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Pennie

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  1. Here is an industrious undertaking.. UnityPoint Healthcare has provide a website with details for making a new modular mask, The Olson, named after 1930's legendary maker nurse Lyla Mae Olson. The Mask was quickly developed by clinicians from UnityPoint Health and is being shared across the globe in the fight against COVID19 St Lukes Hospitals are in short supply of masks. UnityPoint Health has provided downloadable patterns, YouTube Videos, and complete instructions on how to Sew, Package and Send completed Masks to the St. Lukes Hospitals. ---------------- https://www.unitypoint.org/cedarrapids/sewing-surgical-masks.aspx -------------- Completed Masks Enclose completed masks in a closed plastic bag or closed plastic box. We will launder them prior to use so no need to wash before delivering. Please deliver to the St. Luke's Foundation, 855 A Ave. NE, 1st floor, Cedar Rapids. Phone (319) 369-7716.
  2. Article reprinted with permission: QUARANTINE ACTIVITY GUIDE Posted on March 19, 2020 by ElderSong The COVID-19 coronavirus, which is sweeping across our nation, has certainly caused many of our usual activities and routines to cease. Our government is asking Americans to keep their distance and stay home in order to contain this devastating virus. For many of you, this means that your facility is on lock down. Family members may not be allowed to visit their loved ones. Your usual group activities may have had to halt for a time. Your members may be feeling anxious, worried, and unsure. In this time of uncertainty, we want to support you, the activity people. That's why we created this special edition activity guide to help support you and your group as our nation and world faces this pandemic. Below you'll find a list of one-on-one activities, as well as a few other non-traditional group activities to help you raise morale. Please adapt as needed. Let the other departments in your facility know your activity plans, and then follow your company's policies and procedures during this emergency. DAILY BOOST – There are so many good stories happening as a result of the COVID-19 global pandemic. Look for a positive story to share with members as you visit room to room. Share a video you find on social media, an inspiring quote, or a heart-warming story. Speaking of boosts, be sure to share (with permission) positive stories that are happening in your community. With many people turning to social media, it's a great time to flood newsfeeds with positive stories and reassure family members that their loved ones are doing well. GO LIVE – Many institutes, celebrities, and programs are taking their talents live on social media in order to boost morale all over the world. Join the going-live movement and interview members of your community. The senior population has lived through WWII and has a lot of wisdom to offer the younger population. With permission, invite members to go live with you. Advertise ahead of time so that your audience knows when to tune in. Then, select members to discuss various topics, such as how they survived WWII, parenting suggestions for multiple children, tried-and-true recipes that use common ingredients, or other advice to help Americans through this crisis. REMINISCING – Now is a great time to reminisce with members about WWII or the Korean War. Questions to prompt discussion include: Where were you during most of the war? Did you or any family members serve? Where were they stationed? What was everyday life like? How did you stay updated regarding war efforts? What do you remember eating? What was rationing like and how did your family handle rations? How did you guide your young children through the wartime? How did you hear that the war was over? Do you remember where you were, or what you were doing or wearing? How long did it take for life to get back to normal after the war? IN-ROOM BINGO – Keep the fun going by offering in-room Bingo, especially if your members can't gather for usual activities. Copy your regular Bingo cards so that participants can use a pen to mark their individual cards, reducing the risk of spreading germs. Ask members to sit near their doors while you walk down the hallway, calling out the numbers. Play with just one wing at a time, and schedule other Bingo games for other hallways, so that everyone has a chance to play. If your facility has an in-house TV channel, put the numbers on the screen and ask participants to tune in to the appropriate channel. HALLWAY SING-ALONGS – Boost morale with a hallway sing-along. Gather participants to their doors and play their favorite sing-along music. Encourage members to sing-along or just enjoy listening to the voices of their neighbors. ZIPLOCK CRAFTS – Sort through your craft supplies and create individual crafts that members can do in their rooms, or that you can do one-on-one with them. Include all the supplies needed, such as glue sticks, stickers, markers, etc. Be mindful of your participants and only give the kits to those who can follow instructions. Work one-on-one with those who need assistance. If you don't have a lot of supplies right now, copy adult coloring pages and encourage members to color in their room. CREATE A STAINED GLASS PANEL – Work one-on-one with members to create individual stained glass panels, then display them as a collective piece of artwork on your community's front windows to boost morale. You'll need contact paper, colored tissue paper in all sorts of colors, and black construction paper. Start by cutting a rectangular frame out of the construction paper, about 1/2 inch thick, as large as you want. Cut two pieces of contact paper the same size as your frame, but leave them whole (do not remove the center). With your participant, peel off one of the backings to the contact paper, laying it sticky side up on a table. Place the black frame on