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  1. Make a Difference Day October 26, 2019 by M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP This day is an unofficial secular holiday or observance focused on community service and volunteer efforts. Traditionally celebrated on the fourth Saturday in October since 1992. All across the United States volunteers perform projects for their community, for individuals in need and a number of charitable organizations. This October 26th millions of volunteers will come together to honor “Make a Difference Day.” This day is observed as one of the largest and most widely recognized days for community service efforts. Volunteers actively engage in environmental tasks, charity fund raising such as bake sales local food banks, donate their time to nursing homes and women’s safe haven centers, and a host of many other activities. Not only to celebrate but to create awareness that people can truly make a difference when joining forces with actions to improve the quality of life for so many individuals. One of the most rewarding things about “Make a Difference Day” is that it matters not the volunteer age or background, we can all help others. We can give back to the communities and profoundly change the world. Senior Volunteer Programs do Making a Difference Older adults participating in volunteer programs will find it extremely rewarding on a number of levels. While there are a variety of groups and places the older adult can choose to support, the choice is often based more so on becoming involved in something that allows the volunteer to feel useful once again. The rewards gained from acceptance while volunteering to help others is immeasurable and as a whole, the wise elder appreciates and benefits tremendously from the experience. Whether it’s within their own nursing home, community center, adult day health center, or assisted living facility there are so many avenues and opportunities for older adults to really “make a difference” through volunteer services. Note: Adults over the age of 55 comprised nearly 36% of the 62.6 million volunteers, with 10% of the volunteers being 75 years old or older. https://www.leisurecare.com/resources/benefits-of-volunteering-seniors/ Volunteering Benefits Volunteering has important emotional and physical health benefits for the volunteer – especially when that volunteer happens to be an older adult. Depending on availability of time and the level of energy your resident possesses, you will find plenty of ways for seniors to experience the benefits from volunteering opportunities. Here’s a list of just a few possibilities and their respective benefits: Children - Teach them well. We all know that seniors are great stories tellers. Pair your residents up with youngsters by holding an Intergenerational Program. Seniors can volunteer during story hour and tell the little ones about history because they’ve lived through it firsthand. Who does not love to hear wonderful accounts of days of the past filled with curiosity and adventure? Additionally, children whom otherwise may not have previous experience with elders will learn to accept those imperfections that come with aging and come to respect and value the elder’s wisdom. Pay It Forward – The resident as a student then becomes the teacher. Plan to kick leisure pursuits up a notch by creating a “resident to resident volunteer program.” This would be one to one or small groups. Encourage those elders that have learned new found skills in technology, crafting, cooking, etc. to share what they have learned with their fellow residents. It is an opportunity for your resident to pay it forward. This is a dual benefiting experience both for the resident sharing knowledge and the resident learning something new. The added bonus it that it makes way for wonderful resident friendships. Supporting the Community - Volunteering for organizations and services gets seniors out into the community and is a great way to instill a sense of purpose and responsibility while also encouraging social engagement and friendships. A recent study of adults over the age of 60 who volunteer reported higher levels of well-being and lower disability than those who did not volunteer. Note: Current regulations specify that community involvement opportunities must be in place within senior care facilities. Where Seniors can Volunteer If you want to volunteer with seniors you can contact a number of services and programs within your local area. If you’re not sure where to go there are many organizations that can help you find a place where your older adults’ services are needed. Here’s a look at some to contact: Elder Helpers National Council on Aging AARP Volunteer Match Volunteers of America Meals on Wheels One Foster Grandparent's Rebound Anna Nelson, 70, a Foster Grandparent volunteer with five- and six-year-olds in Knoxville, Tenn., for the past three years, can attest to the study’s results. “I’m not depressed anymore. My blood pressure has come down. My blood work is now normal. My cholesterol level is down,” said Nelson, one of 500 Senior Corps volunteers in Knoxville. In addition, Nelson said, “I’ve lost weight from being more active with the kids. They get me moving.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2019/03/12/the-volunteering-that-makes-people-55-healthier/#7672e1cde5e8 Note: According to the Corporation for National Community & Service, the most common forms of volunteering are: Collecting, serving, preparing, or distributing food Fundraising or selling items to raise money Engaging in general labor, like helping build homes or clean up parks Tutoring or teaching Mentoring the youth Collecting, making, or distributing clothing No matter if it’s walking dogs at the local Humane Society, building a home for Habitat for Humanity or restocking books at the local library, volunteering keeps seniors physically active. Maintaining physical fitness and an active lifestyle can prevent a number of injuries and prevent or delay the onset of some diseases. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org BUY Now Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  2. 622 downloads

    This form should be use to track and document your residents participation in your activity program. The form uses a coding system to note the participation level & the residents reactions, all vital information when designing a plan of care for your residents. Be sure and keep your records up-to-date, keep 3 months of records close at hand for State Surveyors. They usually ask for 4-5 resident files to base your program on, this is a random choosing unless there were complaints for a certain resident.

