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  1. Do You Need APNCC.org PreApproved CEU's for Your National Certification Requirements View this email in your browser A fun night out to the movies no longer needs to include the 'out' part. Watching movies from the comfort of where you live has never been easier and it is an activity your residents will love. We don't want to just turn a movie on and walk off, though. Let's make it an event! A bunch of them in fact. I am talking about a Movie Month! Plan one movie night per week and go all out for it. Hand out tickets, serve popcorn, soda, candy, etc. Decorate the movie area so it feels like like leaving home. You can add curtains to each side of the TV, setup a ticket taking area, and hang movie posters. Get people hyped up for movie night all week by keeping the movie a secret. Each day make an announcement with one piece of trivia from the movie and let them all guess throughout the week, with the answer being revealed on the screen. Keep residents involved in the movie selection by having them all submit their choice and you can select 4 common ones from there. To maintain interest you could also serve a different treat each movie night. For example, coke floats, banana splits, ice cream cones, and sundaes. Below are some ideas to get your planning going! I found this free resource from familystrong.blogspot.com and created a printable page with a variety of tickets for you to print out and use. For best results print on card stock. Movie Ticket Printable Reveal Answers "The secret to 'stay crispy' popcorn is Clarified Butter." Once you have your clarified butter ready, make your popcorn using it and as a topping. The optional coloring mentioned is a mixture of turmeric and saffron. Click on either picture to view the full recipe. Get Full Recipe HERE Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351 Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
  2. Why not create a COMEDY CLUB setting for your Seniors.. ? Put out cafe tables, cocktails with tiny umbrellas.. and screen the "Best of Senior Comedy Afternoons" DVD. The DVD takes just 65 minutes of time and will have them laughing in no time.. Maybe you'll want to have them submit their best jokes on paper and either have them deliver them, or read them prior to seeing the show... Everyone wants to be a stand-up right? Well, here's their chance... before they see the professionals on the screen! Or another idea is to pop it in the TV screens on your own channel and have them listen to it in their own rooms.. AS LONG AS THEY LAUGH! THATS THE GOAL!! LAUGHTER!! ..
  3. Celebrate Great Outdoor Month and National Trails Day on June 5th (the first Saturday in June)! Gather your residents that are able and willing and get them involved in a light hike. There are trails absolutely everywhere that you may not even know about! Check out the app All Trails and put in your zip code for a complete list of all hikes near you, including their length and level of intensity. Pick a light trail to make sure your residents are all able to complete it without issue. www.AllTrails.com Useful hiking tips for active seniors By Stef Zisovska Source: www.OutdoorRevival.com Hiking is the best outdoor activity for people from any generation. There are many out there that don’t like to accept it, but the fact is hiking rules. Also, there are many health benefits to be had if you practice it once a week. There is no need to mention that spending time in the wilderness and walking alongside fields, streams, and rivers is especially useful for active seniors who like to stay fit and keep themselves in a good and healthy condition. Why take dozens of pills and feel sick much of the time when you can resolve many physical issues for free while enjoying nature at the same time. Here are some useful hiking tips for elderly people who refuse to give up! Hike safely Before heading to your first hiking trail, consult your doctor about it and check for any ailments that might need to be addressed. As an active senior, it’s always better to go hiking early in the morning or in the afternoon when the temperatures are not too high and won’t affect your blood pressure. If you want to go alone, don’t forget to let your family or your neighbor know where it is that you’re going and when you expect to be back. Take plenty of water (at least 2 liters), protein bars, nuts, a safety whistle in case you get lost, a rain jacket (bright colors preferred), a cell phone (if you’re planning to hike near the city), first-aid kit, and an extra pair of socks. Dress appropriately Don’t try to be fancy or wear jeans on the trail. Hiking is an outdoor activity that requires a lot of effort and sweating, so go for working out clothes if possible. Dress in layers that can be stripped off. As for your feet, always wear sturdy tennis shoes if the terrain is not too demanding. Otherwise, good old hiking boots are what you need to have at home just in case you decide to climb a difficult route. Stretch before you start walking Always do some basic warm-up stretching exercises that will help your muscles prepare for the challenge. There are trails that may seem to be easy for you and you think no warm-up is needed, but that’s not the reality. No matter how old you are, you need to stretch all your muscles before starting any ascent, even the lowest hill in the world. Hike at your own pace Hiking is not racing, and there is absolutely no need for you to compete with anyone else from your group. The point of it is not who will finish the loop first, but who will enjoy it the most. So, don’t push yourself to do something that your body doesn’t like, but hike at your own pace. If you run into obstacles that you don’t feel ready for, just slow down, think twice, and if necessary go back and ask for help. Why force your body to do something that doesn’t suit it? Start with short hikes If you are a senior and you’ve never hiked before, no problem, as it’s never too late. What you need to be aware of is your watch. When starting out, try doing 30-minute to 1-hour hikes and see how you feel afterward. Do this twice a week and if you feel you’re gaining more strength, start adding 15 more minutes to each hike. Try hiking poles or a walking stick If you have problems with your balance, there is no reason for you to not be spending time in nature. Be brave, get hiking poles and go out there to conquer the beautiful landscapes that surround you. Hold your stick or poles so that your elbows are at a comfortable 90-degree angle. Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Celebrate National Doughnut Day (always first Friday in June)! To celebrate this fine day you could just make a doughnut spread on a food cart with some hot coffee. Or...if you work at facility where spirits are welcome, check out these unique doughnut and wine pairings for a fun twist on this beloved breakfast staple. Dunk Into National Doughnut Day With These Doughnut And Wine Pairings by:Jeff Licciardello Source: www.vinepair.com National Doughnut Day is finally upon us and you bet your bottom dollar we’re going to be celebrating at the VinePair office. While it is generally expected that you should pair a good cup of coffee with a doughnut, expectations are for people who don’t like Thai food and think that Times New Roman is the ONLY font acceptable for use. TAKE IT FROM US, ? BE LIKE THEM. Throw the expectations out the freaking window (literally throw your cup of coffee out the damn window) and get your corkscrew instead. We’ve matched classic doughnuts with their perfect vino. And before your boss even asks, yes, it’s acceptable to drink wine in the morning if there’s a doughnut attached to it. Obvi. Original Plain- Chardonay Old faithful doughnut, meet old faithful wine. The old fashioned doughnut is light and fluffy, but still rich and decadent. A lightly oaked or even an unoaked Chardonnay has extremely similar qualities but it’s the tropical notes that are going to take the plain doughnut to the next level. Glazed – Brut Champagne The one. The only. The classically glazed doughnut is a go-to for the morning masses. Because it’s very sweet, we’ve opted for a Brut Champagne that will still carry a touch of sugar, but won’t overpower the doughnut. Chocolate Frosted – Merlot What makes this doughnut so special is the fact that it’s a lighter base doughnut with an supremely divine chocolate topping. Take advantage of the sweet-cocoa flavors with a Merlot. It’s easy to drink (just like these damn doughnuts are easy to eat) and has enough spicy berry notes to tango with the chocolate. Strawberry Frosted – Rosé In my humble opinion, the strawberry frosted doughnut is the greatest doughnut to ever exist. Not only is it ICONIC, it’s sweet, fruity, and comes with sprinkles. WHO doesn’t like sprinkles? When you think pink with your doughnuts you need to think pink with the wine. A Rosé (Grenache is probably your best bet) is dry enough to not compete with the sugary frosting while delivering the floral notes this doughnut needs. It’s also Instagram ready, so what else could you ask for? Vanilla Frosted – Dry Riesling The vanilla frosted is the old-fashioned doughnut taken to the -nth degree of sweetness. Your ideal wine pairing here is something that has