Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'activity director'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Product Groups

  • Activity Director Forms
  • Activity Director Books
  • Social Service Books
  • Just for Seniors
    • Senior Books
    • Arts and Crafts
    • Senior Games
    • Memory Puzzles
    • Large JigSaw Puzzles
    • Group Games
    • Special Needs
  • Entertainment Activities
    • Comedy DVD's
    • ArmChair Travels
    • Ideas in Music
    • SingAlongs & Gospel
  • Activity Printables

Forums

  • WELCOME
    • Message Board News!
    • Open Discussion
    • Introduce Yourself
    • Activity Jobs Lisiting
    • Facility Entertainers
  • Activity Forum - Specific Topics
    • Sharing Activities
    • Activity Charting and Forms
    • Policies and Procedures
    • Certification and CEU's
    • Jobs Description and Wage Compare
    • Open Discussion - Alzheimers
    • Adult Day Care
  • Care Planning
    • Care Plans

Categories

  • Newsletters, Calendars, Forms, Puzzles, PrintOuts, FunFacts
  • Activity Director Documentation & Regulation Forms

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype

  1. Hello! I am Mike Smolka. I am the Owner of Photo Finish Racing, the board game... The BIIIG board game! I make contact with you on the referral from Rhonda Cap, the Activities Director at Leisure World AZ, here in Mesa. We have arranged to schedule a Kentucky Derby style event here and Photo Finish Racing will be the center piece of this activity. Quite by happenstance, I was able to introduce the game in person to Rhonda and her assistant, Jamie, and they agreed that this game would be a terrific fit among other community activities they offer. They suggested I reach out to a larger audience... and here we are! My father invented the game originally over 70 years ago, but we just recently have finally brought it to market.... VERY FEW people have ever heard of us... until now.... We feature a HUGE playing surface and the simple but effective rules promote ENGAGEMENT among everyone present... Please see (ME! in our short tutorial video) at PhotoFinishRacing.com under the Rules tab. Easy to Learn, Easy to Play, and COMPLETELY ENGAGING THROUGHOUT! What questions might this extended community have for me? Thank you again, Mike "Smoke" Smolka Owner/President Photo Finish Racing... and Proud Sponsor of the PDJF -Permanently Disabled Jockey's Fund
  2. View this email in your browser Wandering Residents In residential aged care facilities there are many factors that may influence residents to wander. These commonly include: Inactivity/boredom – lack of activity may lead the person to wander around looking for something to do. In some instances wandering dissipates loneliness and the behavior in and of itself, is often a substitute for lack of social interaction. In contradiction, wandering surprisingly may also be a response to overstimulation and overwhelming situations. Fear, agitation, and confusion commonly lead to “dementia” wandering outdoors or in public environments. Some emotional cues that can cause wandering include: increased levels of stress or fear. Residents with “dementia” who wander are moving about in ways that may appear aimless but often have purpose. People may wander in response to an unmet basic need like human contact, hunger, or thirst; a noisy or confusing environment; or because they are experiencing some type of distress, like pain or the need to use the toilet. Wandering can be helpful or dangerous, depending on the situation. The Balancing Act It’s a balancing act for sure but it is important to look beyond the words or behaviors to discover the feelings that the resident might earnestly be trying to express. Strong emotions may also be caused by unmet needs. Staff must implement the process of deduction to work out what needs are not being addressed and meet the resident “where they are” when possible. Residents may wander for any number of reasons: Physical needs Psychological and social needs Cognitive needs Non-goal-directed wandering requires a response in a manner that addresses both safety issues and an evaluation to identify root causes to the degree possible. Moving about the facility aimlessly may indicate that the resident is frustrated, anxious, bored, hungry, or depressed. Although people who wander may gain social contact, exercise, and stimulation, the resident may consequently become lost or exhausted. Hence, they may become overwhelmed and over tired, which predictably causes sudden outwardly hasty behaviors such as wandering or higher probability of injuries to self and/or others. Person-Centered Care for Wandering Behavior Simply stated, some basic principles for people with dementia stems from understanding and supporting the residents’ rights. To be sure, the onset of dementia does not preclude inherently due personal rights. Understand that the individual beyond the “dementia” is becoming increasingly hidden rather than lost. This means that he/she is still there, and it’s your mission to reclaim the essence of the individual that once was and bring them out of hiding. Those who were highly sociable and had an active lifestyle prior to having mental decline are most likely to wander. The use of certain antipsychotic medications can cause side effects that increase the desire to wander and be in perpetual motion. Sedating medications can also increase the risk for wandering due to confusion. Other causes of wandering include the following: Memory deficits Poor vision Disorientation Language deficits Searching for security Searching to fulfill an unmet need such as to relieve hunger, thirst, pain, constipation, and the need to urinate Searching for a loved one Boredom Person centered care plans must consequently demonstrate this principle. Here are some examples of appropriate goals: Personalize the resident’s surroundings. Interpret behavior from the resident’s viewpoint. Acknowledge and validate the resident’s feelings. Involve the resident with dementia in decision-making. Create target goals for the resident to achieve based on resident history and his/her skills that have not yet been lost. Focus on the journey- not the results. Evaluate the Behavior Physical Needs: Does the resident need to use the bathroom? Is the behavior due to medication side affects? Is the resident: Hungry, thirsty, or generally uncomfortable? Searching for a place that is warmer or cooker, darker or lighter? Looking for a place that is more familiar (does the resident have familiar belongings in his/her room)? Responding to physical illness, e.g., dehydration, infection, congestive heart failure, etc.? Psychological and Social Needs: Is the resident: Restless or agitated and trying to relieve anxiety? Bored, lonely, or seeking company? Following a previously familiar imprinted routine: acting out movement to and from the bus stop to pick up the children – going to work? Cognitive Needs: Is the resident: Disoriented or lost? Disoriented due to medication side affects Overstimulated or understimulated? For the resident, wandering may be positive if it fulfills a need for exercise, sensory stimulation, or purposeful behavior. Many nursing homes provide a safe environment on a locked unit for this reason. The negative side of wandering is it may lead to falls, excess fatigue, anxiety, accidental exposure to certain chemicals, altercations with other residents and unintended wandering outdoors where more danger may be waiting to cause harm. Make it your mission to find the balance in the day and life of your resident by looking beyond the words or behaviors to discover the feelings that the resident might earnestly be trying to express. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351
  3. View this email in your browser WHAT IS THE LONG TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM (LTCOP)? The Ombudsman program advocates for resident of nursing homes, board and care, assisted living and other similar adult care facilities. State Ombudsmen and their designated representatives work to resolve problems individual residents may encounter and effect change at the local, state, and national levels with the objective of improving the quality of care for the elderly population. The ombudsman service offers a way for older adults to voice their complaints and have concerns addressed so they can live with dignity and respect. Ombudsman provides information about how to find a facility and what to do to get quality care. They are trained to resolve problems and assist the resident with complaints. However, unless the resident gives the Ombudsman permission to share his/her concerns, these matters are kept confidential. Federal Older Americans Act (OAA) Under the federal Older Americans Act (OAA) every state is required to have an Ombudsman Program that addresses complaints and advocates for improvements in the long term care system. Each state has an Office of the State Long Term Care Ombudsman, headed by a full time State Long Term Care Ombudsman who directs the program statewide. Staff and thousands of volunteers are designated by the State Ombudsmen as representatives to directly serve the individual resident’s needs. What is the role of the ombudsman in a healthcare setting? The healthcare ombudsman is employed by the state department of insurance, and works with consumers to resolve conflicts, determine long-term care needs, and provide guidance in bringing insurance carriers and the people who need them together. A nursing home ombudsman advocates for the residents of long-term care facilities. Nursing home ombudsmen protects vulnerable residents and help defend their most basic rights. They handle complaints related to physical and verbal abuse, neglect, and other forms of improper care. NOTE: A Long-Term Care Ombudsman can address most any issue that arises in a long-term care or assisted living facility. Commonly, Ombudsmen will investigate any violations of residents' rights and dignity, and any physical or mental abuse, whether intentional or not. What Concerns Does an Ombudsman Address? Below are a few of the most commonly sought after complaint resolutions that the Ombudsman may need to address: Slow responses to resident calls Poor facility food quality Staffing issues (mistreatment, shortages, inadequate skills, etc.,) A lack of social opportunities & interactions Disruptions in sleep Violation of residents' rights or dignity Physical, verbal, or mental abuse, deprivation of