actnet

    Hello

    Good Morning, It's been a long time, but always like to have popcorn, and even the puffed popcorn for those that can't have regular popcorn, Oriental trading is a great company to get a lot of your decorations, and I would check to see if the boy and girl scouts could do something for you and also check with the local drama clubs, you might want to check with an animal rescue or something like that. I wish you the best, and as always here to help in any way. Mary Zonneville Sodus
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