    Free

  3. Progress Notes by Kathy Hughes, ADC ActivityDirector.org Recently there has been conversation on social media sites concerning the need for activities to complete progress notes on a quarterly basis. This can also mean a quarterly and annual reassessment of the resident. Let us look at what a “Standard of Practice” is for Activities: Standards of Practice are a “how to” of a discipline. They can include policy statements, standard operating procedures, activity practice protocols and procedures for specific activities. Policy statements clarify the scope and authority of activities stating who, what and when an activity takes place. It also covers the scope of practice for the activities department. A scope of practice may be that activities cannot diagnose a specific disease or disability. The Standards of Practice also include the documentation requirements as set forth by the federal government and regulations of each state. These standards may not appear in the Activities section of the regulations but may appear in the Clinical records portion of the regulations. A policy is written by the Activities Director for the Activities Department. Once a policy is instituted the Activities Department must abide by what is written. A procedure is how the policy will be performed and how the Activities Department will do the activity. When being inspected, a surveyor might look first at the federal regulations then the state regulations and if there is a question then the facility policy and procedure. In the past some facilities received a deficiency when they did not follow their written policy and procedures. We have looked at the federal regulations for the US and found information that there were some references to progress notes for all disciplines, but not activities specifically. Although there are no regulations for having to do quarterly progress notes for activities, it is a Standard of Practice for the Activities profession. It is also a policy and procedure in most nursing homes. Surveyors are directed to look at “Physician’s, nurse’s, social worker's and other staff members progress notes, as applicable” in many areas of the CMS (Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services) regulations. “Other staff members progress notes” would be where the Activities Department falls. State by State Regulations Some state regulations specifically state that quarterly progress notes are required by the Activities Department. There are other states that only follow the CMS Regulations. It would be up to the Activities professional to find their specific state regulations for the need for a progress note. Here is a link to the “Clinical Records Regulations” for each state: http://www.hpm.umn.edu/nhregsplus/NH%20Regs%20by%20Topic/NH%20Regs%20Topic%20Pdfs/Clinical%20Records/category-administration-clinical%20records-final.pdf You can access your state regulations for activities by using this link: http://www.hpm.umn.edu/nhregsplus/NH%20Regs%20by%20Topic/Topic%20Quality%20of%20Life.html#statecompare You can also go directly to your state Department of Health and do a search for your specific regulations. In Summary... The Activities Department should do quarterly progress notes as a Standard of Practice. We have valuable information to share with the staff, the physician and the other teams. The residents have unique needs and interests that need to be documented and their progress in activities could impact their medical conditions and their progress in the facility. In our never ending quest to be accepted as a valuable member of the facility team writing progress notes, actively contributing to the care plan and having a detailed Initial Activities Assessment lets others recognize the Activity professionals as a modality to improve the residents quality of life. Have a question for Kathy? Email questions and comments to kathyhughes@activitydirector.com. Thank You. ENROLL Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  4. Bucket of Games 1 Bucket of Games 2 SALE Ends Aug 5th 1.888.238.0444 Our NCCAP MEPAP 1 & 2 Begins Aug 6th - Make sure your Activity Staff is qualified before your next Survey ActivityDirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  5. Activity Directors have traditionally planned and understood the importance of continuing their resident’s religion within the facility. Often multiple religious activities are planned weekly in order to meet the needs of those they serve. Things they are changing, though. According to a study conducted by the PEW Research Center from 2012 to 2017, approximately 27% of U.S. adults identify as ‘Spiritual but Not Religious’, with 75% identifying as both. This may seem like a vague identification and it certainly leaves the Activity Director in uncharted waters when it comes to planning activities for it. First, we must understand