top of the sticky side. Then, tear small sections of the tissue paper and ask the participant to arrange it how they desire. Fill the entire panel. Peel the backing off the second piece of contact paper and carefully place it on top, sealing the panel together. Make two panels with each participant. Secure one panel in the window of the participant so they can enjoy it. Use the second panel to create your community stained glass window. TAKE A VIRTUAL RIDE – Walt Disney World may be closed, but that doesn't mean that participants can't enjoy a virtual ride. Head over to Romper.com for links to rides. Then, share one-on-one and take the time to reminisce about thrill rides, amusement parks, Disney World, fairs, and more. Ask about their first roller coaster or theme park: What was the name of the ride or park? Where was it? Do you prefer rides that spin or rides that offer bigger thrills? How much did a ticket to their the park cost? Is it still open? TRAVEL TO A MUSEUM – In addition to virtual rides, many museums across the world are offering virtual tours. During one-on-ones, ask participants about their favorite museum and visit, virtually, with them. Use a laptop or tablet to share images. Reminisce about their travels to the museum: Who did you go with? What did you like most about it? What memories does this virtual tour evoke? TUNE IN LIVE – As mentioned above, many celebrities, artists, institutes and more are sharing free, live programs that you can share one-on-one with participants. Search on social media for art classes, book clubs, concerts and more. Then, schedule one-on-one visits according to individual participant preferences. For example, if you have someone who loves art, bring a drawing pad and pencil with you and follow along to a live drawing class. Someone who prefers reading might appreciate being a part of a virtual book club. It might take a little effort on your part to coordinate schedules, but it will be worth the great boost to morale. IN-HOUSE FITNESS – Keep participants active by offering in-house fitness classes. If you have an in-house TV channel, record a fitness video that can be shared over the TV. If you don't, invite participants to join in from their doorways, in smaller groups. Sit in the center so they can hear and see you, and lead them in a condensed version of your usual fitness classes. Then, move down the hallway and repeat with the next group. Be mindful of blocking the hallway; stand if necessary, so that you can quickly move out of the way if there is an emergency. ADVERTISE WAYS OTHERS CAN HELP – Turn to social media to share ways the community can support and encourage your group. If your facility permits, accept handmade cards or pictures from children. Distribute to participants, or display them throughout the hallways. If members have access to a balcony, perhaps a musical family could give a private concert while keeping a safe distance. If your facility is near a neighborhood, encourage families to walk by and wave to your participants. A little note or gesture could go a long way to boost morale during this pandemic. UTILIZE VIDEO CALLS – If you aren't already doing this, be sure to offer video calls so that participants can stay connected with their families. Provide members' families with information on how to request a video chat with their loved one. If participants have a smart phone, teach them how to make a video call during your one-on-one visits. SET UP A WINDOW VISIT BOOTH – For families who live locally, set up a window visit booth so that members can visit in person. Designate a certain window on the first floor where families can drop by to visit. Ask members to use their cell phones, or use a regular phone, being sure to follow proper disinfection protocol between users. MINDFUL MEDITATIONS – Help participants combat anxiety and fear by leading them through mindful meditations during your one-on-one visits. Start by instructing the participant to find a comfortable position in a chair or bed and close his or her eyes. Then read a guided meditation from your favorite resource. Use a Bluetooth speaker to play soft, calming music in the background. Properly disinfect the speaker after each room visit. (Some people with hearing loss may hear the meditation better without the background music.) BRING THE OUTSIDE IN – If members cannot get outside due to strict quarantine guidelines, bring the outside in for them to enjoy. Here are a few ideas you can do during one-on-one visits. Plant a window sill herb garden. Grow grass in a plastic basket for Easter. Give each member a small houseplant to take care of during the quarantine. Place bird feeders near windows to attract wildlife. Watch nature DVDs with participants or take a virtual hike through a national park. As spring arrives, take pictures and share with members. GRATITUDE JOURNALS – Give participants a small journal and encourage them to take a moment each day to write one thing they are grateful for. Encourage them to think of different, unique experiences or moments from that particular day, instead of writing the same thing each day. AFTER-THE-QUARANTINE BUCKET LIST – Start a running list of what participants are most looking forward to once life returns to normal. Display the list in your activity room or common space and update it whenever someone has a new idea. Once the pandemic subsides, be sure to cross off items as participants engage in the activity. Use the list to guide your future activity planning. SUPPORTING THOSE WITH MEMORY LOSS – Individuals with memory loss may be most susceptible to feeling anxious and afraid during this global pandemic. They might not understand why their loved ones aren't visiting, or may not comprehend the scope and severity of the coronavirus. The best way to support those with memory loss is to try to maintain some sense of routine and normalcy with them. Lead smaller groups if permitted. Take them for short walks