flavors to harmoniously blend with the vanilla but can still stand up to the excess sugar. A dry Riesling is just what the doughnut doctor ordered. Jelly – Malbec Depending on the doughnut shop you go to, the jelly-filled doughnut can be sweet, savory, or even somewhere in-between. Generally, you can expect a jelly doughnut to consist of red berry filling, thus we recommend a Malbec. Malbec has a lot of the darker berry flavors that can transform your plain raspberry filled doughnut into a mixed-berry masterpiece. Sour Cream – Prosecco An extremely underappreciated doughnut, the sour cream doughnut is irresistibly intoxicating. It’s on the heavier side so it needs a moderate amount of bubbles to cut through the fat. We recommend a Prosecco here because it has just enough sweetness to blend with the doughnut. Chocolate Cake – Cabernet Sauvignon A doughnut as deep and dark as the chocolate cake doughnut needs a wine that can stand by its side. Cabernet Sauvignon is this dougnut’s full-bodied match made in heaven because its dark fruity flavors can handle the death-by-chocolate-drama that the chocolate cake doughnut brings to the table. Blueberry – Pinot Grigio Another doughnut that isn’t as appreciated, the blueberry doughnut is actually set up to perfectly pair with a Pinot Grigio. The abundant lemon notes of the Pinot Grigio are the best complement to the heavy blueberry flavors from the blueberry doughnut. Apple Fritter/Cider Doughnut – Chenin Blanc Putting the debate of what actually makes a doughnut aside, the apple fritter is a favorite to many. Who can blame them, it’s sweet, slightly tart, and even has a subtle cinnamon spice. It’s basically fall in a doughnut and there’s only one wine we’re thinking of that would complement this perfectly – Chenin Blanc. A Chenin Blanc is the long lost twin of the apple fritter with its tropical flavors, splash of apple notes, and tang. Boston Cream – Extra-Brut Champagne Last but certainly not least, the Boston cream doughnut is as full-flavored as they come. This handheld version of the Boston cream pie is so heavenly rich, it needs a dry wine full of bubbles to slice right through the pastry cream. Thankfully, an Extra-Brut Champagne is up for the job. Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Celebrate Best Friends Day on June 8th! In honor of this Best Friends Day, we have created a Memory Dive worksheet that focuses on 'My Childhood Best Friend'. Click the link to grab your FREE copy! Free Memory Dive Worksheet Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Dad's lessons will always be better, though. Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  4. Celebrate Mother's Day on May 9th! Mother's Day is coming up quick! Pass this fun Mother's Day Quiz out to your residents to test their Mother's Day knowledge. Answer sheet included. Click Below for a FREE Mother's Day Pop Quiz! Free Mother's Day Pop Quiz Printable Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Celebrate Internat'l Hummus Day on May 13th! Crostini with Balsamic Strawberries and Ricotta Makes 12 appetizers by SheKeepsaLovelyHome.com Ingredients ½ cup strawberries, chopped ¼ cup balsamic vinegar 1 tsp. lemon zest 2 tsp. brown sugar 5 tbsp. ricotta ½ baguette Steps 1. Slice the baguette into 12 ½ inch slices. Toast them at 350 F. for 5 minutes or until nicely toasted. 2. While your tiny toasts are toasting... Click Below for Full Recipe! Get Recipe Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  5. Not only is it the month of LOVE, but it is also Heart Health Month! Today we will focus on some of the ways you can promote heart health in your facility. Below is a great article from Total Wellness Health that incorporates some action steps that you can take within your facility to celebrate. Who knows, one of these action steps just might save someone's life. 5 Ways to Celebrate American Heart Month By Seraine Page Source: TotalWellnessHealth.Com February is American Heart Month, which presents a great opportunity to spread awareness about heart disease throughout the workplace. Every year, heart disease kills 1 in 4 people. Heart disease is also known as coronary heart disease or coronary artery disease. Over time, “plaque” builds up in the arteries that take blood to the heart. What causes plaque? ● Smoking ● High blood pressure ● Too much fat and cholesterol in the blood ● Too much sugar in the blood The great news is this chronic, deadly disease can be avoided when people make healthy lifestyle choices while managing other health conditions. By spreading awareness like heart health facts and the major signs of a heart attack, employers give workers potentially life-saving tools. Hearts will be everywhere in February. Take advantage of all the love talk to circle around to matters of the heart, including a healthy heart. Ready to show some heart love? Here’s 5 ideas to celebrate American Heart Month: 1. Host a Quit Smoking Day Give away gift cards to employees who quit smoking on a designated day in February. It may only be one day, but if an employee is willing to try it, they may continue the trend. Quitting smoking improves breathing, blood pressure, and oxygen levels — all necessities for a healthy heart. Action step: Have employees planning to quit write their names on a bulletin board for the quit smoking day. It will bring staffers together who have a common goal in mind, and it allows accountability partnerships to develop. Encourage non-smokers to write encouraging notes on the board, too. 2. Give Your Heart Away Give away items that are cute and heart-related. A heart-shaped pen or a heart stress ball with a note of attached heart health facts are fun ways to spread awareness. Action step: Send out Valentine’s cards with heart healthy facts to every employee. It’s an affordable and memorable way to share heart disease information. 3. Sweat it Out As an entire staff, dedicate one day a week to workout together for all of February. It’s a short month anyways, so even gym haters can try out working out short-term in the name of a healthier ticker. The habit may even turn into an activity they enjoy instead of loathe. Action step: Ask an employee to coordinate each week’s physical fitness activities. It doesn’t have to be expensive. Head to the local park for a walk, or set up a Stairmaster challenge within your company’s stairwell. 4. Wear Red Raise awareness about heart disease by wearing the color red. Every Friday, have your entire staff wear various shades of red. Action step: To get into the team spirit, have shirts created with facts about heart disease on the back of the T-shirt. If you host a fundraiser to donate proceeds to a foundation like the American Heart Association, wear your shirts during the event to spread additional awareness. 5. Spread the Word The more you share, the more people will learn about heart disease and its lasting impacts on health. Knowledge is power, and the more your employees know, the better off they'll be. Action step: There are plenty of ways to get the word out. Share heart health facts in your monthly newsletter. Use #HeartMonth to tweet about American Heart Month on your company account. Host a cardiologist for a lunch and learn, and provide a heart-healthy meal catered by dieticians. Have a Little Heart to Heart With Employees Serious topics don't have to be boring. Bring some heart to your American Heart Month awareness campaign, and employees are unlikely to forget the importance heart health. All five of the ideas to celebrate American Heart Month above are doable for companies of any size. Early action is critical for heart attack victims, and knowing the warning signs increases the chances of survival when emergency treatment happens fast. By sharing details like warning signs and symptoms and prevention measures, you’ll give your employees information that could one day save their life. Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Checkout these worksheets from Dr. Oz. Hand them out to your residents and co-workers. Information is power. Print Dr. Oz Worksheets Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Buy Now Cinnamon Sweet Tortilla Chips with Fruit Salsa Source: Heart.Org Servings: 8 Serving Size: 6 tortilla chips and ¼ cup salsa Ingredients Cooking spray 2 teaspoons olive oil 12 drops cinnamon-flavored liquid stevia sweetener ½ packet stevia sweetener or ¼ teaspoon stevia sweetner 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon salt 8 6-inch corn tortillas, each cut into 6 wedges 1 medium orange, peeled and diced ½ cup diced mango (from ½ of a medium mango)... Click Button Below to get Full Recipe Heart.Org Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Source: The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  6. 1,772 downloads

    This form should be use to track and document your residents participation in your activity program. The form uses a coding system to note the participation level & the residents reactions, all vital information when designing a plan of care for your residents. Be sure and keep your records up-to-date, keep 3 months of records close at hand for State Surveyors. They usually ask for 4-5 resident files to base your program on, this is a random choosing unless there were complaints for a certain resident.