services necessary to maintain residents' physical and mental health, or unreasonable confinement Poor quality of care, including inadequate personal hygiene and slow response to requests for assistance Improper transfer or discharge of patient Inappropriate use of chemical or physical restraints In addition to identifying, investigating, and resolving complaints, Ombudsman programs responsibilities will include: Educating residents, their family and facility staff about residents’ rights, good care practices, and similar long term services and supports resources; Ensuring residents have regular and timely access to ombudsman services; Providing technical support for the development of resident and family councils; Advocating for changes to improve residents’ quality of life and care; Providing information to the public regarding long term care facilities and services, residents’ rights, and legislative and policy issues; Representing resident interests before governmental agencies; and Seeking legal, administrative and other remedies to protect residents. Ombudsman programs do not: Conduct licensing and regulatory inspections or investigations; Perform Adult Protective Services (APS) investigations; or Provide direct care for residents. Residents’ Rights Ombudsman programs help residents, family members, and others understand residents rights and support residents in exercising their rights guaranteed by law> most nursing homes participate in Medicare and Medicaid, and therefore must meet federal requirements, including facility responsibilities and residents rights. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. How to Become an Activity Director in the US Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351
  4. View this email in your browser Resident Rummaging, Hoarding, Hiding It is not unusual to step into a secured Alzheimer’s’ unit where you observe someone actively rummaging or searching through cabinets, drawers, and any number and any manner of subjectively intriguing storage areas, even closets and the refrigerators. It is also a common practice for residents to hide coveted items in the most peculiar places that they will likely be unable to remember later. Although the behavior can be concerning and disruptive, it provides engagement at best but can easily turn into a safety risk. Proactive measures must be implemented to ensure safety that provisions concerning this behavior prevents potential hard to self or others. It is not recommended that you eradicate opportunities for this behavior as it often helps the resident to dissipate anxiety, offers engagement and in fact often helps your resident to feel useful. Note: The behavior might have some level of logic behind the action. Residents often set about this behavior because they are actually looking for something specific, although unable to neither identify nor describe that illusive item. Understanding the Basics According to the Alzheimer's Association, hoarding and hiding behaviors usually begin in the early to middle stages of the disease, and often stem from trying to have some control in their lives. Rummaging, meanwhile, may occur when an individual with Alzheimer’s disease believes something has gone missing. More specifically, the Alzheimer's Association identifies a few possible causes -- psychological, medical and environmental -- for rummaging, hiding, and hoarding, including: Physical changes within the brain leading to confusion, memory loss and impaired judgment The individual senses loss of control The desire for a sense of security or feeling that they may "need" something Seeing and touching things gives them comfort Fear of losing items or being robbed Inability to distinguish between valued and disposable items Boredom, lack of stimulation, and difficulty initiating new activities Reasons for Rummaging Behaviors Boredom: Rummaging behavior may spring from boredom; particularly when opportunities are not abundantly available for engagement. These busy “seekers” are doing just that – keeping busy with something that is found to be self occupying- even when the behavior behind their quest becomes unwanted and has the potential to increase safety risk to self and/or others. Note: In fact, the old adage applies here: “negative attention is better than no attention at all”. Try to quickly understand and recognize what is causing the behavior and measure your response appropriately to prevent that unwanted behavior. Coping Mechanism: Rummaging can be a coping mechanism in response to the disorientation typically caused by dementia. The behavior can occur when the resident is trying to reassure him/herself or self-soothe with familiar items or when they are trying to fill a void or need, like eating when hungry. Loss of Useful Contribution: Consider that what looks like rummaging could also be a way for the resident to feel that they are doing something productive or helps them to feel useful in some way. In the days past, your resident may have fallen into that “problem solver” or “fixer” personality. These characteristics almost are always the reason for “busy seekers” to search for anything that is perceived to be lost items. Triggers: In some cases, the resident with dementia might start rummaging in response to a “triggering” event. The ability to understand the circumstances that “trigger” the unwanted behavior before it occurs puts you way ahead of the game to support a peaceful environment for your resident. Source: https://dailycaring.com/9-ways-to-manage-dementia-rummaging-behavior/ Note: Consider creating a “behavior log” to record the time of day, the surrounding environment, the individuals involved and the type of event to see if there is a repeated situation from which the resident becomes agitated. You will be looking for repeated patterns to determine what circumstances instigate the behavior. “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” Rummaging Freedom [Safe Zone] Treat rummaging as an opportunity for engagement. Include items like clothing, socks, copies of memorable photos, a fake checkbook, reading books, greeting care, or a wallet filled with old receipts, credit card “look alike” and fake money – anything that could spark interest. Hobbies or career related items from the resident history are sure to peak interest. Themed boxes like a sewing or knitting drawer, a sports basket, a costume jewelry box, a tool box, or any music related items, etc. Always show the resident where to find his/her themed box so as not to elevate anxiety levels. Review the following for more ways to create a “safe zone” for resident rummaging: Keep the person with Alzheimer’s from going into unused rooms. This limits his or her rummaging through and hiding things. Do a search to learn where the resident often hides things. Once you find these places, check them often, without the residents’ knowledge. Keep all trash cans securely covered or out of sight. Alzheimer’s residents may not remember the purpose of the container or may rummage through it. Check trash containers before you empty them, in case something of value has been hidden there or thrown away by accident. Note: A resident that often disposes of dentures, hearing aids and/or glasses can make for a very unhappy family member. In addition, loss of such adaptive devices has the potential to further increase resident agitation and increase unwanted behaviors. More ideas to ensure safety and less disruption as follows: Lock up dangerous or toxic products, or place them out of sight and out of reach. Keep backups of frequently lost items to prevent the start of yet another frantic search. Example: Several similar look-a-like handbags stored out of sight will do the trick when the original one becomes lost. You will always be viewed as the hero when you help your resident find that missing handbag. Remove spoiled food from the refrigerator (if accessible) and cabinets. Food gone bad simply becomes a doctor’s visit when consumed due to the resident's lack of judgment and/or sense of taste. Make commonly used items easy to find. The resident behavior may be valid if they are looking for something specific, but can’t find it. This is particularly frustrating when the resident is unable to explain nor describe what they are looking for. Consider putting things in clear containers or specific drawers and label contents. Or keep similar items together, like similar clothing in the same drawer – underwear, tops, bottoms, socks, etc. Failed attempts to stop a resident from hiding, rummaging, hoarding, and or re-organizing things can cause increased agitation and paranoia for the resident that is bound and determined to engage in such behavior. You can mitigate agitation and manage the behavior through creative and inventive ideas that allow the behavior while maintaining a safe and less disruptive environment. In doing so, the resident will regard you as a supportive partner rather than viewing you as someone that is interfering - - and that’s exactly where you want to be. Reference: https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/when-person-alzheimers-rummages-and-hides-things?utm_source=NIA+Main&utm_campaign=8c48100ffd-20190409_rummaging&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ffe42fdac3-8c48100ffd-7499965 Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351
  5. The N.A.P.T. Course is accepted by and prepares each Student for APNCC National Activity Professional Board Certification The APNCC.org AP-BC is the certification recognized under CMS.gov F Tag 680 & 658. For more Information Visit ActivityDirectorUniversity.org Send in a NAPT Course Enrollment Pack to get started! The NAPT course provides all the CE requirements for Path 1 or 2 See if you qualify! Check APNCC Standards Its your Choice! ...Your Affordable Choice ! While you are enrolled and working towards your, or any Accredited Certification Requirements you meet the F680 regulations set forth by the CMS.gov to insure each Activity Professional can complete their accrediting bodies standards. Here is the Federal Regulation For Activity Professionals from CMS.gov Most States do not have a State License or AD Register, these States are governed by F680 (most States) 483.24(c)(2) Section (ii) A . The Activities Program must be directed by a Activity Professional who is Eligible for Certification as a therapeutic recreation specialist or as an activities professional by a recognized accrediting body on or after Oct 1 1990.