in a safe area. Keep them busy by asking them to fold towels, sort items, or organize cabinets. Limit their access to the daily news. Read short stories with them and ease their anxiety through humor. Sit down and enjoy a cup of tea or decaf coffee with them. Encourage them to rest in the afternoon. Be mindful of your own feelings and conversations with other employees. Members with memory loss may not understand the global pandemic, but they will pick up on anxiety in conversations. Ask employees working with memory loss members to be present and to save certain conversations for the break room. A QUOTE TO INSPIRE YOU "Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does." ~ William James "Quarantine Activity Guide" was written by Erin McCart. Copyright 2020 ElderSong Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprint Policy: To reprint or republish all or portions of this entry, you must acquire written permission and agree to link back to the original source. Please contact us at newsletter@eldersong.com to obtain permission. Visit ElderSong Disposable BINGO cards to help keep your facility safe. FREE BINGO Packs For the time being, we think it is best if you have all the help you can get free of charge. Please peruse our Member's Activity Database and take any inspiration you can from it to help you plan your days. Activity Database Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident's individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351 Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
  3. Hey All.. here is a unique way to get a scheduled Sing-A-Long activity on the calendar. Rob Crozier from Michigan, is a Sing-a-long entertainer in Senior care. He has put a demo of his program up on youtube. Schedule a Hallway Sing-A-Long for each afternoon at 3: I love it, Let me know what you think and contact Rob for more info on his program. We need a few days of song.. He seems like a hard working creative guy, Activity Director material... thanks Pennie ROB CROZIER ( ROBCROZIER123@GMAIL.COM ) Website - Youtube Channel Hello, I am an Ann Arbor, MI music professional with a specialty in sing a longs and senior entertainment. As you may know, musician gigs are all cancelled in Michigan. I was wondering if it would be possible to share the work that I'm doing with your community? I'm offering a full sing a long program for one month with unlimited use for $100 per facility. The video is ready as a Youtube link that can easily be played back like this demo: https://youtu.be/ZC4TiSqzxYg As you may know all "Outside Entertainers" have been cancelled and as Senior Home Musicians we are trying to get creative. I’m worked out a new platform of "Online Entertainers" a Sing-A-Long YouTube Presentation video for a month’s use, perfect for scheduled activities several times throughout the month , great way to economize). You get to use it for a full month for $100. Are you interested in my Sing a Long youtube link? Let me know if you can put this to use. These videos take about 8 hours to record, edit, mix and upload. Just so you know that I’ve put some thought and hard work into this product. Feel free to send any feedback, or if you are running into hardship, you can pay whatever is affordable. Here is a demo: https://youtu.be/ZC4TiSqzxYg All the best, Rob Website - Youtube Channel
  4. Movie News .. New Release Movies will change to "Video On Demand Programming" to help with Social Distancing. Universal - The Hunt, Ema and The Invisible Man Goto "On Demand" on Friday. Check your cable or satellite for days and prices. Trolls World Tour , still pending for working moms with kids home... https://news.google.com/articles/CAIiEB1HnokAxrRfqYh8Sct994IqFggEKg0IACoGCAowoPUEMKAjMP6Y1gU?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US%3Aen
  5. HIPAA for Activity Directors written by Celeste Chase Activities professionals deal with resident information on a personal level, including but not limited to: family issues, special requests from the resident, newsletter articles, etc. Without a doubt, there is a great deal of detailed personal information that must be monitored to prevent unintended disclosure. The following information will hopefully ease your mind about HIPAA regulations. That way, you will be able to have your calendars, banners, bulletin boards and posters, while being in full compliance with all of the regulations. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), Public Law 104-191, was enacted on August 21, 1996. It details standards for the electronic exchange, privacy and security of health information. These guidelines were initially designed to regulate "individually identifiable" - health information that was transmitted electronically. Since then, the "Privacy Rule" that is defined by HIPAA has expanded that concept. Covered Entities "must" be HIPAA Compliant HIPAA, or Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act of 1996, covers both individuals and organizations. Those who must comply with HIPAA are often called HIPAA-covered entities. This information will focused on Health Care Providers known as nursing homes - specifically health care professionals in the role as Activity Directors. Some of these entities are: Health care providers such as nursing homes, rehab facilities, hospitals or any other facility providing skilled or intensive care. Other entities also included are: Health Plans, Health Care Clearinghouses, and Business associates. Not sure if you are working in a Covered Entity; download this PDF for more details check the following resources. Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Administrative-Simplification/HIPAA-ACA/Downloads/CoveredEntitiesChart20160617.pdf Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Administrative-Simplification/HIPAA-ACA/AreYouaCoveredEntity Personal Health Information (PHI) The specific information targeted under the HIPAA regulations is data known as: "Personal Health Information" or PHI. This would be any data that provides "Individually identifiable health information" - including demographic data. PHI information may be received or created by a facility. It may contain past, present or future health diagnosis, history and/or treatment and is inclusive of payment information for medical services normally found in medical charts and billing files. Portions of such personal information may often be found on bulletin boards, photos, calendars, birthday cards, activity rooms, common areas and activity progress notes. The Nuts and Bolts for Directors There are several ways to keep your department and resident's privacy intact and remain in compliance with HIPAA regulations. Staff orientation must include appropriate training in this area across all interdisciplinary team members. When is PHI distribution approved under HIPAA? There are different allowable ways to exchange medical information. Generally, the facility may provide select PHI details to family members, friends and clergy. The resident's name and room number. The general condition of the resident: - Having a good day today. - Asked to attend sing-a-long group. - Has been a little sad today. The residents' religious affiliation. Note: Be sure to check if your residents have authorized a legal "Health Care Proxy". This appointed person or persons can stipulate the dissemination of any health information or may over-ride permissions as to whom this personal information may be given. That said, the following are scenarios in which you are not allowed to disclose medical information in any circumstances: Never walk away from your computer, laptop or other electronic health record device without shutting down or entering sleep command to close your screen. It is never permissible to momentarily walk away to tend to another matter while leaving personal information visible on your screen. Never carry on conversations in areas lacking privacy within the facility between staff members. There will never be any circumstance when you should discuss or comment about your resident's day within open areas in which the conversation might be accidently overheard; such areas could be hallways, bathrooms, etc. REMEMBER: "THE WALLS HAVE EARS" Any inbound or outbound resident health information whether fax, email, completed forms, and standard mail. Any document must be immediately addressed upon receipt. Under no circumstances should any health information be allowed to remain in waiting within view on your desk, fax machine or open file organizer until you can tend to it. Activity Plans, Bulletin Boards and Other Publications Photographs/Pictures: Ensure that a permission form has been signed by the authorized individual and is filed in the resident's chart. This permission form is mandatory if you plan to take resident pictures. However, once you include the resident's name with that picture, you will be in violation of HIPAA. If you need to use a name (on a bulletin board for example) all you really need to do is ask the resident for permission and document that permission was given. Calendars and Birthday Cards: Simply remove the birth year from any information. You may only provide the residents name, month and day of birth within the given month. For example: Happy Birthday to Teddy – (3/21). It goes without saying that you should never include medical information (diagnoses, dementia items, etc.) on your monthly calendars. Bulletin Boards and Miscellaneous: Documented permissions are worth their weight in gold. In almost every case if you take the proper steps to ask permission, you can prevent any confusion and facility privacy citation during survey. Never add names to pictures. If you absolutely must, be sure to get explicit permission and again document that it was given. However, I would suggest you to steer clear of adding names period to prevent possible confusion. Activity Rooms and Common Areas: Can pictures of residents be used in your common areas? Yes, but once more, be sure that no medical information accompanies those pictures. Additionally, never identify residents by room or unit, especially if that resident resides on a memory/dementia care unit. This information is simply not needed to convey the resident experience through pictures. Activity and Progress Notes: As previously stated, completed resident forms should never lie in waiting, inclusive of all progress notes. These forms must be put away in the individual chart to prevent unwanted viewing of resident privacy information. Never leave it out in the open on your desk to attend to another matter. The only exception would be when you are able to secure (lock) the document in an office. Shreddables Pure and Simple...you bear the responsibility of ensuring that no "unauthorized" eyes are able to view resident health information. This also applies to any documentation that is no longer required for record retention. "Record retention guidelines" outline how long resident & treatment records must be retained. Records deemed to expire must be permanently disposed of by way of shredding. Always check with your facility Administrator to ensure your understanding of how and when shredding services are utilized by your facility. The major goal of the Privacy Rule is to assure that individuals' health information is properly protected while allowing the flow of health information needed to provide and promote high quality health care and to protect the public's health and well being. Source: https://managemypractice.com/cms-releases-record-retention-guidelines/?print=print Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/CMSRecordsSchedule For more detailed HIPAA information: https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/privacy/laws-regulations/index.html https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/training/index.html Written By Celeste Chase Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved.