    Free
  7. Visit our Newsletter Archives We Proudly Support the APNCC Activity Professionals National Credentialing Center! Heart Valentines Day Pop Up Card Source: https://www.easypeasyandfun.com/heart-valentines-day-pop-up-card/ Materials: Scissors Glue Cardstock paper Colored paper Directions Start by folding the cardstock to create a card base. Cut a colored paper with the same size of your card and fold... Click button below for full directions, along with step by step pics! Visit Website FREE Printable Back in the time of the feast of Lupercalia, entrees were understandably quite different. It is said emperors ate exotic things like giraffe and flamingo. We won't be suggesting you serve giraffe here, but we wish to offer inspiration for your foray into Roman foods. Below is a link to more obtainable Roman recipes for you to try with your residents in honer of Valentine's roots. First, let's explore a little bit more about the food culture in Roman times. Roman Flavors Roman food was heavily reliant on fish sauce for its success. Wine, honey, vinegar, oil, and fish sauce are combined to create a balance of sweet, sour, and salty. Sample Roman Banquet Menu Appetizers Jellyfish and eggs Sow's udders stuffed with salted sea urchins Patina of brains cooked with milk and eggs Boiled tree fungi with peppered fish-fat sauce Sea urchins with spices, honey, oil, and egg sauce Main Courses Fallow deer roasted with onion sauce, rue, Jericho dates, raisins, oil, and honey Boiled ostrich with sweet sauce Turtledove boiled in its feathers Roast parrot Dormice stuffed with pork and pine kernels Ham boiled with figs and bay leaves, rubbed with honey, baked in pastry crust Flamingo boiled with dates Desserts Fricassee of roses with pastry Pitted dates stuffed with nuts and pine kernels, fried in honey Hot African sweet-wine cakes with honey A firsthand account of the food served at one of Emperor Nero's "simple" meals. "After a generous rubdown with oil, we put on dinner clothes. We were taken into the next room where we found three couches drawn up and a table, very luxuriously laid out, awaiting us. We were invited to take our seats. Immediately, Egyptian slaves came in and poured ice water over our hands. The starters were served. On a large tray stood a donkey made of bronze. On its back were two baskets, one holding green olives, and the other black. On either side were dormice, dipped in honey and rolled in poppy seed. Nearby, on a silver grill, piping hot, lay small sausages. As for wine, we were fairly swimming in it." - Gaius Petronius (27-66), advisor to Emperor Nero in matters of luxury and extravagance. Source: https://delishably.com/world-cuisine/ancient-food-rome Six Ancient Roman Recipes 1943 Whitmore Chocolate Ad Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  8. Celebrate Christmas Card Day December 9th This is the day to get all those Christmas cards sent off into the world to spread good cheer! You may need to host an activity prior to this to make sure each resident has Christmas cards to send or help them get their cards ordered or purchased. Spend December 9th helping residents fill out, address and mail off their cards. Play Christmas carols, serve a warm festive beverage and Christmas treats, and make a day of it! 48-Pack Christmas Card Bulk Box Set – Holiday Greeting Cards in 6 Cozy Christmas Season’s Greetings Designs with Kraft Envelopes, 4 x 6 Inches Amazon $11.99 Celebrate National Chocolate Covered Anything Day December 16th Time to load up your cart with the good stuff! Everyone loves chocolate, so why not have a little fun with it? On National Chocolate Covered Anything Day, you can create a cart with many food items dipped in chocolate. This works perfectly for food items that you may already have on hand. Below is list of possibilities. Pick what makes the most sense for you, your residents, your budget and your setup. Be sure you serve some milk on the side! Chocolate Covered Possibilities: Peanut Butter Crackers Nutter Butters Oreos Apple Wedges Sweet Potato Chips Strawberries Banana Slice Nuts Churros Pretzels Popcorn Candied Fruit Waffles Variations*: If you have adventurous residents, you may want to create a cart full of unusual chocolate covered food items from around the world. Check out the paraphrased article below for some wacky ideas. 20 Most Unusual Chocolate-Covered Foods From Around The World By Joey Haverford Aug 09, 2018 Source: TheTravel.Com 20. Squid- Chocolate and salty seafood is a tough sell, but it sells just the same! 19. Worms- Served in quite a few places around the world. 18. Onions- Served in Philadelphia candy shops. 17. Slim Jims- This has a small following, mostly limited to Slim Jim aficionados. 16. Lemons- Cherries and strawberries are among the most popular chocolate covered foods int eh world. Lemon is considered one of the most bizarre fruits to dip. 15. Cheerios- One of the tastier options on the list. 14. Chickpeas- This chocolate covered healthy snack is fast becoming more and more popular around the world. 13. Seaweed- This is sold in Korea, but isn't very popular other places. 12. Mushrooms- Created by Justin Cournoyer, a Toronto chef. 11. Bacon- Chocolate covered bacon is one of the top unique food items offered. 10. Carrots- Carrots are on the sweeter side, making them a better fit than most other veggies. 9. Scorpions- Multiple places all over the world serves these as an unusual snack. 8. Edamame- This snack is growing in popularity among healthy eaters. 7. Pickles- Typically on a stick while dipped into chocolate and covered with sprinkles. 6. Potato Chips- Seems like a snack food match made in heaven. 5. Crickets- Believed to be a great source of protein more sustainable than beef or pork. Like scorpions, these are eaten around the world. 4. Broccoli- Broccoli is often being coated in things to make it tastier. Chocolate is one of the wildest ideas out there for it. 3. Cheetos- May not be a huge hit, but recipes are out there for the creative food types. 2. Jalapenos- A combination of a super spicy item and a super sweet item could lead to a horrible result. Proceed with cation. 1. Corn dogs- Likely invented at a carnival or fair. Read Full Article Borden's Egg Nog Ad Circa December 28th, 1954 Celebrate National Egg Nog Day December 24th Enroll Now! ENROLL NOW! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  9. View this email in your browser Halloween, like the rest of the year, is going to be a bit different than usual. As an Activity Director, you are use to making the best of things and this Halloween is no exception. Halloween is known for its mask wearing vibes and it feeds right into our mask wearing quarantine restrictions. Creative shops everywhere are churning out fun and festive masks perfect for Halloween. Just add some eye makeup and your costume is done. You could even take your regular cloth masks and add fun appliques to wear leading up to the big day. Consider having a Halloween mask decorating contest and see who can come up with the most creative mask! Below are some examples to get your wheels turning. Don't forget to decorate some masks for your pumpkin friends! This is a simple activity that all your residents can participate in while adhering to quarantine guidelines. You could even take it room to room for the residents that are unable to leave their rooms. Consider creating two of them.One for staff members and one for your residents. Fill it with all your favorite Halloween treats and provide slips for participants to write their guess on and collect them all in a collection box. Place the candy filled jar out one week prior to Halloween to give everyone a chance to guess. On Halloween, announce the winner! Note: Be sure and have extras in case there are multiple correct guesses. Now comes the fun part! Your Halloween Food Cart! Sure, you could fill it with beautiful jars of colorful candy and cute little cupcake that look like baby pumpkins. Or.... you could get a little dirty this year! Why not load your cart with some super creepy, extra weird, not sure if I can eat that kind of stuff? It will certainly have your whole facility buzzing about it and sneaking over to take a peek. Check out some of the "gross" options below. I tried to pick some simple ones so that you can have as many options as possible on your cart. Share your creations on Facebook! Circa 1960 Curtiss Candy Company Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  10. You may not think you will want to reflect on this time, but one day you will. This is a momentous time and is incomparable to any other health event in our history. You are the front line workers, who are dedicating yourselves day in and day out for the well being of your residents. Take this time to create a capsule that you and your residents can dig up at a later date when the dust has settled so that you can truly take in what you all accomplished. You can never doubt your strengths or resilience again! Quarantine Time Capsule Materials Shoe Box/Plastic Box/Empty Paint Can Markers Shovel Personal Items Examples Pictures A craft made during this time Newspaper articles Thumb drive with documents/conferences/music Grocery store receipt Letter to your future self Journal entry about your current struggles and favorite memories Prediction about how the quarantine will come to an end and when Angel figurine to watch over the capsule Directions Decorate your capsule with phrases or words that represent this time period. Be sure and include the date. In the example picture above, the individual took pictures and coupons ads and used Mod Podge to adhere them to the can. Fill your box with items that you feel you or your residents may benefit from reflecting on in the future. Seal your box closed and bury it somewhere around the facility. Make a map showing where it is buried and hang it in the facility with the planned open date displayed. Choose an open date that is at least one year from the date of creation. Puzzle time looks quite a bit different then it use to around our facilities. Making this easy and quick portable puzzle board gives your residents the freedom to work on their puzzles while in their doorways or other areas that are less isolated then their rooms. You could create a Puzzle Time where your interested residents all come in their doorways with their puzzle boards and work on them together with a bit of distance and socialization. Load your cart up and serve snacks while they work. DIY Portable Puzzle Board Yields 1 Materials 