  6. Celebrate National Teddy Bear Day on September 9th! Celebrate by sewing teddy bears with your residents as gifts for the upcoming holiday season, for needy children in your community, or as comfort for residents with Alzheimer's or Dementia. Some basic sewing knowledge is necessary for reading patterns and the sewing process, however it is a fairly accessible project. Other suggested ideas are to create a Memory Bear by using clothes of a passed loved one or to use clothes outgrown by a child. Discuss with your residents which direction they would like to go in before you gather up the materials. This is a fun project with a great sense of accomplishment at the end! Materials: One yard of fabric for the body (I used cream color fleece, you can use normal hairy fur fabric too, I used fleece because these are for a little boy and a little girl, so I wanted the bears to be as soft as possible) 1/2 yard of fabric for the color details (I used light brown) One set of animal eyes 18mm a small piece of felt for the nose (you can use felt for the eyes too if gifting it to a baby- for safety reasons) Stuffing material (I used polyester filling) Sewing machine or thread and needle for hand-stitching Full Tutorial + Pattern The World's Most Expensive Teddy Bears Source: https://www.expensive-world.com/most-expensive-teddy-bear/ #11 Steiff Hot Water Bottle Teddy Bear – $ 40,358 This was the childhood bear of Mary Vernon Pegge born 24 September 1903 at the Elms, Briton Ferry, Wales. This teddy bear having been with her all her life. As the name suggests, this teddy bear can actually hold a tiny hot water bottle in the opening on the front of this teddy. Steiff produced these bears around 1907, but they never really caught on halting further production. Their rarity is has bumped up their worth, with one selling for 31,200 pounds or $40,358. #10 Happy Steiff Bear – $ 55,000 Even $ 55,000 is a huge sum, at least as far as teddy bears are concerned. Steiff’s merry mohair bear was produced as far back as 1926. In 1989, it was bought by Paul Volpp and given to his wife Rosemary for the 42nd wedding anniversary and a sign of endless love. #9 Harlequin Bear – $ 60,610 The teddy bear, made by Steiff in 1925, is the 8th most expensive teddy bear in the world. Because of the differently colored halves of his face, he was named Harlequin. This colorful critter may look playful, but his price is no joke. The rare bear was sold at Christie’s in 2010 for 46,850 pounds or $60,610. #8 Blue Elliot Bear – $ 64,200 It is assumed that Elliot was produced as a sample for the British department store, Harold’s. He would have been one of six different colored bears in the sample production. Unfortunately, Elliot never went on to full production, making any surviving examples extremely rare. In early December 1993, Elliot sold at an all-teddy-bear auction for £49,500 or $ 64,200. Accounting for inflation, that’s more than £95,000 today — or more than $160,000 at current conversion rates. #7 Diamond Eyes Bear – $ 84,000 Another prestigiously expensive teddy bear produced by the German toy house Steiff . Gold muzzle, sapphires and diamonds in place of eyes, fur interwoven with gold threads. This is what a teddy bear made by Steiff on the 125th anniversary of its successful operation looks like. There are only 125 collector pieces in the world. #6 Steiff’s Oldest Teddy Bear – $ 105,000 The bear, made in 1904, is the world’s oldest teddy bear. Like many bears on this list, it was made by Steiff. According to Reuters, it was sold in Germany in 2000 for an estimated $105,000. #5 Supreme Louis Vuitton Teddy Bear – $ 106,016 This Supreme x Louis Vuitton teddy bear is the pinnacle of fashion royalty branding and it went via auction overnight for a cool $106,016.08. As it stands, full proceeds from its final price will be used to benefit the BBC Children in Need — an organization aiming to ensure every child in the UK has a safe, happy and secure environment in which to grow. The doll is 100% authentic and certified from BBC Children in Need. #4 Steiff Titanic Mourning Bear – $ 136,000 In 1912, the first black fur Steiff teddies were manufactured to be given as mourning gifts after the sinking of the Titanic. They were made in five different sizes and only 665 bears were produced. In 2000, one of the mourning bears sold for $136,000 to the Puppenhaus Museum in Switzerland, according to The Telegraph. #3 Steiff Teddy Girl Bear – $ 143,000 When Colonel Bob Henderson was born in 1905, he was gifted with the Teddy Girl bear. During his successful career as Colonel in the British Army, he was sure to keep his favorite bear alongside himself. After Henderson had passed away in 1990, his Teddy Girl was sold at auction for over $143,000 in 1994, which is a record, according to Reuters. #2 Bear with Louis Vuitton monograms – $ 182,000 The second most expensive teddy bear in the world was made independently by fashion mogul Louis Vuitton. This teddy bear was created to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the LV brand. There are only 500 specimens of bears with the cute name DouDou. It was for sale in Monaco, the city of the rich. #1 Steiff Louis Vuitton Teddy Bear – $ 2.1 million The teddy bear, which was created by the moguls Louis Vuitton and Steiff, is the most expensive teddy bear in the world, as we have not yet recorded the existence of another teddy bear that would sell so well at auctions. The world-renowned fashion brand and toy manufacturer have worked together to create a teddy bear that exudes elegance and prestige. In 2000, the bear was sold at auction in Monaco, where it was bought by Korean Jessie Kim. It can currently be viewed at the Teddy Bear Museum in the Korean city of Jeju. Get Full Recipe HERE Ugly Ted, World's Ugliest Teddy Bear Over 300 ADN Nationally Certified Activity Directors so far this year! Are you ready for a Great Career! The Job Market is HOT! APNCC Your Affordable Choice! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351
  7. Visual Impairment May Be Early Dementia Risk Factor Visual impairment may be a risk factor for dementia, according to a study published in JAMA Ophthalmology. In this study women with baseline objective visual impairment were more likely to develop dementia after an average follow-up of 3.8 years. Researchers notes that self-reported visual impairment was not associated with any risk of dementia or MCI (Mild Cognitive Impairment). However, data showed “visual impairment was associated with an even higher likelihood of dementia when combined with self-reported hearing loss.” The researchers found women with visual acuity of 20/100 or worse at baseline were at the greatest risk for developing dementia. When it comes to the risk of developing MCI (Mild Cognitive Impairment), this group also had the greatest risk. The results suggest interventions to improve visual acuity in older adults may be beneficial. “Older adults who undergo cataract surgery have been suggested to have lower risk of new-onset dementia, and other studies have suggested improved cognitive scores after cataract surgery”. Here are a few examples of warning signs that may be a tell tale presentation that may lead to visual complications. Consult with your nursing team if your resident either displays or complains of the following: Sudden eye pain: redness and nausea – this could mean a sudden but severe bout of narrow-angle glaucoma and may lead to vision loss. Spots and floaters in his/her field of vision: This may be due to the separation of the gel-like interior of the eye from the retina and is a normal part of aging. However, if symptoms are sudden or associated with ongoing flashes of light your resident could be presenting with a tear or detachment of the retina. Surface pain, tearing, or irritation: May be symptoms of dry eye syndrome, a condition that is more annoying than sight-threatening. Double vision: This is an important symptom, which should not be ignored. Dark curtain sensation across the visual field: If this is temporary, disappearing after a few seconds or minutes, then it would be important to check for a mini-stroke. Although many previous studies have reported associations between visual impairment and impaired cognition, evidence has been mixed. Individuals with visual impairment may perform poorly on cognitive tests, especially tests with visual components. Individuals with visual impairment may experience less cognitive stimulation thus, progressively decline, emotionally retreat or simply lose interest in the world around them. It boils down to the old adage: “Use it or lose it!” That said, prevention, early detection, and management are key priorities as population aging leads to rapid growth in dementia prevalence. In particular, identifying potentially modifiable risk factors is essential to ensure that patients have access to interventions and support when they are most able to benefit. According to the researchers in this study, the results suggest interventions to improve visual acuity in older adults may be beneficial. These findings suggest potential value for early vision screening and vision-improving interventions. Facilities must care plan and customize resident programming to ensure that residents with sight limitations are given appropriated adaptations to continue to finding pleasure and thus, a reason to fully participate in cognitively stimulating opportunities. Those of you that are managing therapeutic interest and needs based programming are likely to be spending more overall quantitative time with the aging population you serve than any other interdisciplinary healthcare professionals and as such, you will not only get to know your resident’s psychosocial frame of mind but will undoubtedly become acutely aware of your resident’s clinical diagnosis. The degree of time you spend in direct contact with your resident puts you at a vantage point for spotting those subtle nuances or even perhaps minuet changes that could actually be red flag warnings of an impending clinical and/or behavioral issues to seek nursing consultation for. https://www.medicaloptics.ie/ten-warning-signs-of-vision-problems-in-the-elderly/ https://www.ajmc.com/view/visual-impairment-may-be-early-dementia-risk-factor https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/2764384? Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1982 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  8. Internal Validation to Prevent Job Burnout Many of us, admittedly most of us, look for some level of external feedback in the form of recognition to measure the importance of what we do. Feedback from our family, friends, business associates or coworkers helps us to develop a sense of personal and professional contribution. But all too frequently we give away our power to others to rate how successful we are while working to achieve our goals. The success of our own internal ability to self-motivate will increase or decrease greatly when those external sources say yeah or nah to what we do often leading to a make or break attitude. We can usually count on our loved ones to give us what we need to succeed but that is not the expected scenario out there in the working world. It is neither rewarding nor any fun to toil away at a job where your efforts go unnoticed. You are especially prone to those influences when the elements of your work are demanding both physically and emotionally. Give Yourself Permission Give yourself permission to find reward and value in what you do. When we are waiting for those external sources to find time during their busy work day to give us praise for work well done, we stand in pause, a momentary state of waiting for validation and responses to unanswered questions. Are we valued, are we not valued for our work? Did we do as well as we thought we did – did we do as well as we wanted to? Permit yourself to self-reflect and self-rate what you do first and then proceed to include the input from those outside sources. Establishing a sense of a job well done is the best way to prevent burnout. Ask yourself if your still leaving work at the end of the day feeling satisfaction and excitement upon the thought of returning back to work the next day. Seek Direction Before evaluation date, pursue a dialogue with your work supervisor to ask how you are doing. Your approach should not be defensive but rather should be to seek better understanding of what is expected and whether you are on the right track. Ask for clarification if need be so you can make a clear plan of action to meet your job requirements. You will ensure that you remain on target to be in line to move into another position of more responsibility if you have aspirations to do so. You are looking to partner with your supervisor in a way that supports the overall mission and goals of your department. Your supervisor will remember and appreciate this meeting when your actual performance rating is scheduled. Education There is never a time when we have learned it all, regardless of what position or professional status one may have achieved. Continued education is not only consistently required to maintain certifications but continues to provide one of the largely single greatest source of renewed interest in any given career path. Learning sparks introspective thought that provokes one to look for better and more current strategies to improve delivery and discover more effective ways to offer the services provided. Job burnout is often seen to take hold when work tasks become mundane in nature or otherwise automatic and lack the need for individualized thought process thus, mind stimulation through continued education provides a pathway that may prevent that “same old same old” mind set. You Are Not Alone- Join the Team Protect yourself from that “it’s me and me alone” feeling. No one success story in any profession, business or leadership role was ever accomplished by just one individual alone. Plans are devised policies and procedures are written but it takes the entire team to create a synergy. Remember … “IT TAKES A VILLAGE”. Here are a few qualities that a successful team possess: Group focus on goals and mutual support of each other’s achievements. Everyone contributes their fair share – jointly collaborating towards a common action plan. The team offers each other support and develops natural synergy amongst the group. Unity of individualized members creates a collaboration of diversity that creates success. Good leadership is balanced by each individuals unique leadership style. Look Around for Validation Look for those rewards that are not spoken; those quiet subtle nuances that speak volumes. You will see it in the smiles, it will present in the body language, it will be reflected in the positive behaviors and in the active engagement of those you serve. Take time at the end of each day or week to reflect on what went well and what didn’t go as well. This task helps you to recall both what you’re good at and why you do what you do. Concentrate on the positive to nourish your self esteem and self-validate your achievements. Those external sources charged with rating you in the work world will also see that you have that special quality – that capacity to improve the quality of life of others in a meaningful way. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  9. Celebrate Capture the Sunset Week Third Full Week in July The third full week in July is Capture the Sunset Week. We all love a great sunset and July is the perfect month to honor them. Invite your residents and co-workers to participate by capturing the sunset in any medium they are comfortable working in. Have participants turn them in throughout the month and place on display all around the facility with credit given. Below are some examples of different artistic mediums to consider: Watercolor Pastels Ink/Pencil Photography Collage Pressed Flowers Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Celebrate Embrace Your Geekness Day July 13th, 2021 In this day in age, we are all a little geeky. It's just the nature of the times. There are certain gadgets that are more well suited to some. Today we will look at some gadgets geared towards seniors. There may even be some that you could incorporate into your department. Try and get at least one of them on hand to celebrate this holiday and to discuss other gadgets that your residents may enjoy having in the facility. Sock Aid SpillNot Cup Holder Uccello Electric Safety Kettle Digital Clocks for Dementia/Impaired Vision Sony Wireless TV Handy Speaker Share Tweet Share Pin Forward July is National Watermelon Month! Celebrate by carving a watermelon into a fruit bowl and filling it with delicious summer fruit for your residents. Buy Now $19.95 Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  10. Our residents no longer have their fathers to celebrate this day with, however they are always together in spirit. Have residents create a special rock with their father's name on it and a picture or drawing that speaks to them. Place the rocks around in a garden to create a Father's Day Garden. A beautiful reminder that will help the residents to feel more connected. Share Tweet Share Pin Forward The Best and Worst Dads of All Time by History.com This Father’s Day, we bring you five men who exemplify some of history’s finest parenting—along with five others you’ll be glad you never had to call Dad. 1. Charlemagne King of the Franks and emperor of the Romans in the late eight and early ninth centuries, Charlemagne had 20 children, some with wives and others with concubines. He insisted that they all receive a thorough education, including the girls. When one of his sons, known as Pepin the Hunchback, was found guilty of participating in a plot to kill Charlemagne, it was expected that he would be executed along with his co-conspirators. Instead, the emperor took pity on Pepin, ordered his sentence commuted and sent him to a monastery. Nicholas II, the last emperor of Russia, in 1914, with his wife Alexandra and his children Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia and Alexei. (Credit: New York Public Library/Getty Images) 2. Czar Nicholas II The last Russian emperor, Nicholas had five children with his wife, the German-born Alix of Hesse. A loving father, Nicholas was especially concerned with the health of his only son and heir, Alexei, who suffered from hemophilia. Their child’s illness led the czar and his wife to consult the controversial healer Rasputin, whose influence over the royal family compromised their standing on the eve of the Russian revolution. 3. Mark Twain Mark Twain and his wife, Olivia, had three daughters during their 34-year marriage. Though he doted on all his children, Twain was particularly close with his oldest, Susy, who shared his love of acting and writing. He based at least two major characters in his novels on her. When she died of meningitis as a young woman in 1896, Twain fell into a deep depression. Later, he included passages written by Susy about her father in his autobiography. 4. Cicero A prominent ancient Roman statesman and philosopher, Cicero adored his daughter Tullia and was devastated when she died of complications from childbirth in 45 B.C. Inconsolable despite his friends’ many letters of condolence, some of which are still in existence, Cicero isolated himself for several weeks at the home of his friend Atticus, where he read texts by Greek philosophers about how to overcome grief. He later divorced his second wife, Pubilia, supposedly because she had not been sufficiently saddened by her stepdaughter’s death. 5. Charles Darwin The father of modern evolutionary science was also a devoted dad to 10 children, of whom two died in infancy. He played a central role in raising and educating his brood at a time when childrearing was seen as women’s work. The death in 1851 of 10-year-old Annie was a crushing blow for Darwin and his wife, Emma, and some have speculated that it caused him to lose his religious faith. 6. Peter the Great The ambitious and erratic Peter, who ruled Russia from 1682 to 1725, fathered 14 children (many of whom died young) with his two wives. Not known for his warm parenting style, he famously contributed to the death of his first-born son, Alexei, who had been convicted of conspiring to kill his father, despite a lack of concrete evidence. Before his planned execution, Alexei died in his prison cell of wounds sustained during a torture session. 7. Constantine the Great The Roman emperor Constantine, who ruled from 306 A.D. until his death in 337, fathered six children with his two wives. He had a close working relationship with his eldest son, Crispus, who oversaw many of his father’s military campaigns. For reasons that remain unclear, Constantine ordered his son’s execution in 326; Crispus’ name was erased from official records and monuments dedicated to him were destroyed. 8. Thomas Boleyn Born into a noble English family around 1477, Thomas Boleyn spent his career currying favor with King Henry VIII, earning a succession of prestigious appointments. He may have had a hand in the romantic involvement of both his daughters with Henry, who first had an affair with Mary Boleyn and later pursued her older sister, Anne. As Henry’s obsession with Anne grew, so did Thomas’ standing in court, and some have speculated that he pressured his daughter to insist on wedding the king, who was already married at the time. Three years after the controversial marriage, Anne, having failed to produce a male heir, fell out of favor and was beheaded for high treason; her brother George suffered the same fate. Thomas, meanwhile, had done nothing to protect his two children despite his influence and the fact that they were almost certainly innocent. "Ivan the Terrible Killing His Son" by Ilya Repin. 9. Ivan the Terrible A successful czar who expanded the borders of his realm but was probably plagued by mental illness, Ivan ruled Russia from 1533 until his death in 1584. It is likely that his nine children suffered years of abuse at his hands. In 1581 he beat his pregnant daughter-in-law as punishment for wearing revealing clothing, causing her to miscarry. Her husband, also named Ivan, angrily confronted his father, who had banished his son’s first two wives to convents after pronouncing them infertile. Incensed, the czar struck his heir on the head with his scepter. The younger Ivan died a few days later as his remorseful father prayed by his bedside for a miracle. Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images 10. Herod the Great King of Judea from 37 to 4 B.C., Herod is remembered as an ambitious but cruel and paranoid ruler who infamously ordered the executions of several members of his own family. These included his second wife, his mother-in-law, his brother-in-law and three of his sons. Share Tweet Share Pin Forward The Worst Father's Day Gifts EVER! Source: www.krforadio.com Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  11. Independence for Alzheimer’s Residents When someone has Alzheimer’s with presenting dementia, their cognitive function continues to decline but they still posses’ abilities. In fact, skilled healthcare professionals know that continuing to do as much as they can do at their current ability level stimulates the brain and may even help to maintain skills longer. However, family members unknowingly often cause “excess disability” when in their sincere earnest to be helpful, do everything for his/her loved one to make life less challenging for the dementia diagnosed individual. Excess Disability - “Use it or lose it” When you provide opportunities for residents to do for themselves it prevents those intrinsically rooted skills from becoming rusty and ultimately no longer useable. It cannot be overstated how important purposeful activities are when discussing dementia and topics referencing motivation and engagement. Purposeful activities focused on interests work harmoniously to entice and elicit responses essential to maintain the “use it or lose it” concept. As dementia progresses, older adults are capable of less and less. Helping them find self-motivated desires to participate in everyday tasks and activities can boost mood and improve quality of life and holds the power to raise self-esteem and reduce common dementia behaviors, like agitation, repeated questions, and anger. Adapting everyday tasks with purposeful meaning for the individual diagnosed with dementia will entice and encourage mental stimulation, and provide support as needed to help older adults maintain a sense of independence and accomplishment and that is something everyone of us strive to maintain for as long as it possible. Why Are Dementia Activities So Important? 1. Provides Daily Structure: A structured and consistent daily routine gives needed predictability and stability when the individual is feeling disoriented and confused. 2. Prevents Decline: Continuing to do as many activities and daily tasks as independently as possible helps to preserve innate skills for a longer period of time despite disease progression. 3. Improves Mood: The individuals capabilities continue to decline with disease progression. When individuals participate in everyday tasks can boost mood and improve overall quality of life. 4. Reduce Challenging Behaviors: Challenging behaviors present with less occurrence when opportunities are made available to engage the individual in positive oriented everyday distractions. Thereby, providing a means to release energy and unexpressed emotions. Supporting Remaining Skills Look for adaptive strategies & techniques that focus on strengths/skills that the individual still possesses. Allow the individual to retain as much control as possible to help foster a sense of personal dignity. Integrate “chunking” methods - (break down tasks step by step) move to the next task in the sequence only when the previous one has been completed. Attention span may be limited so plan programs of no more than 20 to 45 minutes of time segments. Programs are most effective when they are multi-sensory & spanned over consecutive days; first day – taste applesauce, next day – taste apple pie, and so on (connects related theme to facilitate memory input). Incorporate events that “elicit” a response through use of basic sensory stimulation & awareness of his/her body movements. Strategies and Techniques Meeting the individual abilities will ensure greater success. Particularly when maintaining the overall goal to support opportunities for independence and accomplishment. Set-Up: Pre-plan what is needed in a manner that cues the resident to complete the task independently. Example: clothing – Place items in order of use: underwear and bra on top, shirt and pants under them. Visual Distance Supervision: Remain within the line of sight to supervise and assist when needed yet distant enough to allow the individual to complete on their own. Example: Drying dishes – stand within visual view to make sure the dishes are properly towel dried - replace the towel when it has become saturated with water. Non Verbal Prompting: Minimize verbal instructions, simply point to the next task in the sequence to give guidance. Example: Point to the place mat. When it is placed on the table, point to the plate or ask what’s next? Gentle Verbal Cues: Provide gentle verbal “cues” only as needed to prevent frustration by stating simply directions for task sequence, allow time as needed for the individual to complete one task before you offer another cue to move onto the next task. Example: Bathing – Pick up the washcloth… turn the faucet on… wet the washcloth. Physical Guidance: Use "hand over hand” or “mirror” techniques to help guide physical actions. Example: Brushing teeth: Stand behind and place your hand over the individuals hand while holding the toothbrush. Gentle provide physical guidance for brushing teeth. Note: “Excess disability” refers to the loss of an ability that comes from something other than the disease or impairment itself. In dementia care, this generally refers to the loss of abilities that go beyond the physiological changes that are caused by the dementia. You can become the catalyst to support your residents’ independence by proactively preserving your residents’ existing abilities to help them maintain their dignity, self-esteem and enjoy a well deserved quality of life experience well into their senior years and that’s a pretty amazing accomplishment! Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  12. Celebrate Great Outdoor Month and National Trails Day on June 5th (the first Saturday in June)! Gather your residents that are able and willing and get them involved in a light hike. There are trails absolutely everywhere that you may not even know about! Check out the app All Trails and put in your zip code for a complete list of all hikes near you, including their length and level of intensity. Pick a light trail to make sure your residents are all able to complete it without issue. www.AllTrails.com Useful hiking tips for active seniors By Stef Zisovska Source: www.OutdoorRevival.com Hiking is the best outdoor activity for people from any generation. There are many out there that don’t like to accept it, but the fact is hiking rules. Also, there are many health benefits to be had if you practice it once a week. There is no need to mention that spending time in the wilderness and walking alongside fields, streams, and rivers is especially useful for active seniors who like to stay fit and keep themselves in a good and healthy condition. Why take dozens of pills and feel sick much of the time when you can resolve many physical issues for free while enjoying nature at the same time. Here are some useful hiking tips for elderly people who refuse to give up! Hike safely Before heading to your first hiking trail, consult your doctor about it and check for any ailments that might need to be addressed. As an active senior, it’s always better to go hiking early in the morning or in the afternoon when the temperatures are not too high and won’t affect your blood pressure. If you want to go alone, don’t forget to let your family or your neighbor know where it is that you’re going and when you expect to be back. Take plenty of water (at least 2 liters), protein bars, nuts, a safety whistle in case you get lost, a rain jacket (bright colors preferred), a cell phone (if you’re planning to hike near the city), first-aid kit, and an extra pair of socks. Dress appropriately Don’t try to be fancy or wear jeans on the trail. Hiking is an outdoor activity that requires a lot of effort and sweating, so go for working out clothes if possible. Dress in layers that can be stripped off. As for your feet, always wear sturdy tennis shoes if the terrain is not too demanding. Otherwise, good old hiking boots are what you need to have at home just in case you decide to climb a difficult route. Stretch before you start walking Always do some basic warm-up stretching exercises that will help your muscles prepare for the challenge. There are trails that may seem to be easy for you and you think no warm-up is needed, but that’s not the reality. No matter how old you are, you need to stretch all your muscles before starting any ascent, even the lowest hill in the world. Hike at your own pace Hiking is not racing, and there is absolutely no need for you to compete with anyone else from your group. The point of it is not who will finish the loop first, but who will enjoy it the most. So, don’t push yourself to do something that your body doesn’t like, but hike at your own pace. If you run into obstacles that you don’t feel ready for, just slow down, think twice, and if necessary go back and ask for help. Why force your body to do something that doesn’t suit it? Start with short hikes If you are a senior and you’ve never hiked before, no problem, as it’s never too late. What you need to be aware of is your watch. When starting out, try doing 30-minute to 1-hour hikes and see how you feel afterward. Do this twice a week and if you feel you’re gaining more strength, start adding 15 more minutes to each hike. Try hiking poles or a walking stick If you have problems with your balance, there is no reason for you to not be spending time in nature. Be brave, get hiking poles and go out there to conquer the beautiful landscapes that surround you. Hold your stick or poles so that your elbows are at a comfortable 90-degree angle. Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Celebrate National Doughnut Day (always first Friday in June)! To celebrate this fine day you could just make a doughnut spread on a food cart with some hot coffee. Or...if you work at facility where spirits are welcome, check out these unique doughnut and wine pairings for a fun twist on this beloved breakfast staple. Dunk Into National Doughnut Day With These Doughnut And Wine Pairings by:Jeff Licciardello Source: www.vinepair.com National Doughnut Day is finally upon us and you bet your bottom dollar we’re going to be celebrating at the VinePair office. While it is generally expected that you should pair a good cup of coffee with a doughnut, expectations are for people who don’t like Thai food and think that Times New Roman is the ONLY font acceptable for use. TAKE IT FROM US, ? BE LIKE THEM. Throw the expectations out the freaking window (literally throw your cup of coffee out the damn window) and get your corkscrew instead. We’ve matched classic doughnuts with their perfect vino. And before your boss even asks, yes, it’s acceptable to drink wine in the morning if there’s a doughnut attached to it. Obvi. Original Plain- Chardonay Old faithful doughnut, meet old faithful wine. The old fashioned doughnut is light and fluffy, but still rich and decadent. A lightly oaked or even an unoaked Chardonnay has extremely similar qualities but it’s the tropical notes that are going to take the plain doughnut to the next level. Glazed – Brut Champagne The one. The only. The classically glazed doughnut is a go-to for the morning masses. Because it’s very sweet, we’ve opted for a Brut Champagne that will still carry a touch of sugar, but won’t overpower the doughnut. Chocolate Frosted – Merlot What makes this doughnut so special is the fact that it’s a lighter base doughnut with an supremely divine chocolate topping. Take advantage of the sweet-cocoa flavors with a Merlot. It’s easy to drink (just like these damn doughnuts are easy to eat) and has enough spicy berry notes to tango with the chocolate. Strawberry Frosted – Rosé In my humble opinion, the strawberry frosted doughnut is the greatest doughnut to ever exist. Not only is it ICONIC, it’s sweet, fruity, and comes with sprinkles. WHO doesn’t like sprinkles? When you think pink with your doughnuts you need to think pink with the wine. A Rosé (Grenache is probably your best bet) is dry enough to not compete with the sugary frosting while delivering the floral notes this doughnut needs. It’s also Instagram ready, so what else could you ask for? Vanilla Frosted – Dry Riesling The vanilla frosted is the old-fashioned doughnut taken to the -nth degree of sweetness. Your ideal wine pairing here is something that has flavors to harmoniously blend with the vanilla but can still stand up to the excess sugar. A dry Riesling is just what the doughnut doctor ordered. Jelly – Malbec Depending on the doughnut shop you go to, the