what ‘Spiritual but Not Religious ’ means. It is defined as a life stance that does not believe that organized religion is the best or only path to personal spiritual development. In other words, spiritual people prefer a more customized approach, which can add another layer of complication while trying to plan for multiple people. The spiritual quest is ever evolving and the direction it goes in comes from the resident’s internal ques within. One week they may wish to work on past regrets, while the next week finds them guided towards meditation or mindfulness. Spirituality is not a one size fits all in the same way uniform religion is. For this reason, the Activity Director will need to stay in close communication with their residents and take their inspiration from their needs. In order to make your job a bit easier we have provided a list of suggested spiritual activities that may help guide you and your resident as you take on this noble quest. Spiritual Activity Starters Meditation and Yoga- There are numerous guided meditations available for purchase or free on YouTube. Jason Stephenson is a good place to start. Research a guided yoga program that suits your residents. There is such a thing as chair yoga, which might be ideal. Mindfulness- Practicing being in the present moment during daily activities. Create activities that keep the resident tuned into what they are doing. This would include activities that require concentration such as painting, crafting, puzzles, playing an instrument, or learning to do familiar things in a new way (i.e. writing an entire letter using their non-dominant hand). Slant these activities towards the spiritual side of things and make it known that the overall goal is to remain mindful and alert. Shadow Work- According to Lonerwolf (a respected site that specializes in soul work), "shadow work is the attempt to uncover everything that we have disowned and rejected within our Shadow Selves". These are all of the things we dislike about ourselves or were taught to dislike, perhaps even impulses that would be considered vile if carried out. This is deep work and Lonerwolf recommends that you attempt shadow work only after establishing a strong degree of self-love. Spirituality Book Club- Spiritualists love a good “self-help” book. There are so many fascinating books on the topic and many can be found directly through the publisher or on Amazon. Some of my favorite spiritual publishers and authors are Hay House, Sounds True, Eckhart Tolle, Michael Singer, Brene Brown and Wayne Dyer. A book by any of these authors is sure to generate much reflection and communication for the book club. Conscious Dancing- This basically involves free style dancing. Turn on some tunes and encourage your residents to move freely to the music. They may feel embarrassed to do this, as most of our lives are dictated by socially acceptable behavior, however you can make the difference in their comfort level by displaying your own. This could also be undertaken in smaller groups until participants feel more free and confident. Another option is to begin by having the resident remain seated, close their eyes and move their arms freely. Overtime you will have a room full of free birds! Chanting- Chanting is another one of those activities that can feel silly to do at first and this makes it a bit off putting to many. However, it is believed that as you are chanting something is slowly transforming within you. I would recommend beginning by having residents listen to a chanting video or audio on YouTube to warm to the idea of chanting themselves. Set the tone by dimming the lights and having residents close their eyes and focusing on the chant. Chants are generally in another language so make sure you select the right one for your residents and inform them of the translation. In Closing... These are just a few of the possible spiritual activities you could plan for. The most important thing is that you allow for flexibility and modifications to suit your residents. The ‘Spiritual but Not Religion ’ mindset is one of fluidity and honoring oneself. The very fact that you are attempting to modernize your program to encompass all belief systems is admirable and so beneficial. You can be certain that as spirituality gains broader acceptance and becomes more mainstream you will be called upon to adapt your calendar. Some of these practices will benefit many of your residents, spiritual or not, therefor beginning to incorporate these ideas now will surely serve you and your department now and in the very near future. Namaste (I bow to you). Resources: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/09/06/more-americans-now-say-theyre-spiritual-but-not-religious/ https://lonerwolf.com/shadow-work-demons/ https://www.spiritualawakeningprocess.com/2014/11/10-fun-spiritual-things-to-do.html Enroll Now NCCAP MEPAP 1&2 Starts Aug 6th - 16week Online Class required for NCCAP Certification. Instructor: Kathleen Hughes, ADC,EDU http://www.activitydirector.org At-Your-Own-Pace format available to Start Anytime - Take upto 1yr. Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  6. July is National Ice Cream Month!!!!!! Did You Know... ... some studies have shown that people buy and consume more ice cream on a Sunday than any other day of the week? Ice cream is an easy summer fundraiser that always draws a crowd of willing consumers. Now is the time to raise money for those items you are needing for your department. Take advantage of the hot days and Ice Cream Month by hosting a couple of events starring ice cream. Ice Cream Bar Fundraiser Ingredients: Ice Cream Strawberry/Pineapple/Chocolate/Caramel Ice Cream Topping Cherries, to top off the sundae with Nuts Whipping Cream, in can Cups Spoons Napkins Ice Cream Scoops Directions: Pick a day to hold this fundraiser that falls on or just after payday. Make up lots of flyers and post them around the facility, especially the break room and main entrances to your facility. Your target market should be staff, residents, volunteers and family members so consider where they me come into contact with your flyers. Note on the flyer what the sundae sales will be used for i.e. a good cause. Include all pertinent information about the event and what the charge will be per sundae. Ask residents to help you prepare and serve for this special fundraiser. Ice Cream Competition Have staff and family members make “Homemade Ice Cream” and bring it in on a weekend for this competition. Ask residents to participate by hosting a tasting and judging on their favorite flavor. Prior to the event create flyers and a newsletter write up. Ask individuals willing to make ice cream to sign up and also request participants RSVP so you have an idea of how much ice cream will be needed. NOTE: When I did this I found that family was not willing to make ice cream, however they were happy to donate money for the event. I then borrowed as many ice cream makers as I could find and made different flavors up in the Activity Department all week long and stored them in the freezer until the event. FYI, Coffee was our winner! Side Note: If you serve Banana Splits or coke floats at your Resident Council meetings, attendance will surely rise! The Scoop on Ice Cream Before milk based ice creams were introduced in 10th century, this summer treat was indeed made from ice. Industrial production of ice cream begun in 1851 in Boston, United States. The largest worldwide consumption of ice cream is in United States. There, one average person consumes 48 pints of ice cream per year. The most popular flavor of ice cream is vanilla. After it come chocolates, strawberry, cookies n’ cream, and others. Ice cream cones were invented during 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis, when large demand forced ice cream vendor to find help from nearby waffle vendors. Together they made history. One of the most unusual ice cream flavors is hot dog flavored ice-cream that was created in Arizona, US. Continental Europe was introduced with ice cream in late 13th century with Marko Polo returned to Italy with his tales of travel in China. Historians remember that Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) loved to eat snow flavored with nectar and honey. Hawaii is a home to an “ice cream bean”, fruit that tastes like vanilla ice cream. In United States, July is deemed to be "National Ice Cream Month". Most favorite ice cream topping is chocolate syrup. One cone of ice cream can be finished off in 50 licks. California is the larger producer of ice cream in United States. During 2003 they alone made 121 million gallons of this cold treat. It takes 12 gallons of milk to create one gallon of ice cream. Ice cream “Brain Freeze” effect is triggered when cold ice touches the roof of your mouth, which causes blood vessels in the head to dilate. End of the World War II was celebrated by eating ice cream. Source: http://www.icecreamhistory.net/ice-cream-facts/interesting-facts-about-ice-cream/ Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  7. I Am Bored: Brainstorming to Alleviate Resident Boredom by Kathleen Hughes, ADC There are lots of postings lately on the numerous Facebook pages for Activity Professionals about how the residents do not like their activities or that residents, families and other staff are bored with the activities offered. There are other comments about how residents ask for specific activities and then do not attend or ignore requests for preferences or suggestions. We also have “younger” residents looking for activities that they are interested in and do not want to be with the “older” residents. Perhaps we are asking the wrong questions and not empowering the residents to make their own calendar of