1/2" Board, cut to about 23x30 Decorative Duck Tape Set of Handles Directions Purchase 1/2" scrap wood from your local home improvement store. Most offer a service that will cut the board to the size you need at no extra cost. Wrap the edges with decorative duck tape to prevent splinters and to add style. Screw in handles on either side. Voila! Shot Glass Appetizers Single serve disposable food items are the order of the day! We all need creative ways to serve our residents, while offering a bit of variety into the mix. Enter: Shot Glass Appetizers! These fun recipes give you the opportunity to be creative with your choices, while still being mindful of germs. There are tons of combinations that can be utilized and plastic shot glasses can be purchased relatively inexpensively. Check out some of the options above to get you going. A quick internet search will provide you with tons of ideas and recipes to get you started right away. Cheers! Combination Ideas Veggies and Dill Dip Fruit and Cream Cheese Dip Olive Medley and Feta Cheese Tomato Soup and Mozzarella Cheese Sticks/Grilled Cheese Triangle/Pimento Cheese Triangle Whipped Cream, Strawberry and Angel Food Cake 7 Layer Bean Dip and Tortilla Chip Pudding and Vanilla Wafers Shrimp and Cocktail Sauce or Tartar Sauce Churro Bites and Caramel Sauce Meatballs and Marinara Sauce Vintage Health Poster Circa 1950 Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  11. View this email in your browser Cultural Assimilation (Adaptations) Cultural assimilation can become complicated when a resident can't control his or her life choices and decisions. Causing depression, extreme anxiety, and frustration. Staff can become frustrated if individuals are unwilling to cooperate with care as a result of these fears and anxieties. When residents feel uncomfortable with their surroundings because of language barriers or differences in social norms, they can feel threatened by different and strange-seeming mannerisms. For example, West Indian cultures often speak in loud voices. Asian caregivers are often reserved and might not appear to be as personally supportive. Culture Change Culture is the learned and shared knowledge that specific groups use to generate their behavior and interpret their experience of the world. It includes but is not limited to: Practices, Rituals. Languages, Values, Customs, Expected Behaviors, Roles, Thought, Ceremonies, Beliefs, Courtesies, Manners of Interacting, Communications Culture applies to racial, ethnic, religious, political, professional, and other social groups. It is transmitted through social and institutional traditions and norms that pass onto succeeding generations. Culture can appear paradoxical, while many aspects remain the same, it is also dynamic, constantly changing and evolving throughout the ages. It is comprised of beliefs about how people should interact with each other and how they should respond to the social and material surroundings in which they find themselves. • is applicable to all peoples • is value laden & rooted in belief systems • is active & dynamic • is multilayered & multidimensional • exists at conscious & unconscious levels • is often viewed as thick, thin, or compartmentalized • provides group member identity • structures perceptions & shapes behaviors (e.g. relationship to the natural world or traditional homelands) • varies in expression both among and between individual group members • permeates every aspect of life Culture is seen in religion, spirituality, morals, customs, politics, technologies, and basic survival strategies of any given group. It affects how groups work, parent, love, marry, and understand health, mental health, wellness, illness, disability, and end of life. It is only when we observe the other side that it is possible to reflect upon the similarities as well as the diversities of cultural life values and beliefs held by others. Multiple Cultural Identities Implications for Person-Centered Thinking, Planning and Practice Some individuals willingly adopt distinct cultural identities in different social settings (i.e., home culture versus organizational culture), while still others acquire permeable identities. Individuals draw from the accepted norms from within the cultural climate that surrounds them to behave in accordance with their social setting. This contributes to our understanding of how and when individuals adopt multiple cultural identities. As human beings, we have multiple cultural identities that can be grouped as follows. • Categorization – people identify with one of their cultural groups over others • Compartmentalization – individuals maintain multiple, separate identities within themselves • Integration – people link their multiple cultural identities Understanding multiple cultural identities helps us to move beyond one-dimensional conceptualizations of identity to an understanding of the complex, overlapping cultural influences that form each of us. "ADDRESSING" is a framework that enables therapists to better recognize and understand cultural influences as a multidimensional combination. Developed by Pamela Hays (1996, 2008), the “ADDRESSING” model is a framework that facilitates recognition and understanding of the complexities of individual identity. ... Each factor can help researchers understand underrepresented groups and oppressive forces. A - Age D - Developmental and acquired D - Disabilities R - Religion E - Ethnicity S - Socioeconomic status S - Sexual orientation I - Indigenous heritage, N - National origin, and G - Gender. Source: https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/encouraging-diversity-in-psychology Cultural Diversity The term cultural diversity is used to describe differences in ethnic or racial classification & self-identification, tribal or clan affiliation, nationality, language, age, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, socioeconomic status, education, religion, spirituality, physical and intellectual abilities, personal appearance, and other factors that distinguish one group or individual from another. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Path 2 to NAAPCC Board Certification - If you have 2000hrs of working with the elderly in the past 3yrs, If you have a High School Diploma or equivalent, if you have 36hrs of both Published and (12)Live CE hrs., Included in the NAPT Course. You will be eligible to take the National Certification Competency exam for National Activity Board Certification AP-BC. Call NAAPCC for details, (303) 317-5682 naapcc.office@gmail.com Your Experience Counts! The national certifications recognized under CMS F Tag 680 for Activity Professionals are the NAAPCC AP-BC & AC-BC, NCCAP ADC & ACC, CTRS, OTR, and COTA. American Healthcare Association's Shelter in Place: Planning Resource Guide for Nursing Homes Keep Residents, Staff and Family Members up to date with this blank Covid-19 Newsletter Template. Made simply for your convenience: Step 1: Click on Button below Step 2: Fill in sections with your info. Step 3: Hit print or email. Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  12. Here is a great Do It Yourself project. https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Cloth-Face-Mask/
  13. HIPAA for Activity Directors Activities professionals deal with resident information on a personal level, including but not limited to: family issues, special requests from the resident, newsletter articles, etc. Without a doubt, there is a great deal of detailed personal information that must be monitored to prevent unintended disclosure. The following information will hopefully ease your mind about HIPAA regulations. That way, you will be able to have your calendars, banners, bulletin boards and posters, while being in full compliance with all of the regulations. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), Public Law 104-191, was enacted on August 21, 1996. It details standards for the electronic exchange, privacy and security of health information. These guidelines were initially designed to regulate "individually identifiable" - health information that was transmitted electronically. Since then, the "Privacy Rule" that is defined by HIPAA has expanded that concept. Covered Entities "must" be HIPAA Compliant HIPAA, or Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act of 1996, covers both individuals and organizations. Those who must comply with HIPAA are often called HIPAA-covered entities. This information will focused on Health Care Providers known as nursing homes - specifically health care professionals in the role as Activity Directors. Some of these entities are: Health care providers such as nursing homes, rehab facilities, hospitals or any other facility providing skilled or intensive care. Other entities also included are: Health Plans, Health Care Clearinghouses, and Business associates. Not sure if you are working in a Covered Entity; download this PDF for more details check the following resources. Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Administrative-Simplification/HIPAA-ACA/Downloads/CoveredEntitiesChart20160617.pdf Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Administrative-Simplification/HIPAA-ACA/AreYouaCoveredEntity Personal Health Information (PHI) The specific information targeted under the HIPAA regulations is data known as: "Personal Health Information" or PHI. This would be any data that provides "Individually identifiable health information" - including demographic data. PHI information may be received or created by a facility. It may contain past, present or future health diagnosis, history and/or treatment and is inclusive of payment information for medical services normally found in medical charts and billing files. Portions of such personal information may often be found on bulletin boards, photos, calendars, birthday cards, activity rooms, common areas and activity progress notes. The Nuts and Bolts for Directors There are several ways to keep your department and resident's privacy intact and remain in compliance with HIPAA regulations. Staff orientation must include appropriate training in this area across all interdisciplinary team members. When is PHI distribution approved under HIPAA? There are different allowable ways to exchange medical information. Generally, the facility may provide select PHI details to family members, friends and clergy. The resident's name and room number. The general condition of the resident: - Having a good day today. - Asked to attend sing-a-long group. - Has been a little sad today. The residents' religious affiliation. Note: Be sure to check if your residents have authorized a legal "Health Care Proxy". This appointed person or persons can stipulate the dissemination of any health information or may over-ride permissions as to whom this personal information may be given. That said, the following are scenarios in which you are not allowed to disclose medical information in any circumstances: Never walk away from your computer, laptop or other electronic health record device without shutting down or entering sleep command to close your screen. It is never permissible to momentarily walk away to tend to another matter while leaving personal information visible on your screen. Never carry on conversations in areas lacking privacy within the facility between staff members. There will never be any circumstance when you should discuss or comment about your resident's day within open areas in which the conversation might be accidently overheard; such areas could be hallways, bathrooms, etc. REMEMBER: "THE WALLS HAVE EARS" Any inbound or outbound resident health information whether fax, email, completed forms, and standard mail. Any document must be immediately addressed upon receipt. Under no circumstances should any health information be allowed to remain in waiting within view on your desk, fax machine or open file organizer until you can tend to it. Activity Plans, Bulletin Boards and Other Publications Photographs/Pictures: Ensure that a permission form has been signed by the authorized individual and is filed in the resident's chart. This permission form is mandatory if you plan to take resident pictures. However, once you include the resident's name with that picture, you will be in violation of HIPAA. If you need to use a name (on a bulletin board for example) all you really need to do is ask the resident for permission and document that permission was given. Calendars and Birthday Cards: Simply remove the birth year from any information. You may only provide the residents name, month and day of birth within the given month. For example: Happy Birthday to Teddy – (3/21). It goes without saying that you should never include medical information (diagnoses, dementia items, etc.) on your monthly calendars. Bulletin Boards and Miscellaneous: Documented permissions are worth their weight in gold. In almost every case if you take the proper steps to ask permission, you can prevent any confusion and facility privacy citation during survey. Never add names to pictures. If you absolutely must, be sure to get explicit permission and again document that it was given. However, I would suggest you to steer clear of adding names period to prevent possible confusion. Activity Rooms and Common Areas: Can pictures of residents be used in your common areas? Yes, but once more, be sure that no medical information accompanies those pictures. Additionally, never identify residents by room or unit, especially if that resident resides on a memory/dementia care unit. This information is simply not needed to convey the resident experience through pictures. Activity and Progress Notes: As previously stated, completed resident forms should never lie in waiting, inclusive of all progress notes. These forms must be put away in the individual chart to prevent unwanted viewing of resident privacy information. Never leave it out in the open on your desk to attend to another matter. The only exception would be when you are able to secure (lock) the document in an office. Shreddables Pure and Simple...you bear the responsibility of ensuring that no "unauthorized" eyes are able to view resident health information. This also applies to any documentation that is no longer required for record retention. "Record retention guidelines" outline how long resident & treatment records must be retained. Records deemed to expire must be permanently disposed of by way of shredding. Always check with your facility Administrator to ensure your understanding of how and when shredding services are utilized by your facility. The major goal of the Privacy Rule is to assure that individuals' health information is properly protected while allowing the flow of health information needed to provide and promote high quality health care and to protect the public's health and well being. Source: https://managemypractice.com/cms-releases-record-retention-guidelines/?print=print Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/CMSRecordsSchedule For more detailed HIPAA information: https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/privacy/laws-regulations/index.html https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/training/index.html Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident's individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  14. 1 : 1 Activity Planning Form - DIY for Assistants or Volunteers View File This form is designed to record your One on One Activity Programs from start to finish on paper, so that anyone assisting with an Activity would be able to conduct the event. This form includes the Opening and Closing dialogue to start and finish the activity. Setup, Supplies needed, Goals, Special considerations. Keep a logbook with all of your most frequently used Sensory / 1:1 activities in a folder incase your assistants or your volunteers need to conduct an Activity in your absense. Submitter actnet Submitted 03/02/2020 Category Newsletters, Calendars, Forms, Puzzles, PrintOuts, FunFacts  
  15. Version 1.0.0

    264 downloads

    This form is designed to record your One on One Activity Programs from start to finish on paper, so that anyone assisting with an Activity would be able to conduct the event. This form includes the Opening and Closing dialogue to start and finish the activity. Setup, Supplies needed, Goals, Special considerations. Keep a logbook with all of your most frequently used Sensory / 1:1 activities in a folder incase your assistants or your volunteers need to conduct an Activity in your absense.
    Free
  16. +1 Hi Everyone!! Or, As the Irish in Ireland say "Dia Dhuit! (May God Be With You!) I hope you're all having a great day wherever you are while you're reading this..because as we all know as evidenced by the sudden loss of Kobe Bryant that tomorrow is not a given..! So let's all make the best of every day as I try to do and live in the present..! Most problems are fears of the future. Or worries from the past. If you live in the present they don't exist. In the present you're alive as you can be.Your decisions are spontaneous, your heart is open. Your spirit is free! So. Let's Enjoy Life! The time is Now! And let's not think about our looming health crisis either with the Corona Virus.. can you believe that some people actually thought that it was caused by beer???! That really made me laugh!! I'm sure sales of Corona's went down for a time..Enough doom and gloom!! And speaking of the NOW tickets are NOW on SALE! Ahead of my aforementioned timeline of tomorrow..February 1! So.. feel free to go to my website or grab and envelope and let's plan on seeing each other on March 15th for a fabulous celebration of LIFE and LAUGHTER!! It's all set, you'll hear a masterful Irish Mandolinist/Banjo player upon entering, the room will be in Oh So Irish Green.. you know how i love to decorate! And then you'll be entertained by our wonderful Irish Dancers and our jaw dropping Irish fiddler and then our Almost All Irish comedians..'cept for Marty Ross who's as Irish as I am! Not! Nevertheless let's hear from you.. yes, group discounts apply for tables of 8 or more! I'm very excited to be bringing you this show as we can all use a great afternoon of fun.. and did i also mention prizes!! We'll have some of those too from our wonderful sponsors..! Irish Fun Facts.. Did you know? Ireland is responsible for a lot of inventions such as Color photography, Whiskey Distilling, Ejector Seats, Guided Missiles, Guinness, Hypodermic Syringes, Modern Tractors, Tanks, TransAtlantic Calls, Flavored Crisps, Portable defibrillator and Rubber-soled shoes. Bet you didn't know that.. neither did I!??! All for now, Have a Great Super Bowl Weekend! Always, or Mise Le Meas! (Sincerely in Gaelic) I Live to Laugh! Bonnie Barchichat Executive Producer Senior Comedy Afternoons.com 714-914.2565 P.S. Please share this email with friends who can use some more fun, laughter and sociability in their life and then please feel free to give me physical addresses to add on to our growing mailing list. Who doesn't like mail!? P.P.S. Sponsors.. If you're Senior Friendly and want to meet our Audience here's your opportunity! Drop me a line and say "tell me more!" www.Here's the Proud Bird! Don't forget to email me what you'd like to have for lunch! All orders must be in by March 9th! ©2020 Senior Comedy Afternoons LLC. | 2313 Nelson Avenue, Redondo Beach, Ca. 90278
  17. Giving Back: A Year of Charitable Activities Meaning and purpose in one’s life must be created and encouraged through selecting experiences and activities that feed the soul. To be in need is one of the most motivating factors in longevity and feeling joy. Being an Activity Director is in itself such a choice. We all seek to be of service. Perhaps the biggest barrier is not knowing where to start in this quest. This workshop is full of activity ideas to set you up for an entire year of charitable activities! Ongoing Activities are presented to guide you in creating activities that stretch out over the year, ensuring a more personal and lasting contribution to your community. Monthly Activities are provided to encourage fresh ways of giving back more frequently. I am certain you and your residents will make a real impact on the lives of those around you. Topics Covered: Health Benefits of Giving Ongoing Activities Monthly Activities Start Your Own Charity Ongoing Activity Example Pen Pals Program Summary: Create a Pen Pal Program where your residents can exchange letters, pictures, etc. with residents from another facility. Directions: Have all interested residents sign up so you have a head count. Create a form for each participant to sign stating they understand and agree to not use offensive language, inappropriate storytelling, and anything else you wish to use for your guidelines. Be sure and note in the form that you reserve the right to read any of their material for assurances if need be that way no one feels violated in the event you need to check. Once you have your list complete call some of your neighboring