  6. HIPAA for Activity Directors Activities professionals deal with resident information on a personal level, including but not limited to: family issues, special requests from the resident, newsletter articles, etc. Without a doubt, there is a great deal of detailed personal information that must be monitored to prevent unintended disclosure. The following information will hopefully ease your mind about HIPAA regulations. That way, you will be able to have your calendars, banners, bulletin boards and posters, while being in full compliance with all of the regulations. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), Public Law 104-191, was enacted on August 21, 1996. It details standards for the electronic exchange, privacy and security of health information. These guidelines were initially designed to regulate "individually identifiable" - health information that was transmitted electronically. Since then, the "Privacy Rule" that is defined by HIPAA has expanded that concept. Covered Entities "must" be HIPAA Compliant HIPAA, or Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act of 1996, covers both individuals and organizations. Those who must comply with HIPAA are often called HIPAA-covered entities. This information will focused on Health Care Providers known as nursing homes - specifically health care professionals in the role as Activity Directors. Some of these entities are: Health care providers such as nursing homes, rehab facilities, hospitals or any other facility providing skilled or intensive care. Other entities also included are: Health Plans, Health Care Clearinghouses, and Business associates. Not sure if you are working in a Covered Entity; download this PDF for more details check the following resources. Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Administrative-Simplification/HIPAA-ACA/Downloads/CoveredEntitiesChart20160617.pdf Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Administrative-Simplification/HIPAA-ACA/AreYouaCoveredEntity Personal Health Information (PHI) The specific information targeted under the HIPAA regulations is data known as: "Personal Health Information" or PHI. This would be any data that provides "Individually identifiable health information" - including demographic data. PHI information may be received or created by a facility. It may contain past, present or future health diagnosis, history and/or treatment and is inclusive of payment information for medical services normally found in medical charts and billing files. Portions of such personal information may often be found on bulletin boards, photos, calendars, birthday cards, activity rooms, common areas and activity progress notes. The Nuts and Bolts for Directors There are several ways to keep your department and resident's privacy intact and remain in compliance with HIPAA regulations. Staff orientation must include appropriate training in this area across all interdisciplinary team members. When is PHI distribution approved under HIPAA? There are different allowable ways to exchange medical information. Generally, the facility may provide select PHI details to family members, friends and clergy. The resident's name and room number. The general condition of the resident: - Having a good day today. - Asked to attend sing-a-long group. - Has been a little sad today. The residents' religious affiliation. Note: Be sure to check if your residents have authorized a legal "Health Care Proxy". This appointed person or persons can stipulate the dissemination of any health information or may over-ride permissions as to whom this personal information may be given. That said, the following are scenarios in which you are not allowed to disclose medical information in any circumstances: Never walk away from your computer, laptop or other electronic health record device without shutting down or entering sleep command to close your screen. It is never permissible to momentarily walk away to tend to another matter while leaving personal information visible on your screen. Never carry on conversations in areas lacking privacy within the facility between staff members. There will never be any circumstance when you should discuss or comment about your resident's day within open areas in which the conversation might be accidently overheard; such areas could be hallways, bathrooms, etc. REMEMBER: "THE WALLS HAVE EARS" Any inbound or outbound resident health information whether fax, email, completed forms, and standard mail. Any document must be immediately addressed upon receipt. Under no circumstances should any health information be allowed to remain in waiting within view on your desk, fax machine or open file organizer until you can tend to it. Activity Plans, Bulletin Boards and Other Publications Photographs/Pictures: Ensure that a permission form has been signed by the authorized individual and is filed in the resident's chart. This permission form is mandatory if you plan to take resident pictures. However, once you include the resident's name with that picture, you will be in violation of HIPAA. If you need to use a name (on a bulletin board for example) all you really need to do is ask the resident for permission and document that permission was given. Calendars and Birthday Cards: Simply remove the birth year from any information. You may only provide the residents name, month and day of birth within the given month. For example: Happy Birthday to Teddy – (3/21). It goes without saying that you should never include medical information (diagnoses, dementia items, etc.) on your monthly calendars. Bulletin Boards and Miscellaneous: Documented permissions are worth their weight in gold. In almost every case if you take the proper steps to ask permission, you can prevent any confusion and facility privacy citation during survey. Never add names to pictures. If you absolutely must, be sure to get explicit permission and again document that it was given. However, I would suggest you to steer clear of adding names period to prevent possible confusion. Activity Rooms and Common Areas: Can pictures of residents be used in your common areas? Yes, but once more, be sure that no medical information accompanies those pictures. Additionally, never identify residents by room or unit, especially if that resident resides on a memory/dementia care unit. This information is simply not needed to convey the resident experience through pictures. Activity and Progress Notes: As previously stated, completed resident forms should never lie in waiting, inclusive of all progress notes. These forms must be put away in the individual chart to prevent unwanted viewing of resident privacy information. Never leave it out in the open on your desk to attend to another matter. The only exception would