events to encourage them to participate actively or to buy into the activity and have some stake in the game. The residents who actively participate in the planning and implementation of the activity would be more likely to attend and encourage others to attend. During a Brainstorming Workshop my coworkers and I learned a technique that allowed for the free flow of ideas and encouraged the participants to give ideas they may not have thought of. Using these techniques on a quarterly basis at the facility we created new activities, different activities and our activity calendar changed every single month. The only constant was the time of the programs, but the activity itself changed and always changed for the good. Brainstorming follows a specific path that you would need to use to be successful. First, you will need flip charts, markers and tape. These tools will assist with the flow of ideas and staff can help with the process so that they can be a part of it and see what the residents are thinking of. Appoint an Activities Committee as part of your Resident Council if you have one. If you do not have one, then invite all of the residents. Serve a snack and beverage and have them in a circle where they can see all that is being written down. Make sure that the people writing down the ideas write in large print so all can see. Each quarter you would ask the following questions (substitute the season for each question on a quarterly basis): What did you do as a kid in the summer? What did you do with your family in the summer? What is your fondest memory of a summer vacation? What is the best thing you ever did in the summer? Ask one question at a time and give the residents time to respond and reminisce. There are no “bad” answers as the point is to get as many ideas as possible. Do not discourage any of the ideas or thoughts. Write down everything that the residents say. Each idea builds on the other so having the ideas written on the flip chart paper will encourage them to expand upon other’s ideas. For example, we had residents discuss having a lemonade booth, going to the fair, swimming in the lakes, fishing, playing kick the can, making a tree house, renting a cottage on a lake, playing hopscotch, listening to music, sleeping in a tent in their backyard with the kids from the neighborhood, riding their bikes all through town, going to a drive in theater, learning how to hula hoop, clambakes, catching frogs, catching lighting bugs in a jar, campfires, cooking on an open fire, eating vegetables off the vine from their garden, spitting watermelon seeds and running through a sprinkler. We then took the 17 pieces of paper and hung them in the activities office so that we could all generate ideas. Then a week later we gathered a group of residents again and asked them which ideas we could use to plan activities for the summer. Please, remember we did this in April so that we could plan out the summer. We reconvened in August to plan for the Fall. Planning ahead is extremely important to the process. The group then looked over the memories and ideas and placed the activities on an extra-large calendar for the months of June, July and August. We went through all of the listed activities and some were accepted and some were placed on hold. The residents and the activities staff went through the planning process for each month. Keeping the activities we could not change such as religious services and Resident Council. The rest of our days and evenings were up for grabs. Each participant was given a copy of a completed calendar to take with them and asked to talk to other residents about what we had come up with and then get back to the activities staff if anyone had any other ideas. A week later we then had the entire summer schedule completed and ready to implement. Many of the ideas were incorporated into the calendar, including all of the above ideas. Our lemonade stand made $200 that summer and we had a campfire with our neighborhood fire department in our parking lot. We also had residents make the decorations for the events, they made invitations for residents and families, they would also make handouts and door prizes for those that attended and participated so that they could share memories about the programs. When the residents made the table decorations they were very proud of what they created and could not wait to learn who would win them when the event was over. Involving the residents in the brainstorming session and implementation of their ideas encourages creativity and enthusiasm. The staff also became more creative and tried new ideas for activities. The residents got used to the process and would talk among themselves for the upcoming season. Younger residents got to have some innovative activities and the older residents would attend just to see what was up! Give it a try, the key to the entire process is to look at the possibilities and do not have any negative interjections. Each thought, memory and idea should be considered and adapted for the residents. You can also acknowledge the residents that participated and helped plan the activities. Everyone has to be positive and encourage participation in the process. Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of Our Network. Proud Members Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  8. Senior Comedy Afternoon is an excellent Activity for any Senior Group.. Plan to attend and make a day of it.. 3 Course Meal, a Show .. all presented by Bonnie and her bunch of Misfits.. if you haven't experienced one of these "Afternoons" you're missing Out. the Event is in LA... near LAX ..the recently refurbished The Proud Bird Restaurant and Event Center (Tuskegee Room) Starts at Noon, Lunch at noon-thirty and the show is at 1:30.. and a guided tour of the Air Park can be enjoyed after the show. 3:15 July 14th, plenty of time to plan and reserve your buses.. dontmissthis Have Fun! Pennie
  9. An important topic of conversation amongst Activity Directors is the hesitancy of other departments within our facilities to help out with activities. At Activity Directors Network we are constantly getting inquiries about the rules regarding this sensitive and unique subject. For this reason, I thought it would be helpful to introduce you to the CMS Critical Pathways form which is designed to help you determine compliance. Critical Path Methodology has been around awhile. It has been used in every industry to help build processes and procedures using measurable statistics to determine the best route to achieve success and determine where and when failure occurs. This is why it is such a useful tool for Activity Directors to utilize. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have published documents related to the new State Survey process that went into effect 2017, and are being enforced as of 2018. The survey process combines the traditional survey and the QIS survey investigation methods. These new methods include Critical Element Pathways to help surveyors determine compliance, and you can use it to help your programs shine! Here is the link to the form: CMS-20065_ActivitiesCriticalPathways.pdf http://www.activitydirector.net/images/CMS-20065_ActivitiesCriticalPathways.pdf Use this form to determine if your facility activities are in compliance. Create a worksheet for your Activity Program that will help you to identify factors that may contribute to failure and/or deficiencies. It’s been my experience that facility procedures need to be updated and that the entire facility would benefit from better education in this area. It can be hard to bring this matter up to the other departments and creating tension from opposing viewpoints would only be counterproductive. This is how the form can help substantiate and legitimize your goal. Use the form to identify any potential deficiencies and then create an in-service to educate the staff. Presenting a well-researched plan to your Administrator and fellow department heads increases your potential for making a difference and solving any issues that have arisen out of an outdated approach. Hopefully, this form will help to bolster your confidence moving forward. Thanks for being a part of The Network, Pennie Bacon, Resource Director Activity Directors Network
  10. The Museum of Juggling History Main menu Home About David Cain – Juggling Shows For Seniors David Cain is a world champion and Guinness World Record holding juggler who has been performing professionally all over the world for over 35 years. He has appeared on television numerous times, including performing on NBC’s Today Show and on ABC’s The Gong Show. He now specializes in performing for senior adults. David presents a very entertaining show that includes juggling, indoor boomerangs, ball spinning, lasso spinning, balancing, Chinese yo-yo, plate spinning, comedy, and many other wonderful elements. David’s program is perfect for: Retirement Communities Nursing Homes Adult Daycare David is based in Middletown, Ohio, just north of Cincinnati, but is available to perform anywhere. Please feel free to contact David Cain at davidcainjuggler@hotmail.com or 513-658-1120 if you have any questions or to book a date to have him come to your library. http://historicaljugglingprops.com/david-cain-library-shows/
  11. California here they come... it's the craziness from SeniorComedyAfternoons.com Bonnie and her bunch have put together a Mothers Day Event like no other.. Mark your Calendars for May 13th 2018 . Get the Bus reserved and make your way to the Palos Verdes Golf Course Vista Ballroom for an afternoon of Funny! Here's a little Sample https://youtu.be/qz0W1HVWU18 Download this Flyer for the Details. Download this Flyer for a Pass Around Flyer to Share.