facilities and get your fellow Activity Director on board to do the same. You can then match residents at random and let the fun begin! Variation: Try creating the program with residents from a facility in a faraway state. This will allow for more interesting exchange of information. If your residents need help getting going you and your fellow Activity Director could come up with specific topics to cover for each given writing period. Topics can include childhood, first love, best friends, big adventures, parenthood, etc. Some of your residents may want to participate but are unable to physically write their letters. Ask some of your residents to volunteer their time and help them write their letters. Monthly Activity Example April National Pet Day - Few things break my heart quite like seeing an abandoned animal with no home to call their own. There is something about their innocence that makes any pain inflicted on them simply unbearable to me. You don’t have to be an animal lover to experience the desire to assist our fellow creatures. I am sure many of your resident’s feel that exact same way. There are some ways you can help that seem obvious, such as volunteering time at a shelter or donating animal food and toys or homemade dog biscuits to your local ASPCA, but there are also some ways you may not have thought about. I certainly didn’t until I was researching the topic for this course. These include: Recycle - Recycling your trash prevents it from filling a dump that then encroaches upon the natural habitat of countless animals. Don’t Litter - keeping your trash in cans and picking up other people’s litter prevent animals from ingesting any poison or choking hazards. It also prevents it from clogging up any waterways that are used like highways for creatures. Plant Native - Planting native plants all around your facility ensures that your local wildlife will thrive in their natural habitat. Not Tested on Animals - Make a policy to not purchase stuff for your department that has been tested on animals. Fresh Water - Make sure there are plenty of outside locations that provide fresh water for birds and such. Whichever avenue you choose to take be sure and create an educational activity around it where you can impart some wisdom about the animal/s you are trying to help. Knowledge is key and makes it harder to ignore those in need. This is true no matter the topic. Giving Back: A Year of Charitable Activities 5 CEs for $49.95 BUY NOW! BUY NOW! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  18. I Am Bored: Brainstorming to Alleviate Resident Boredom by Kathleen Hughes, ADC There are lots of postings lately on the numerous Facebook pages for Activity Professionals about how the residents do not like their activities or that residents, families and other staff are bored with the activities offered. There are other comments about how residents ask for specific activities and then do not attend or ignore requests for preferences or suggestions. We also have “younger” residents looking for activities that they are interested in and do not want to be with the “older” residents. Perhaps we are asking the wrong questions and not empowering the residents to make their own calendar of events to encourage them to participate actively or to buy into the activity and have some stake in the game. The residents who actively participate in the planning and implementation of the activity would be more likely to attend and encourage others to attend. During a Brainstorming Workshop my coworkers and I learned a technique that allowed for the free flow of ideas and encouraged the participants to give ideas they may not have thought of. Using these techniques on a quarterly basis at the facility we created new activities, different activities and our activity calendar changed every single month. The only constant was the time of the programs, but the activity itself changed and always changed for the good. Brainstorming follows a specific path that you would need to use to be successful. First, you will need flip charts, markers and tape. These tools will assist with the flow of ideas and staff can help with the process so that they can be a part of it and see what the residents are thinking of. Appoint an Activities Committee as part of your Resident Council if you have one. If you do not have one, then invite all of the residents. Serve a snack and beverage and have them in a circle where they can see all that is being written down. Make sure that the people writing down the ideas write in large print so all can see. Each quarter you would ask the following questions (substitute the season for each question on a quarterly basis): What did you do as a kid in the summer? What did you do with your family in the summer? What is your fondest memory of a summer vacation? What is the best thing you ever did in the summer? Ask one question at a time and give the residents time to respond and reminisce. There are no “bad” answers as the point is to get as many ideas as possible. Do not discourage any of the ideas or thoughts. Write down everything that the residents say. Each idea builds on the other so having the ideas written on the flip chart paper will encourage them to expand upon other’s ideas. For example, we had residents discuss having a lemonade booth, going to the fair, swimming in the lakes, fishing, playing kick the can, making a tree house, renting a cottage on a lake, playing hopscotch, listening to music, sleeping in a tent in their backyard with the kids from the neighborhood, riding their bikes all through town, going to a drive in theater, learning how to hula hoop, clambakes, catching frogs, catching lighting bugs in a jar, campfires, cooking on an open fire, eating vegetables off the vine from their garden, spitting watermelon seeds and running through a sprinkler. We then took the 17 pieces of paper and hung them in the activities office so that we could all generate ideas. Then a week later we gathered a group of residents again and asked them which ideas we could use to plan activities for the summer. Please, remember we did this in April so that we could plan out the summer. We reconvened in August to plan for the Fall. Planning ahead is extremely important to the process. The group then looked over the memories and ideas and placed the activities on an extra-large calendar for the months of June, July and August. We went through all of the listed activities and some were accepted and some were placed on hold. The residents and the activities staff went through the planning process for each month. Keeping the activities we could not change such as religious services and Resident Council. The rest of our days and evenings were up for grabs. Each participant was given a copy of a completed calendar to take with them and asked to talk to other residents about what we had come up with and then get back to the activities staff if anyone had any other ideas. A week later we then had the entire summer schedule completed and ready to implement. Many of the ideas were incorporated into the calendar, including all of the above ideas. Our lemonade stand made $200 that summer and we had a campfire with our neighborhood fire department in our parking lot. We also had residents make the decorations for the events, they made invitations for residents and families, they would also make handouts and door prizes for those that attended and participated so that they could share memories about the programs. When the residents made the table decorations they were very proud of what they created and could not wait to learn who would win them when the event was over. Involving the residents in the brainstorming session and implementation of their ideas encourages creativity and enthusiasm. The staff also became more creative and tried new ideas for activities. The residents got used to the process and would talk among themselves for the upcoming season. Younger residents got to have some innovative activities and the older residents would attend just to see what was up! Give it a try, the key to the entire process is to look at the possibilities and do not have any negative interjections. Each thought, memory and idea should be considered and adapted for the residents. You can also acknowledge the residents that participated and helped plan the activities. Everyone has to be positive and encourage participation in the process. Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of Our Network. Proud Members Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  19. Make a Difference Day October 26, 2019 by M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP This day is an unofficial secular holiday or observance focused on community service and volunteer efforts. Traditionally celebrated on the fourth Saturday in October since 1992. All across the United States volunteers perform projects for their community, for individuals in need and a number of charitable organizations. This October 26th millions of volunteers will come together to honor “Make a Difference Day.” This day is observed as one of the largest and most widely recognized days for community service efforts. Volunteers actively engage in environmental tasks, charity fund raising such as bake sales local food banks, donate their time to nursing homes and women’s safe haven centers, and a host of many other activities. Not only to celebrate but to create awareness that people can truly make a difference when joining forces with actions to improve the quality of life for so many individuals. One of the most rewarding things about “Make a Difference Day” is that it matters not the volunteer age or background, we can all help others. We can give back to the communities and profoundly change the world. Senior Volunteer Programs do Making a Difference Older adults participating in volunteer programs will find it extremely rewarding on a number of levels. While there are a variety of groups and places the older adult can choose to support, the choice is often based more so on becoming involved in something that allows the volunteer to feel useful once again. The rewards gained from acceptance while volunteering to help others is immeasurable and as a whole, the wise elder appreciates and benefits tremendously from the experience. Whether it’s within their own nursing home, community center, adult day health center, or assisted living facility there are so many avenues and opportunities for older adults to really “make a difference” through volunteer