be when you are able to secure (lock) the document in an office. Shreddables Pure and Simple...you bear the responsibility of ensuring that no "unauthorized" eyes are able to view resident health information. This also applies to any documentation that is no longer required for record retention. "Record retention guidelines" outline how long resident & treatment records must be retained. Records deemed to expire must be permanently disposed of by way of shredding. Always check with your facility Administrator to ensure your understanding of how and when shredding services are utilized by your facility. The major goal of the Privacy Rule is to assure that individuals' health information is properly protected while allowing the flow of health information needed to provide and promote high quality health care and to protect the public's health and well being. Source: https://managemypractice.com/cms-releases-record-retention-guidelines/?print=print Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/CMSRecordsSchedule For more detailed HIPAA information: https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/privacy/laws-regulations/index.html https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/training/index.html Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident's individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  7. Hi Everyone!! Or, As the Irish in Ireland say "Dia Dhuit! (May God Be With You!) Well I trust you all had a lovely weekend, what with Valentine's Day and Presidents Day.. !! Chocolates, flowers, dinner out.... clothes, furniture, sales, it's all good! Time spent with loved ones or shopping.. it's the American way! So, the clock is ticking! This past Sunday makes it one month away from our Big Irish Extravaganza! and yes, I finally got my green outfit! Not an easy feat.. green is not exactly the most popular color I find.. and i have been searching for weeks!! It helps me to get in the mood and excited for putting on our shows... So I'm excited now!! Are you getting excited yet? To wear your green, to laugh, to sing, to celebrate a Holiday that brings the spirit of a country and a culture to life?.. I am! There are many reasons to associate green with Ireland and by extension with its Saint Patricks Day games and traditions. Green is one of the colors in Ireland's tri-color flag. It is also the color most typically associated with the classic Irish symbol, the shamrock, and of course Ireland herself is frequently referred to by her nickname, the "Emerald Isle." And did you know that Ireland is the home of the Limerick. It's said that Limericks were invented in the 18th century by an Irish brigade when they were returning from France. They sang a song with a chorus about Limerick, an Irish port city. Impromptu verses were added. Each verse was about adventures of people from other Irish towns. The verses had to be invented on the spur of the moment, each line by a different singer. After each verse the whole group sang the chorus, "will you come back to Limerick?".. so began Limericks! Who knew!!?? Here's two for you when you're having a cocktail to remember! .. An Irishman name of Pat Sweeney, In Nice drank a quart of Martini. The local gendarme, Wired his wife in alarm, "Nous regrettons Pat Sweeney est fini." . Some merry old monks of Manulla, Found life was becoming much dulla. So they brewed a fine ale, in a massive big pail, And they and their lives were much fulla. Nevertheless,.. ticket sales are percolating so get yours now while they're hot! And remember, we're not just comedy, we've got our Irish dancers, musicians, and we love celebrating birthdays so come celebrate your lives with us! And that's no blarney! Hope I've made you laugh and think this week! Have yourself a grand one! Always, or Mise Le Meas! (Sincerely in Gaelic) I Live to Laugh! Bonnie Barchichat Executive Producer Senior Comedy Afternoons.com GO HERE FOR TICKETS! 714-914.2565 Or CALL! P.S. Please share this email with friends who can use some more fun, laughter and sociability in their life. P.P.S. Sponsors.. If you're Senior Friendly and want to meet our Audience here's your opportunity! Drop me a line and say "tell me more!" www.Here's the Proud Bird! Don't forget to email me what you'd like to have for lunch! All orders must be in by March 9th! ©2020 Senior Comedy Afternoons LLC. | 2313 Nelson Avenue, Redondo Beach, Ca. 90278
  8. Hi.. Don Weitz wrote to the Activity Directors Network sometime last week asking to share his Contact Info with Activity Directors in the Dallas Fort Worth for -- Facility Entertainer - Pianist - Available -- . If you have ever been to the Highland Park Cafeteria , than you've probably enjoyed his music, he plays there 2-3 times a week. Please visit the Cafeteria, it is Amazing made better by Don's accompaniment .. https://highlandparkcafeteria.com/ Plan an Outing... seriously... If you would like Don at your facility, send him an email .. Go ahead and call around for recommendations, he was at the The Legacy at Willow Bend Memory Care, Independent Living and Rehab, The Reserve, Sunrise on Hillcrest, Briarview, and the Jewish Community Center of Dallas over the last couple of months.... here is his bio , in his own words.. "I am a pianist and I entertain at several retirement communities in the Dallas / Plano / Richardson areas, though I would be happy to expand beyond those cities. Over the past few months, I have played at Edgemere, The Legacy at Willow Bend Memory Care, Independent Living and Rehab, The Reserve, Sunrise on Hillcrest, Briarview, and for seniors at the Jewish Community Center of Dallas. Playing for Memory Care is especially uplifting as residents often start singing along with songs they knew 50+ years ago. I am a regular pianist at Highland Park Cafeteria and entertain there 12-15 times a month. My repertoire consists mainly of popular music from the 1960s. My clients like that this appeals to residents and diners 65+ years old. Folks were in their teens and 20s during the 1960s and often comment, "Thanks for the memories, I haven't heard that song since I was in high school!" I recently performed a promoted “1960s Night” at Highland Park Cafeteria. I play by ear, and can easily customize my music list to include hits of the 1950s and earlier, as well as songs from the 70s and later. I establish rapport with the residents by telling the names of the songs and if I know a bit of trivia, sharing that as well, such as when originally recorded and by whom. Other than your piano, I require no additional equipment. I’ll be glad to come by and play a tune or two on the piano and discuss how I may be of service. Please contact Don Weitz at donsweitz@gmail.com. “Wouldn’t it be Nice” to have a special oldies performance!"