  12. Hello All, I just wanted to share two group activities that I've recently implemented at my facility and the residents love! The first is shuffleboard- it's a really simple set up with tape, makeshift pucks, and a Swiffer or two. It's great that it's a floor activity as you can gather a good size group for it. The activity allows for brain and physical fitness, friendly competition, and lots of laughs! The second is Jeopardy! It's a fun twist on your typical trivia game. I set up two groups of 5-6 for two teams. The residents loved picking out topics and winning points for it. The teams were even helping each other! There was laughter all around when playing this game, and of course a lot of brain fitness! Both of these activities can be found on pinterest too!
  13. Greetings all! My name is Paul Falkowski, no, not the marine biologist at Rutgers but the gerontologist in Omaha, Nebraska. So what I am doing posting here? I'm writing a book about the things that volunteers can do at the nursing home. If you're game I would like to interview you and talk about how you are using your volunteers, i.e., what are they doing? are they valuable to you? Do you think they could do more? I'm also looking for retired AD's that were working in nursing homes during the 60's and 70's. I'm hoping to end up with a complete picture of how volunteers have been used by the nursing home, how they are being used now, and how they might be used in the future. If you're interested or have questions, email me at paul@voluncheerleader.com Also if you want to read a little bit more about who I am, you can do that at: http://www.voluncheerleader.com I've been advocating for nursing homes for 25 years and as far as I'm concerned you are the real heroes of society! I really mean that! Look forward to hearing from you! Paul P. Falkowski, PhD Gerontologist
  14. Celebrate National Book Lovers Day on August 9th Enjoy a little Activity Director Humor with this cartoon Adventures of an Activity Director Book Lovers Day. Click to Download and Print your own Copy. A Simple Club Activity to enjoy with your readers! - ActivityDirector.com Materials : Books (large print, audio, and regular) Instructions : Have the club select a book for everyone to read and review. Have large print and audio available for those who need it. Designate a time to meet back and allow everyone to review the book and select another one. Note: Choosing books that are controversial or stir up debate are good options to create discussion and interest (i.e. The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown and The Red Tent by Anita Diamant). Visit www.booksarefun.com for a large book selection in large print. They will also schedule a Book Fair fund raising event for you to hold at your facility if you wish. August 7th, Google News Story . Adam Martin of CouncilChronicle.com had this to say... According to researchers, People who read live longer that people who do not read at all. So if you want to live longer, you should read more. Data from more than 3,500 participants was analysed. All the people were over the age of 50 and they were asked some questions about reading. The research team took into consideration many factors, such as gender, education level, income, and race. They then made three groups. One was for the people who did not read any books, the second for those who read almost three hours a week and the last one for those who read longer than that. What did the researchers find out? Well, it seems that those who read more were 17 percent less likely today in the next 12 years. - Download Print Share
  15. From the album: Adventures of an Activity Director

    Download, print and share a little Activity Director humor. Holly the AD in Adventures of an Activity Director by artist Bradley Sooter Holly's Book Club is invaded by technology

    © 2016 All Rights Reserved Activity Directors Network, llc

  16. Happy Memorial Day.. Enjoy a bit of humor from the Adventures in Activities.. artist Bradey Sooter Theme for the day is "Super Heroes" MemorialDay2016.pdf
  17. http://www.dandi-lines.com Watercolor patterns printed onto 100lb watercolor paper all ready for your residents to paint! Packs come with: 12 printed line drawings in either 9"x12" or 6"x9" Color photo of completed painting Directions (we find that most residents just want to paint there own design, but for those who want more info it is included) Watercolor techniques page We offer several different designs including seasonal and holiday product. We also have many simplified designs for those with site issues. New designs every month. These are wonderful to have on hand for those times when you need a quick project or a planned class has been canceled. http://www.dandi-lines.com/images/red_house_by_the_sea.jpg
  18. ADN now offers a Pre-MEPAP Course that is NCCAP pre-approved for 30 clock hours. This course along with the MEPAP1 and MEPAP2 allows individuals who are interested in becoming a Certified Activity Professional to become "Provisionally" certified through NCCAP. If you are thinking of changing careers and always wanted to serve the elderly this path created by ADN is the ticket. For additional information go to: http://www.activitydirector.org/classroom/ for additional information. Your activities career can start right here!