services. Note: Adults over the age of 55 comprised nearly 36% of the 62.6 million volunteers, with 10% of the volunteers being 75 years old or older. https://www.leisurecare.com/resources/benefits-of-volunteering-seniors/ Volunteering Benefits Volunteering has important emotional and physical health benefits for the volunteer – especially when that volunteer happens to be an older adult. Depending on availability of time and the level of energy your resident possesses, you will find plenty of ways for seniors to experience the benefits from volunteering opportunities. Here’s a list of just a few possibilities and their respective benefits: Children - Teach them well. We all know that seniors are great stories tellers. Pair your residents up with youngsters by holding an Intergenerational Program. Seniors can volunteer during story hour and tell the little ones about history because they’ve lived through it firsthand. Who does not love to hear wonderful accounts of days of the past filled with curiosity and adventure? Additionally, children whom otherwise may not have previous experience with elders will learn to accept those imperfections that come with aging and come to respect and value the elder’s wisdom. Pay It Forward – The resident as a student then becomes the teacher. Plan to kick leisure pursuits up a notch by creating a “resident to resident volunteer program.” This would be one to one or small groups. Encourage those elders that have learned new found skills in technology, crafting, cooking, etc. to share what they have learned with their fellow residents. It is an opportunity for your resident to pay it forward. This is a dual benefiting experience both for the resident sharing knowledge and the resident learning something new. The added bonus it that it makes way for wonderful resident friendships. Supporting the Community - Volunteering for organizations and services gets seniors out into the community and is a great way to instill a sense of purpose and responsibility while also encouraging social engagement and friendships. A recent study of adults over the age of 60 who volunteer reported higher levels of well-being and lower disability than those who did not volunteer. Note: Current regulations specify that community involvement opportunities must be in place within senior care facilities. Where Seniors can Volunteer If you want to volunteer with seniors you can contact a number of services and programs within your local area. If you’re not sure where to go there are many organizations that can help you find a place where your older adults’ services are needed. Here’s a look at some to contact: Elder Helpers National Council on Aging AARP Volunteer Match Volunteers of America Meals on Wheels One Foster Grandparent's Rebound Anna Nelson, 70, a Foster Grandparent volunteer with five- and six-year-olds in Knoxville, Tenn., for the past three years, can attest to the study’s results. “I’m not depressed anymore. My blood pressure has come down. My blood work is now normal. My cholesterol level is down,” said Nelson, one of 500 Senior Corps volunteers in Knoxville. In addition, Nelson said, “I’ve lost weight from being more active with the kids. They get me moving.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2019/03/12/the-volunteering-that-makes-people-55-healthier/#7672e1cde5e8 Note: According to the Corporation for National Community & Service, the most common forms of volunteering are: Collecting, serving, preparing, or distributing food Fundraising or selling items to raise money Engaging in general labor, like helping build homes or clean up parks Tutoring or teaching Mentoring the youth Collecting, making, or distributing clothing No matter if it’s walking dogs at the local Humane Society, building a home for Habitat for Humanity or restocking books at the local library, volunteering keeps seniors physically active. Maintaining physical fitness and an active lifestyle can prevent a number of injuries and prevent or delay the onset of some diseases. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org BUY Now Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  20. Progress Notes by Kathy Hughes, ADC ActivityDirector.org Recently there has been conversation on social media sites concerning the need for activities to complete progress notes on a quarterly basis. This can also mean a quarterly and annual reassessment of the resident. Let us look at what a “Standard of Practice” is for Activities: Standards of Practice are a “how to” of a discipline. They can include policy statements, standard operating procedures, activity practice protocols and procedures for specific activities. Policy statements clarify the scope and authority of activities stating who, what and when an activity takes place. It also covers the scope of practice for the activities department. A scope of practice may be that activities cannot diagnose a specific disease or disability. The Standards of Practice also include the documentation requirements as set forth by the federal government and regulations of each state. These standards may not appear in the Activities section of the regulations but may appear in the Clinical records portion of the regulations. A policy is written by the Activities Director for the Activities Department. Once a policy is instituted the Activities Department must abide by what is written. A procedure is how the policy will be performed and how the Activities Department will do the activity. When being inspected, a surveyor might look first at the federal regulations then the state regulations and if there is a question then the facility policy and procedure. In the past some facilities received a deficiency when they did not follow their written policy and procedures. We have looked at the federal regulations for the US and found information that there were some references to progress notes for all disciplines, but not activities specifically. Although there are no regulations for having to do quarterly progress notes for activities, it is a Standard of Practice for the Activities profession. It is also a policy and procedure in most nursing homes. Surveyors are directed to look at “Physician’s, nurse’s, social worker's and other staff members progress notes, as applicable” in many areas of the CMS (Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services) regulations. “Other staff members progress notes” would be where the Activities Department falls. State by State Regulations Some state regulations specifically state that quarterly progress notes are required by the Activities Department. There are other states that only follow the CMS Regulations. It would be up to the Activities professional to find their specific state regulations for the need for a progress note. Here is a link to the “Clinical Records Regulations” for each state: http://www.hpm.umn.edu/nhregsplus/NH%20Regs%20by%20Topic/NH%20Regs%20Topic%20Pdfs/Clinical%20Records/category-administration-clinical%20records-final.pdf You can access your state regulations for activities by using this link: http://www.hpm.umn.edu/nhregsplus/NH%20Regs%20by%20Topic/Topic%20Quality%20of%20Life.html#statecompare You can also go directly to your state Department of Health and do a search for your specific regulations. In Summary... The Activities Department should do quarterly progress notes as a Standard of Practice. We have valuable information to share with the staff, the physician and the other teams. The residents have unique needs and interests that need to be documented and their progress in activities could impact their medical conditions and their progress in the facility. In our never ending quest to be accepted as a valuable member of the facility team writing progress notes, actively contributing to the care plan and having a detailed Initial Activities Assessment lets others recognize the Activity professionals as a modality to improve the residents quality of life. Have a question for Kathy? Email questions and comments to kathyhughes@activitydirector.com. Thank You. ENROLL Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  21. Bucket of Games 1 Bucket of Games 2 SALE Ends Aug 5th 1.888.238.0444 Our NCCAP MEPAP 1 & 2 Begins Aug 6th - Make sure your Activity Staff is qualified before your next Survey ActivityDirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  22. Activity Directors have traditionally planned and understood the importance of continuing their resident’s religion within the facility. Often multiple religious activities are planned weekly in order to meet the needs of those they serve. Things they are changing, though. According to a study conducted by the PEW Research Center from 2012 to 2017, approximately 27% of U.S. adults identify as ‘Spiritual but Not Religious’, with 75% identifying as both. This may seem like a vague identification and it certainly leaves the Activity Director in uncharted waters when it comes to planning activities for it. First, we must understand what ‘Spiritual but Not Religious ’ means. It is defined as a life stance that does not believe that organized religion is the best or only path to personal spiritual development. In other words, spiritual people prefer a more customized approach, which can add another layer of complication while trying to plan for multiple people. The spiritual quest is ever evolving and the direction it goes in comes from the resident’s internal ques within. One week they may wish to work on past regrets, while the next week finds them guided towards meditation or mindfulness. Spirituality is not a one size fits all in the same way uniform religion is. For this reason, the Activity Director will need to stay in close communication with their residents and take their inspiration from their needs. In order to make your job a bit easier we have provided a list of suggested spiritual activities that may help guide you and your resident as you take on this noble quest. Spiritual Activity Starters Meditation and Yoga- There are numerous guided meditations available for purchase or free on YouTube. Jason Stephenson is a good place to start. Research a guided yoga program that suits your residents. There is such a thing as chair yoga, which might be ideal. Mindfulness- Practicing being in the present moment during daily activities. Create activities that keep the resident tuned into what they are doing. This would include activities that require concentration such as painting, crafting, puzzles, playing an instrument, or learning