jelly-filled doughnut can be sweet, savory, or even somewhere in-between. Generally, you can expect a jelly doughnut to consist of red berry filling, thus we recommend a Malbec. Malbec has a lot of the darker berry flavors that can transform your plain raspberry filled doughnut into a mixed-berry masterpiece. Sour Cream – Prosecco An extremely underappreciated doughnut, the sour cream doughnut is irresistibly intoxicating. It’s on the heavier side so it needs a moderate amount of bubbles to cut through the fat. We recommend a Prosecco here because it has just enough sweetness to blend with the doughnut. Chocolate Cake – Cabernet Sauvignon A doughnut as deep and dark as the chocolate cake doughnut needs a wine that can stand by its side. Cabernet Sauvignon is this dougnut’s full-bodied match made in heaven because its dark fruity flavors can handle the death-by-chocolate-drama that the chocolate cake doughnut brings to the table. Blueberry – Pinot Grigio Another doughnut that isn’t as appreciated, the blueberry doughnut is actually set up to perfectly pair with a Pinot Grigio. The abundant lemon notes of the Pinot Grigio are the best complement to the heavy blueberry flavors from the blueberry doughnut. Apple Fritter/Cider Doughnut – Chenin Blanc Putting the debate of what actually makes a doughnut aside, the apple fritter is a favorite to many. Who can blame them, it’s sweet, slightly tart, and even has a subtle cinnamon spice. It’s basically fall in a doughnut and there’s only one wine we’re thinking of that would complement this perfectly – Chenin Blanc. A Chenin Blanc is the long lost twin of the apple fritter with its tropical flavors, splash of apple notes, and tang. Boston Cream – Extra-Brut Champagne Last but certainly not least, the Boston cream doughnut is as full-flavored as they come. This handheld version of the Boston cream pie is so heavenly rich, it needs a dry wine full of bubbles to slice right through the pastry cream. Thankfully, an Extra-Brut Champagne is up for the job. Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Celebrate Best Friends Day on June 8th! In honor of this Best Friends Day, we have created a Memory Dive worksheet that focuses on 'My Childhood Best Friend'. Click the link to grab your FREE copy! Free Memory Dive Worksheet Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Dad's lessons will always be better, though. Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  13. Celebrate Mother's Day on May 9th! Mother's Day is coming up quick! Pass this fun Mother's Day Quiz out to your residents to test their Mother's Day knowledge. Answer sheet included. Click Below for a FREE Mother's Day Pop Quiz! Free Mother's Day Pop Quiz Printable Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Celebrate Internat'l Hummus Day on May 13th! Crostini with Balsamic Strawberries and Ricotta Makes 12 appetizers by SheKeepsaLovelyHome.com Ingredients ½ cup strawberries, chopped ¼ cup balsamic vinegar 1 tsp. lemon zest 2 tsp. brown sugar 5 tbsp. ricotta ½ baguette Steps 1. Slice the baguette into 12 ½ inch slices. Toast them at 350 F. for 5 minutes or until nicely toasted. 2. While your tiny toasts are toasting... Click Below for Full Recipe! Get Recipe Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  14. Celebrate Cartoonist Day on May 5th! There just may be a hidden cartoonist in us all! To celebrate Cartoonist Day we have created a FREE set of 4 blank cartoon pages for your residents to utilize. Invite your residents to create a comic or graphic shorts of any kind. It doesn't have to be superheroes and villains or Sunday morning funny.... everyday scenes can be depicted. This opens the door for more creative and varied stories to come forth in the work. Display the stories with permission. Click Below for a FREE Cartoonist Day Activity Pack! Free Cartoonist Day Pack May is Mystery Month! I love a good mystery! Chance are many of your residents do too! In honor of this month's theme, setup a Top Sleuth Contest utilizing the fantastic interactive website www.5minutemystery.com. How it Works: Setup a free account on www.5minutemystery.com. Select 31 different mysteries from the mystery archives and create a list for each participant. These are to be attempted in order, on a daily basis throughout the month of May. Print out the mystery for the day and hand it out to each resident. Instruct residents to circle the main clues in the story and then write their primary suspect down before turning it in to you at the end of each day. Check the answers through 5 Minute Mystery and keep a tally of each resident's progress. Optional- Create a public bulletin board with each resident and their ranking throughout the month. Throw a mystery themed party for the top 3 Sleuths and award them with a Top Sleuth award and gift. NOTE: If your residents have access to the internet, they can create their own accounts and attempt it online. By doing it this way, they can note their completion time as an added component of the competition. Simply have them attempt it once and mark their suspect and time. Check out the story below to get a feel for how it works. Check your answer by clicking the link below the story. Department Store Murder Written by Tom Fowler Source: www.5minutemystery.com Leon Adams clocked in a few minutes before 10:00 a.m. on a very mild and sunny Tuesday in April, as he was supposed to. It took only a few minutes to open the cash registers in the men’s department. Leon was a suit salesman and he knew from experience that the first couple of hours on a weekday would be very slow. Slow to the point of boredom. So, he was surprised when customers began to show up shortly after opening. The first to arrive was Ed Puckett, (Leon would introduce himself to all of the morning customers and learn their names). Leon greeted Ed as he entered the men’s area. Ed looked around and picked out a few suits to try on in the fitting room. Ed had not been back there long when Leon’s second customer, Louis Murphy, showed up at the cash register asking about a good deal on a sport coat and pair of slacks. Leon helped Louis in finding them and led him back to the fitting room. Meanwhile, Ed was still in the dressing room. Leon was pleased that he had two customers in his area so early -- it was only 10:20. Leon spotted Gene Roberts browsing the edge of the men’s area at 10:25, just after noticing that Ed had left the dressing room. What a busy day! It was difficult to keep track of so many customers. Leon could see Ed wandering in the shoe department, so he moved on to his next sale, greeting Gene and escorting him to the dress shirt table, all the while Louis examined himself in the fitting room’s full length mirror. He hoped Louis would like the sport coat and slacks he was trying on. Although he was some distance away from him, the garments appeared to be a good fit. Justin Tanner came in at 10:30 and asked Leon where the men’s sweaters were. Leon walked Justin over to the sweater table. Justin thanked him and said he wanted to pick one out to try on in the fitting room. As Justin was browsing the sweaters, Leon decided to check on Louis. As he walked back toward the fitting room, he saw Louis walk away from the mirror and return to his dressing room. It was only 10:36 and Leon was having an uncharacteristically busy weekday. At 10:45, Leon saw Justin enter the fitting room with a green sweater and Leon noticed that Louis was still in his dressing room. At 10:50 George Whitley walked over to Leon from the shoe department and asked about a catalog order. Leon placed the order for him at the cash register, but it took a few minutes and he did not finish with it until after 11:00. George paid for the order, which was a pair of dress slacks, and left. At 11:04, Leon noticed Justin leaving the men’s department. He had not purchased the sweater. At 11:10, Leon knew that Louis had never left his dressing room and went to check on him. When he found him, he received the shock of his life. Louis was dead on the floor with a knife wound in his heart. Blood covered the carpeting of the small fitting room. Mercifully, there were now no customers in the men’s department as Gene Roberts had left without trying anything on. Leon held on to his composure long enough to return to the cashier station and call the store security officer, Ronald Clay. Leon’s mouth was hot and dry as Ronald answered his phone, saying simply, “Clay speaking.” Leon stammered, “Ron, get over to the suit fitting room. A customer has been murdered.” Ronald was the retired detective Lieutenant Ronald Clay of the city police department. He came to work at the store after retiring from a 25-year career as a law enforcement officer. There wasn’t much that went on in the store that escaped his attention. Leon was grateful he was on duty and available to handle this nightmare. Clay quickly found the shocked Leon still standing at the cash register. Firmly, but gently, Ronald had Leon lead him to the deceased customer. As soon as Clay saw him he knew who it was. He said, “I know this guy. He’s Louis Murphy. I dealt with him and his friends quite a bit when I was on the Force. He’s known as ‘Louie the Lip’ and is a career mobster.” Weakly, Leon asked, “So you think another crook got to him?” “Yeah,’ Ron replied. “It’s too much of a coincidence for it not to be mob related.” Dryly, he added, “I’ve never seen a person murdered in a department store dressing room before, and I’ve seen a lot.” Within minutes, the store closed and a dozen police officers appeared on the scene. Clay knew that the key to solving the murder quickly rested with Leon, who always knew where men’s department customers were at any given time. Ronald led him back to his office for a quiet visit. He wanted to speak with him before his former associates did. After determining Leon was recovered sufficiently from the shock, he asked him to relate all of the morning’s activities he could remember. Leon remembered everything and relayed the activities and movements of the five customers in detail. Clay listened intently. After considering what he had been told, they went to the video room and reviewed the security tapes. After watching it a couple of times, Ronald told Leon, “This is the murderer.” Check Your Answer Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Celebrate Internat'l Hummus Day on May 13th! Hummus Cucumber Cups Makes 24 appetizers Written by AlwaysOrderDessert.Com Ingredients 2 English Cucumbers, cut into 1 1/2" thick rounds Kosher salt 1 10oz container hummus (or about 1 1/2 cups of your favorite homemade hummus) 1/2 cup pine nuts, toasted Finely minced parsley, for garnish Steps Use a melon baller or round measuring spoon... Get Full Recipe Below! Get Recipe Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  15. This recognition will take place May 9-15 and will honor the collaborative commitment of skilled nursing care facilities and their staff in providing compassionate care to their residents during these unprecedented times. Over the past year, despite the challenges of the current pandemic, skilled care centers and their staff have shown an incredible and steadfast commitment to providing quality care and ensuring the safety of their residents. This recognition does not come as a surprise given the daunting challenges that our front line “essential workers” have had to overcome to ensure the safety and well being of our residents. The week will focus on the collective efforts and the amazing strength and dedication of those who worked tirelessly each and every day to care for and protect the frail, elderly, and disabled adults in long term care. With each new season comes new beginnings, and together we will get to a place and time of healing. Why is it Important to Recognize Milestones Nevertheless, celebrating