  19. Kevin Crombie is the founder and president of Atlantic City Poker Entertainment. After a brief pro baseball career, time in the banking industry, and later a stint in Atlantic City as a poker dealer, Kevin decided to form his own company. He combined his skills as a dealer with his natural gift as an entertainer (ballplayer) to provide a service to the members of Elder Care facilities. He doesn’t just deal cards, he teaches the game to the members with enthusiasm, patients and humor. After he concludes the first session, he is most often hired back on a regular basis. He often hears as he’s packing up, “When are you coming back?†The game played is the popular “Texas Hold’em†and it’s not only physical therapy, but exercise for the mind as well. Of course no gambling is involved, but the winner enjoys receiving the ACPE key chain at the end of play. After a lot of leg work he has grown his customer base to over 300 senior care facilities in the tri-state area. As he’s expanded, Kevin’s been very particular in hiring the right dealer/instructors, with the right personality that will be representing him and his company. Using the same successful formula, I’ve been assigned to grow the business in the South Florida market. As the baby boomers hit retirement age, there is tremendous growth potential in the Elder Care industry. The Activity Director has a demanding job keeping the activities schedule fresh and interesting for the members. Atlantic City Poker Entertainment fills that role. It’s a nice change from BINGO night, and the members will be asking for more! For more information & Florida bookings call Roy (561)352-3087 Check us out : http://www.acpokerentertainment.com
  20. Activity Director needed for a 72 bed assisted living facility in Augusta, GA. This facility includes a 14 bed memory care unit. Looking for a person to plan, implement and monitor recreation programs to meet the specific needs of each and all residents. Ensure residents' lives are maintained to the fullest extent possible by providing activities and contacts with the community. The candidate will need to have a good working knowlege of dementia and related illnesses, and posess the ability to plan and implement activities for this population as well as the rest of the facility residents. Call 706-910-6808 for more information.
  21. Opportunity: Responsible for planning, coordinating, and directing a full range of recreation coordination including MDS assessments, programs based on individualized needs, and participation in interdisciplinary staffing with required documentation; demonstrate accountability for the Recreation Program development, quality improvement, and problem solving with the department. Provides supervision and direction of the department and staff, recruit, orient, and supervise volunteers. Provides education programs in the community and assists Administrator in marketing efforts as requested. Required Skills: Bachelors of Science or Bachelors of Arts degree from an accredited college or university with a major in occupational or recreation therapy or a related therapy and is eligible for certification as a therapeutic recreation specialist or as an activites professional by a recognized accrediting body. Will consider a certified occupational therapist assistant with experience in a skilled nursing facility, along with the enhancement and development of a volunteer program. Two years experience working in the activity program (knowledge of music and art) at a long term care facility. Minimum of 4 years of supervisory experience. Working knowledge of Windows XP, Microsoft Outlook, E-Mail, Internet, Microsoft Word and Excel. Benefits: Health Insurance, Life Insurance, Dental Insurance, Disability Insurance, 401(k) To learn more about this excellent opportunity, please contact: Joan Bartmann Regional Recruiter MJ Care, Inc. 1-800-877-7018 Ext. 428 joanb@mjcare.com We also invite you to visit our website www.mjcare.com to learn more about our family and to complete our online application.
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