to do familiar things in a new way (i.e. writing an entire letter using their non-dominant hand). Slant these activities towards the spiritual side of things and make it known that the overall goal is to remain mindful and alert. Shadow Work- According to Lonerwolf (a respected site that specializes in soul work), "shadow work is the attempt to uncover everything that we have disowned and rejected within our Shadow Selves". These are all of the things we dislike about ourselves or were taught to dislike, perhaps even impulses that would be considered vile if carried out. This is deep work and Lonerwolf recommends that you attempt shadow work only after establishing a strong degree of self-love. Spirituality Book Club- Spiritualists love a good “self-help” book. There are so many fascinating books on the topic and many can be found directly through the publisher or on Amazon. Some of my favorite spiritual publishers and authors are Hay House, Sounds True, Eckhart Tolle, Michael Singer, Brene Brown and Wayne Dyer. A book by any of these authors is sure to generate much reflection and communication for the book club. Conscious Dancing- This basically involves free style dancing. Turn on some tunes and encourage your residents to move freely to the music. They may feel embarrassed to do this, as most of our lives are dictated by socially acceptable behavior, however you can make the difference in their comfort level by displaying your own. This could also be undertaken in smaller groups until participants feel more free and confident. Another option is to begin by having the resident remain seated, close their eyes and move their arms freely. Overtime you will have a room full of free birds! Chanting- Chanting is another one of those activities that can feel silly to do at first and this makes it a bit off putting to many. However, it is believed that as you are chanting something is slowly transforming within you. I would recommend beginning by having residents listen to a chanting video or audio on YouTube to warm to the idea of chanting themselves. Set the tone by dimming the lights and having residents close their eyes and focusing on the chant. Chants are generally in another language so make sure you select the right one for your residents and inform them of the translation. In Closing... These are just a few of the possible spiritual activities you could plan for. The most important thing is that you allow for flexibility and modifications to suit your residents. The ‘Spiritual but Not Religion ’ mindset is one of fluidity and honoring oneself. The very fact that you are attempting to modernize your program to encompass all belief systems is admirable and so beneficial. You can be certain that as spirituality gains broader acceptance and becomes more mainstream you will be called upon to adapt your calendar. Some of these practices will benefit many of your residents, spiritual or not, therefor beginning to incorporate these ideas now will surely serve you and your department now and in the very near future. Namaste (I bow to you). Resources: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/09/06/more-americans-now-say-theyre-spiritual-but-not-religious/ https://lonerwolf.com/shadow-work-demons/ https://www.spiritualawakeningprocess.com/2014/11/10-fun-spiritual-things-to-do.html Enroll Now NCCAP MEPAP 1&2 Starts Aug 6th - 16week Online Class required for NCCAP Certification. Instructor: Kathleen Hughes, ADC,EDU http://www.activitydirector.org At-Your-Own-Pace format available to Start Anytime - Take upto 1yr. Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  23. July is National Ice Cream Month!!!!!! Did You Know... ... some studies have shown that people buy and consume more ice cream on a Sunday than any other day of the week? Ice cream is an easy summer fundraiser that always draws a crowd of willing consumers. Now is the time to raise money for those items you are needing for your department. Take advantage of the hot days and Ice Cream Month by hosting a couple of events starring ice cream. Ice Cream Bar Fundraiser Ingredients: Ice Cream Strawberry/Pineapple/Chocolate/Caramel Ice Cream Topping Cherries, to top off the sundae with Nuts Whipping Cream, in can Cups Spoons Napkins Ice Cream Scoops Directions: Pick a day to hold this fundraiser that falls on or just after payday. Make up lots of flyers and post them around the facility, especially the break room and main entrances to your facility. Your target market should be staff, residents, volunteers and family members so consider where they me come into contact with your flyers. Note on the flyer what the sundae sales will be used for i.e. a good cause. Include all pertinent information about the event and what the charge will be per sundae. Ask residents to help you prepare and serve for this special fundraiser. Ice Cream Competition Have staff and family members make “Homemade Ice Cream” and bring it in on a weekend for this competition. Ask residents to participate by hosting a tasting and judging on their favorite flavor. Prior to the event create flyers and a newsletter write up. Ask individuals willing to make ice cream to sign up and also request participants RSVP so you have an idea of how much ice cream will be needed. NOTE: When I did this I found that family was not willing to make ice cream, however they were happy to donate money for the event. I then borrowed as many ice cream makers as I could find and made different flavors up in the Activity Department all week long and stored them in the freezer until the event. FYI, Coffee was our winner! Side Note: If you serve Banana Splits or coke floats at your Resident Council meetings, attendance will surely rise! The Scoop on Ice Cream Before milk based ice creams were introduced in 10th century, this summer treat was indeed made from ice. Industrial production of ice cream begun in 1851 in Boston, United States. The largest worldwide consumption of ice cream is in United States. There, one average person consumes 48 pints of ice cream per year. The most popular flavor of ice cream is vanilla. After it come chocolates, strawberry, cookies n’ cream, and others. Ice cream cones were invented during 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis, when large demand forced ice cream vendor to find help from nearby waffle vendors. Together they made history. One of the most unusual ice cream flavors is hot dog flavored ice-cream that was created in Arizona, US. Continental Europe was introduced with ice cream in late 13th century with Marko Polo returned to Italy with his tales of travel in China. Historians remember that Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) loved to eat snow flavored with nectar and honey. Hawaii is a home to an “ice cream bean”, fruit that tastes like vanilla ice cream. In United States, July is deemed to be "National Ice Cream Month". Most favorite ice cream topping is chocolate syrup. One cone of ice cream can be finished off in 50 licks. California is the larger producer of ice cream in United States. During 2003 they alone made 121 million gallons of this cold treat. It takes 12 gallons of milk to create one gallon of ice cream. Ice cream “Brain Freeze” effect is triggered when cold ice touches the roof of your mouth, which causes blood vessels in the head to dilate. End of the World War II was celebrated by eating ice cream. Source: http://www.icecreamhistory.net/ice-cream-facts/interesting-facts-about-ice-cream/ Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  24. Senior Comedy Afternoon is an excellent Activity for any Senior Group.. Plan to attend and make a day of it.. 3 Course Meal, a Show .. all presented by Bonnie and her bunch of Misfits.. if you haven't experienced one of these "Afternoons" you're missing Out. the Event is in LA... near LAX ..the recently refurbished The Proud Bird Restaurant and Event Center (Tuskegee Room) Starts at Noon, Lunch at noon-thirty and the show is at 1:30.. and a guided tour of the Air Park can be enjoyed after the show. 3:15 July 14th, plenty of time to plan and reserve your buses.. dontmissthis Have Fun! Pennie
  25. An important topic of conversation amongst Activity Directors is the hesitancy of other departments within our facilities to help out with activities. At Activity Directors Network we are constantly getting inquiries about the rules regarding this sensitive and unique subject. For this reason, I thought it would be helpful to introduce you to the CMS Critical Pathways form which is designed to help you determine compliance. Critical Path Methodology has been around awhile. It has been used in every industry to help build processes and procedures using measurable statistics to determine the best route to achieve success and determine where and when failure occurs. This is why it is such a useful tool for Activity Directors to utilize. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have published documents related to the new State Survey process that went into effect 2017, and are being enforced as of 2018. The survey process combines the traditional survey and the QIS survey investigation methods. These new methods include Critical Element Pathways to help surveyors determine compliance, and you can use it to help your programs shine! Here is the link to the form: CMS-20065_ActivitiesCriticalPathways.pdf http://www.activitydirector.net/images/CMS-20065_ActivitiesCriticalPathways.pdf Use this form to determine if your facility activities are in compliance. Create a worksheet for your Activity Program that will help you to identify factors that may contribute to failure and/or deficiencies. It’s been my experience that facility procedures need to be updated and that the entire facility would benefit from better education in this area. It can be hard to bring this matter up to the other departments and creating tension from opposing viewpoints would only be counterproductive. This is how the form can help substantiate and legitimize your goal. Use the form to identify any potential deficiencies and then create an in-service to educate the staff. Presenting a well-researched plan to your Administrator and fellow department heads increases your potential for making a difference and solving any issues that have arisen out of an outdated approach. Hopefully, this form will help to bolster your confidence moving forward. Thanks for being a part of The Network, Pennie Bacon, Resource Director Activity Directors Network
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