  9. Theories of Aging People have always been obsessed with aging. Whether it’s to prolong life, make sense of disease or disability, to extract wisdom or to add meaning into the process, aging is generally at the forefront of all cultures throughout time. A look back into history show all kinds of rituals based on again and potions to grant eternal life abound. Still today you can find thousands of anti-aging products for the skin, brain, mind, and/or body in general. One of the most valuable reasons we should research Theories of Aging is so that we can understand what is happening emotionally and psychologically for the resident so that we can help introduce a better quality of life in a more empathetic manner. As we cover some of the theories put forth, consider of some of your own theories that you have gathered throughout your career and life experiences. Once we connect al the dots it will make it easier for you to relate to your residents and plan on their behalf. Biological Theories of Aging Biological Theories of Aging focus on the aging process of the human organism itself. It was long believed that the body experiences a dramatic loss of cognitive and physical abilities were pretty much inevitable. However, research and studies have largely disproved this. In fact, many individuals lose very little ability. This is incredibly comforting to me as I am sure it is to you and your residents. Belief is a strong factor in quality of life. If a resident believe they will hit a certain age and begin to breakdown it could lend energy to that manifestation unnecessarily. There are 3 primary biological theories of aging: The Nutrition Theory on Aging This is one of the oldest theories, however its level of obvious intelligence has increased as our knowledge of the importance of nutrition has increased as a society. This involves acquiring an adequate amount of vitamins and minerals across a variety of sources to maintain health. The correlation between eating healthy and prolonging life while deterring disease and disability has been documented for thousands of years, and is now backed by extensive science. It is known that many disease thought to be age related are in fact nutrition related and may be minimized or even prevented all together with correct nutritional intake. Teacher’s Tip: Knowledge is power. Explore topics of nutrition and health with your residents so that they may be empowered to take action. At the very least this information can provide hope which goes a long way in all situations. Try and provide healthy snacks for your residents and create activities that focus on health. Food and its corresponding effect on aging may be common sense to our generation, however, it wasn’t so common in the last couple of generations. This may be a hurdle you will have to navigate and education is the best tool in your arsenal. Pinterest has many pins featuring elderly individual’s tackling marathons, weight lifting and all kinds of other endeavors that may seem impossible without direct proof. Offer that proof and get your residents motivated. Activity Idea: Host a marathon at your facility. Start with a 5k and see how things go. Eventually you could make it a long marathon or add in different events, obstacles, or themes to mix it up. Invite staff and family members to join you and your residents. You could even utilize this as a fundraising event and raise money to buy exercise equipment for your residents. Residents that cannot participate could be involved by setting up and running a water stand, making healthy snacks for after the race, creating signs of encouragement and taking photos for the local newspaper and/or your newsletter. The Environmental Theory on Aging This theory deals directly with the physical environment around the individual. Air quality, population, isolation, location and/or relocation, viruses, smoking, travel, social/cultural stress, etc falls under this theory as factors that affect aging. Listed within this category is the effects of being moved out of one’s own home and into a nursing facility. As you can imagine, this is a tough pill to swallow, so to speak. Teacher’s Tip: One of the primary negative feelings associated with moving into a nursing facility is the sense of losing purpose in life and being a burden. There are ways that we may be able to help counter react these types of feelings. Perhaps you could organize a welcome committee that meets with new residents and allows for a discussion on this topic and others that are relevant. This will help the new resident to realize they are not along and their feelings are completely normal. It will also help them to see that other residents have experienced and successfully moved through these feelings into a life that does hold new meaning. It may also be a good idea to create ‘resident jobs’ and encourage new residents to sign up for different tasks or to create new tasks based on their individual backgrounds. The Genetic Factors Theory on Aging This theory deals directly in DNA and states that genetics will determine how one lives and for how long. However, a new area of study called epigenetics states that genetics is really only responsible for a small amount of gene mutations and in fact the individual is the key component as to whether a disease will develop or not. Previously, we believed we were prisoners to our genetics and we were going to develop what we were going to develop, regardless of our own actions. Epigenetics says that our genetics predispose us to certain diseases, but we determine whether the switch gets flipped to on or off with our physical, emotional and mental habits/choices. Again, this is empowering and relieving information to pass along. Teacher’s Tip: This theory lends itself to the category of preventive medicine in my mind. Utilizing the health history of your resident and their family members you can see what they may be predisposed to should the switch get flipped on. This means you could research preventative measures against a specific disease and help your resident to get on a routine that is designed specifically for their DNA. This is by no means a scientific plan or theory on my part. It is simply an educated leap as to how this information may be applied beneficially. In Conclusion... Biological factors are a huge component to the aging process and failing health is certainly prohibitive to leading a fulfilling life. The huge takeaway here is that many of these factors are under our control to a point. Through understanding the processes we can develop plans of action to counter react or prevent that which is preventable. Knowledge is power and can be highly motivating. I suggest you gather your interested residents and discuss these varied biological factors and get their feedback. Discuss other contributing biological factors that may not have been recognized. Empower your residents to take this information and turn it into personal strength and accountability. Tune in Next Week as we continue our discussion with the Psychological Theories of Aging.
  10. For Your Stomach Irish Cheese and Bacon Popcorn Source: https://www.chocolatemoosey.com/2014/01/07/irish-cheese-and-bacon-popcorn/ Yield: 6-8 This popcorn is best eaten the day it is made, so if you are making this for a party, grate the cheese ahead of time then toss together at the last minute. Ingredients 7 cups salted popcorn (roughly 1/3 cup unpopped kernels) 1/4 cup butter, melted 1/4 cup crumbled bacon 1 cup finely grated Irish cheese Instructions In a large bowl, toss together the popcorn, butter, bacon, and cheese. Popcorn is best eaten the day it's made. For Your Fun Shamrock Mason Jars Source: https://masonjarcraftslove.com/shamrock-mason-jars-2/ Materials Pint Size Regular Mouth Mason Jars Quart Size Regular Mouth Mason Jars Gold Metallic Spray Paint Green Acrylic Paint Toothpicks Medium Tip Paint Brush Instructions Spray paint jars gold and allow to dry. Use paint brush to create 3 small green dots in a clover pattern. Create a stem by dragging a toothbrush down at the bottom of the dot formation. Place varied shamrocks all over your jar to suit your taste. For Your Brain 1. Saint Patrick was the patron saint and national apostle of Ireland who is credited with bringing_____________ to Ireland. a. beer b. Christianity c. snakes d. clovers 2. Saint Patrick is most known for driving the snakes from Ireland. Snakes more likely represent: a. criminals b. snakes c. pagan religions d. leprechauns 3. The story goes that Saint Patrick converted the Druid warrior chiefs and princes by baptizing them and thousands of their subjects in a spring that still bears the same name of: a. Holy Wells b. Lochness Springs c. Emerald Waters d. Golden Hole 4. Saint Patrick's Day is a traditional day for spiritual renewal and offering prayers for missionaries worldwide. T or F 5. Today, many Catholic places of worship all around the world are named after Saint Patrick, including cathedrals in California and Dublin City. T or F Answers: 1. b. Christianity, 2. c. pagan religions, 3.a. Holy Wells, 4. True, 5. False. Saint Patrick’s Cathedrals are in New York and Dublin City. For Your Smile For Your Wallet BUY NOW! ENROLL NOW! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351 Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
  11. Hi. Here is one you can download as a sample , It will give you an idea of what to plan and how to display it. hope this helps, Thanks Pennie
  12. MultiDepartmentalForm.pdf View File File imported by an administrator Submitter Pennie Submitted 12/05/2011 Category Newsletters, Calendars, Forms, Puzzles, PrintOuts, FunFacts  
  13. Try not to over think it.. I had a couple of changes that always saved me, One was, I talked my admin into paying me to create my calendars and newsletters at home on my computer. He approved 6hrs a month on my check and that helped. Second was , when I created my activities calendar, I printed one extra for each resident, On the extra copy I would put a blank so that I could put a residents name and room number on the copy. In your case I would end up with 89 resident calendars in a folder, stapled together, that would go to each activity. Each resident in attendance would have their calendar activity highlighted to show attendance, non attendance due to vistor, participation level Red Green Yellow highlighters add a Blue and make your own color legend. Its a fast way to document who was in attendance, include notes. At the end of the month you have your attendance records and data for your careplan and progress notes. Each calendar for each resident in the folder will reflect the entire months attendance with notes, most can be documented with a quick swipe of the marker Here's a sample 3200.docx hope this helps Pennie We create a monthly calendar and newsletter available for download each month. Its a Membership, 9.95 month. http://activitycompanion.com You can use Printmaster or OnlyOffice free online to load our templates and edit to fit your facility.
  14. Are you currently a CNA? We have many students converting from the nursing department to the activity department. It is an easy transition for most as they are already familiar with the facility, residents and daily schedule. We hear many reasons for the change of position when talking with our students. Among the listed reasons: Job Burnout Want More Involvement with Residents Better Work Schedule Have a More Creative Calling This is in no way an exhaustive list. However, it sheds some light on the thought process. Perhaps you are a CNA and have been feeling the need to make some changes for similar reasons. According to our MEPAP instructor, Kathy Hughes: NCCAP has rewritten the Certification requirements over the last year to make the transition easier. A new Track 4 was introduced to allow the NCCAP applicant to apply additional work experience in place of college credits, and requiring only a high school diploma or equivalent to apply for Certification. Here are the requirements for specific to experience in the NCCAP Standards: Applicable Work Experience A. Activity Professionals Certification i. 50% of work experience must be directly working with activity programming and documentation ii. 50% can be indirectly working with activities, ie Restorative, CNA, Dietary Aide, Rehab., etc. iii. 30% of this experience can be volunteer work with individuals across the continuum of care. NOTE: NCCAP will require an official letter from the facility typed on letterhead stating the hours accumulated. ENROLL NOW! Download the Enrollment Packet for the MEPAP 1 Course for complete details. MEPAPEnrollPack.pdf BUY NOW! ENROLL NOW! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved.
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