milestones along the path towards our goals is a crucial component of engagement. It helps honor the hard work folks are putting in, recognizing achieved goals, and simply creates a more positive environment. The intent to offer time to recognize these areas sprinkles coveted “positivity” throughout the facility for both residents and staff members. Milestones, whether personal or work-related, become inspiring memories that are needed to renew our energy supply and shouldn't go unrecognized. Celebrating achievements is a way for us to see how far we've come and can serve as our motivation should another challenge present itself. When recognition brings attention to efforts having a direct impact on the success of a company, it motivates staff and contributes to a sense of united celebratory reward that values the staff and honors resident well being. It also contributes greatly to meaningful organizational purpose. Programming Ideas Established by the American Health Care Association (AHCA) in 1967, NSNCW, formerly known as National Nursing Home Week, recognizes the essential role of skilled nursing care centers in caring for America’s frail, elderly, and disabled. This coming May, celebrate all members of your community and participate on social media using the hashtag #NSNCW. Below is a list of general activity ideas taken from the American Health Care Association/ National Center for Assisted Living: NOTE: At the time of publishing, care centers were following social distancing and other restrictions due to COVID-19. Please be sure to plan your activities through an infection prevention and control lens and modify them based on the latest guidelines as needed. Celebrate Together coordinates interactive games and raffles. Decorate and provide food to staff in celebration and appreciation of their efforts. If safe and guidelines allow, invite family members to share a meal with residents. Plan a themed dress-up day or a dance contest and offer prizes. Create Together Engage residents in creative art projects focused on the theme of the four seasons and togetherness. Coordinate a project that allows everyone to participate such as a fingerprint or button tree. Display all artwork in a “gallery” and invite staff members on a “gallery walk”. Reaching Out Together Find ways to connect to the wider community. Ask loved ones, members of the community, and/or local school groups to send feel-good notes, drawings, or video messages for residents and staff. Work with residents to create signs and messages of their own to share with loved ones. Enjoy Music Together Plan a concert or talent show and invite residents and staff with musical talents to share their gifts by playing or singing. Create personalized playlists for residents with dementia through the Music & Memory program. Music is the universal language and a great way to foster connections. https://www.ahcancal.org/Education-Events/Documents/NSNCW/NSNCW_2021_FINAL.pdf?csf=1&e=8EmyYh Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  16. CMS Updates Nursing Home Guidance with Revised Visitation Recommendations The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), issued updated guidance today (March 10, 2021) for nursing homes to safely expand visitation options during the COVID-19 pandemic public health emergency (PHE). This latest guidance comes as more than three million doses of vaccines have been administered within nursing homes, thanks in part to the CDC’s Pharmacy Partnership for Long-Term Care Program, following the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) authorization for emergency use of COVID-19 vaccines. According to the updated guidance, facilities should allow responsible indoor visitation at all times and for all residents, regardless of vaccination status of the resident, or visitor, unless certain scenarios arise that would limit visitation for: Unvaccinated residents, if the COVID-19 county positivity rate is greater than 10 percent and less than 70 percent of residents in the facility are fully vaccinated; Residents with confirmed COVID-19 infection, whether vaccinated or unvaccinated, until they have met the criteria to discontinue transmission-based precautions; or Residents in quarantine, whether vaccinated or unvaccinated, until they have met criteria for release from quarantine. The updated guidance also emphasizes that “compassionate care” visits should be allowed at all times, regardless of a resident’s vaccination status, the county’s COVID-19 positivity rate, or an outbreak. Compassionate care visits include visits for a resident whose health has sharply declined or is experiencing a significant change in circumstances. CMS continues to recommend facilities, residents, and families adhere to the core principles of COVID-19 infection control, including maintaining physical distancing and conducting visits outdoors whenever possible. This continues to be the safest way to prevent the spread of COVID-19, particularly if either party has not been fully vaccinated. “CMS recognizes the psychological, emotional and physical toll that prolonged isolation and separation from family have taken on nursing home residents, and their families,” said Dr. Lee Fleisher, MD, CMS Chief Medical Officer and Director of CMS’ Center for Clinical Standards and Quality. “That is why, now that millions of vaccines have been administered to nursing home residents and staff, and the number of COVID cases in nursing homes has dropped significantly, CMS is updating its visitation guidance to bring more families together safely. This is an important step that we are taking, as we continue to emphasize the importance of maintaining infection prevention practices, given the continued risk of transmission of COVID-19.” High vaccination rates among nursing home residents, and the diligence of committed nursing home staff to adhere to infection control protocols, which are enforced by CMS, have helped significantly reduce COVID-19 positivity rates and the risk of transmission in nursing homes. Although outbreaks increase the risk of COVID-19 transmission, as long as there is evidence that the outbreak is contained to a single unit or separate area of the facility, visitation can still occur. For additional details on the updated nursing home visitation guidance released today, visit here: https://www.cms.gov/medicareprovider-enrollment-and-certificationsurveycertificationgeninfopolicy-and-memos-states-and/nursing-home-visitation-covid-19-revised A Fact Sheet can be found here: https://www.cms.gov/newsroom/fact-sheets/cms-updates-nursing-home-guidance-revised-visitation-recommendations https://www.cms.gov/newsroom/press-releases/cms-updates-nursing-home-guidance-revised-visitation-recommendations Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  17. View this email in your browser The Unsung Hero of Long Term Care Facilities The COVID-19 pandemic has come in like a lion (through infection); ruthlessly and relentlessly devouring the physical well being of the individual from which this disease takes claim. The other less recognized, less publicized, and profoundly less understood yet equally sinister devastation bestowed by this infection is the retaliatory affects of social isolation and other psychological stresses affecting our aging population living in nursing homes during this pandemic. In addition, the sudden onset of COVID-19 has unceremoniously and expeditiously eliminated the once familiar daily routines that residents have come to know and expect. The Challenges The impact of current pandemic related stressors and social isolation cannot be overstated. Facilities have justifiably but abruptly ended group stimulation, social interactions and temporarily paused self-directed choices that have been deemed necessary to reduce high risk infection spread for facility residents and the staff. Long Term Care Facilities’ residents suddenly and unexpectedly find themselves confined to their rooms without social dining, interest based group pursuits, and no longer allowed to have in-person family visits. Emotional disruptions of such magnitude may perpetuate mental health conditions such as, post-traumatic stress (PTSD), depression, loneliness and anxiety that may lead to life-threatening status and failure to thrive. Highly elevated emotional stressors may be detrimental to the functioning of the individuals’ immune system. Additionally, elevated loneliness, anxiety, and unrelenting fears may further lead to a number of deleterious consequences, such as high blood pressure, depression, and suicidal thoughts. The Unsung Heroes Claim Their Place Amongst the tenacious and dedicated nurses, doctors, and therapists is a member of the Interdisciplinary Team that goes unnoticed. These healthcare professionals work day in and day out in the midst of this pandemic to support the emotional health of our elderly population living in Long Term Care facilities. These are the Long Term Care nursing home “Unsung Heroes” of the Covid-19 epidemic. The nursing home Therapeutic Programming Professional takes responsibility for resident “engagement” and partners closely with the other IDT members in the continuum of care dedicated to delivering “whole health and wellness”. These professionals create facility programming intended to support the residents’ emotional well being which in turn, greatly helps to reduces imposed epidemic related stressors. Consequently, leading to better immunity and that is a “golden ticket” with unlimited value. These professionals focus on the residents’ personal interests and individualized needs. They create the pathway for each unique resident so they may continue enjoying the same leisure quality of life interests which they had previously come to treasure during their lifetime. Supporting the residents’ choice to continue enjoying deep roots preferences allows them to continue being connected to their personal identity well into aging years. The Spirit to Succeed One can only imagine the immense challenges brought on by the pandemic social distancing and mask infection control practices or the spirit and tenacity these professionals must draw upon to support and maintain resident connectivity at a time when imposed limitations curtail even the best of those well laid out plans. These programs may help residents spend time constructively, thereby decreasing loneliness and anxiety while maintaining social distancing. In addition, these trained professionals collaborate with the clinical staff and therapists to utilize clinical & psychology approved therapeutic approaches. Here are several suggestions to help reduce social isolation and improve engagement with residents: Non-group or solitary interventions, such as laughter therapy, horticultural therapy, and reminiscence therapy, can be more effective in reducing residents’ feelings of loneliness. Staff have transformed into surrogate family members with frequent and more lengthy contacts. Have them wear photos and name tags on top of their PPE. Regular video chats with family members facilitated by social work and/or therapeutic programming staff is essential. Regular telehealth visits should be provided by doctors and other therapists. Celebratory, fun, and interesting snacks, treats, and programming (e.g., music therapy) can be brought to the door, room, and bedside. Drive-thru family visits to the facility can be set up, using masks and social distancing. Offer in rooms stimulation via video and/or closed-circuit TV. We must remember that ALL front line caregivers are true heroes, facing daily stress that can be overwhelming for the benefit of those they serve. Heartfelt gratitude to every healthcare “Essential Personnel”! Whether in Long Term Care or Hospital Critical Care, it cannot be overstated that family members and close friends lack adequate words, in any language, that will sufficiently convey the level of gratefulness and thankfulness to those devoted nurses, doctors and therapist and Therapeutic Programming Professionals that remain dedicated despite potential exposure and personal risks. From each and everyone one of us! https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/the-impact-of-covid-19-on-mental-health-in-long-term-care-settings Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Buy Now We Proudly Support : Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  18. Subscribe Past Issues RSS Translate Check Out Our Bestsellers National Activity Professional Training Course (NAPT) Our 8 week training course meets APNCC's Continuing Education Requirements for Path 2 and includes up to 12 LIVE CE Hours. This course is designed to prepare you to pass the CMS Approved APNCC National Board Certification exam to become Activity Professional Board Certified (AP-BC). Learn More >> The Activity Directors Bible 2nd Ed. From start to finish this book will help you set up your department to make sure that the department is doing everything it needs to provide the quality of care that each resident requires. $55 Visit Store >> The Care Plan: A Road Map 10 CEs This course takes you through the Activity Departments required documentation process from the Baseline Care Plan through the final creation of the Comprehensive Care Plan. Enroll Now>> Find us online Want to be social with us? Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. view this email in your browser Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC, All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 West Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351 Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
  19. Not only is it the month of LOVE, but it is also Heart Health Month! Today we will focus on some of the ways you can promote heart health in your facility. Below is a great article from Total Wellness Health that incorporates some action steps that you can take within your facility to celebrate. Who knows, one of these action steps just might save someone's life. 5 Ways to Celebrate American Heart Month By Seraine Page Source: TotalWellnessHealth.Com February is American Heart Month, which presents a great opportunity to spread awareness about heart disease throughout the workplace. Every year, heart disease kills 1 in 4 people. Heart disease is also known as coronary heart disease or coronary artery disease. Over time, “plaque” builds up in the arteries that take blood to the heart. What causes plaque? ● Smoking ● High blood pressure ● Too much fat and cholesterol in the blood ● Too much sugar in the blood The great news is this chronic, deadly disease can be avoided when people make healthy lifestyle choices while managing other health conditions. By spreading awareness like heart health facts and the major signs of a heart attack, employers give workers potentially life-saving tools. Hearts will be everywhere in February. Take advantage of all the love talk to circle around to matters of the heart, including a healthy heart. Ready to show some heart love? Here’s 5 ideas to celebrate American Heart Month: 1. Host a Quit Smoking Day Give away gift cards to employees who quit smoking on a designated day in February. It may only be one day, but if an employee is willing to try it, they may continue the trend. Quitting smoking improves breathing, blood pressure, and oxygen levels — all necessities for a healthy heart. Action step: Have employees planning to quit write their names on a bulletin board for the quit smoking day. It will bring staffers together who have a common goal in mind, and it allows accountability partnerships to develop. Encourage non-smokers to write encouraging notes on the board, too. 2. Give Your Heart Away Give away items that are cute and heart-related. A heart-shaped pen or a heart stress ball with a note of attached heart health facts are fun ways to spread awareness. Action step: Send out Valentine’s cards with heart healthy facts to every employee. It’s an affordable and memorable way to share heart disease information. 3. Sweat it Out As an entire staff, dedicate one day a week to workout together for all of February. It’s a short month anyways, so even gym haters can try out working out short-term in the name of a healthier ticker. The habit may even turn into an activity they enjoy instead of loathe. Action step: Ask an employee to coordinate each week’s physical fitness activities. It doesn’t have to be expensive. Head to the local park for a walk, or set up a Stairmaster challenge within your company’s stairwell. 4. Wear Red Raise awareness about heart disease by wearing the color red. Every Friday, have your entire staff wear various shades of red. Action step: To get into the team spirit, have shirts created with facts about heart disease on the back of the T-shirt. If you host a fundraiser to donate proceeds to a foundation like the American Heart Association, wear your shirts during the event to spread additional awareness. 5. Spread the Word The more you share, the more people will learn about heart disease and its lasting impacts on health. Knowledge is power, and the more your employees know, the better off they'll be. Action step: There are plenty of ways to get the word out. Share heart health facts in your monthly newsletter. Use #HeartMonth to tweet about American Heart Month on your company account. Host a cardiologist for a lunch and learn, and provide a heart-healthy meal catered by dieticians. Have a Little Heart to Heart With Employees Serious topics don't have to be boring. Bring some heart to your American Heart Month awareness campaign, and employees are unlikely to forget the importance heart health. All five of the ideas to celebrate American Heart Month above are doable for companies of any size. Early action is critical for heart attack victims, and knowing the warning signs increases the chances of survival when emergency treatment happens fast. By sharing details like warning signs and symptoms and prevention measures, you’ll give your employees information that could one day save their life. Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Checkout these worksheets from Dr. Oz. Hand them out to your residents and co-workers. Information is power. Print Dr. Oz Worksheets Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Buy Now Cinnamon Sweet Tortilla Chips with Fruit Salsa Source: Heart.Org Servings: 8 Serving Size: 6 tortilla chips and ¼ cup salsa Ingredients Cooking spray 2 teaspoons olive oil 12 drops cinnamon-flavored liquid stevia sweetener ½ packet stevia sweetener or ¼ teaspoon stevia sweetner 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon salt 8 6-inch corn tortillas, each cut into 6 wedges 1 medium orange, peeled and diced ½ cup diced mango (from ½ of a medium mango)... Click Button Below to get Full Recipe Heart.Org Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Source: The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk Share Tweet Share Pin Forward Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  20. Recognizing you... National Activity Professionals Week is January 24-30, 2021 National Activity Professionals Day was first celebrated on January 27th, 1984 to recognize all the activity professionals who care and develop interest and needs based programming for active seniors in Long Term Care nursing homes and other elder care facilities all around the country. What is Recognition? Recognition is a means for an organization, business, or specific industry to honor and support the contributions made by an individual or group achievements. It conveys appreciation and acknowledges the undaunted efforts and drive of that individual or group of individuals has not gone unnoticed. Recognition may be bestowed publicly or privately yet the value of this one small mention often matters more than that weekly paycheck. Recognition helps employees build a sense of security in their unique and individualized value to the company; often motivating them to continue their great work. Recognition matters: From a very early age, we crave recognition from parents, teachers, and friends. So strong is our desire for positive affirmation, particularly during developmental periods, that we can even perceive a lack thereof as a negative unspoken message. This continues to hold true as we move into the workplace. Motivated workers put more time and effort into their work, as they feel they have a purpose and play an important role in the company. Employee recognition helps to: Retain top talent thus, reducing staff turnover Increase employee engagement and motivation Elevate and encourage high performance Recognition is especially meaningful this year The Bigger Picture Who could have imagined the level of demand and the overdrive of dedication needed from our healthcare professionals this year? The very nature of the work these professionals commit to, under normal circumstances, is a huge undertaking, but current events have created an unimaginable workload that has caused many of us to forge ahead on autopilot; leaving the trauma to be dealt with at a later date. It’s clear that this infectious disease has created hardships on many levels, whether they are personal, economic, or financially related. Though some industries have experienced lower demand prompting layoffs, the healthcare industry has experienced the opposite problem. Healthcare workers have felt immense strain as increased demand has led to equipment shortages, working overtime, and sacrificed well-being to help those in need. Some healthcare institutions have had an especially rough time. We are now seeing the operations of many long-term care facilities, such as nursing homes and retirement homes, breaking down as outbreaks occur in these institutions. These facilities are home to the most vulnerable - our precious aging population. Indeed it takes a very special soul with immense compassion such that the average human being cannot comprehend. This year, the current pandemic has asked more from these professionals each and every day. So this past week we are reminded to give praise and appreciation to our healthcare professionals diligently working to maintain “infection control” standards while reinventing creative facility programming to optimize the quality of life and well being of the residents they serve. It seems more imperative and especially fitting to recognize these “essential care” professionals in lieu of the very challenging and unprecedented past year. THIS YEAR . . . Recognition is neither about promotional offers nor the variety of exclusive employee appreciation gifts. It’s not about the flowers gift sets, mug gift sets, appreciation treat sets; etcetera, etcetera! Senior care programming professionals have sacrificed personal safety for the sake of those they serve and are rightly claiming their place in the health care industry. Activity professionals have “come into their own” and have made their mark in the industry of healthcare. Activity professionals have faced the current challenges to combat resident loneliness while ensuring cognitive engagement and safety– more than any previous year before. Thank You – Each and every one of you deserve the upmost recognition for your demonstrated dedication, tenacity and determination – you have arrived and have earned your place alongside all your health care counterparts. You have secured your place amongst the clinical staff, therapists, social workers, and physicians that care plan for our unique and individualized residents needs and sit proudly as a member of that elite group of “continuum of care” professionals known as the (IDT) Interdisciplinary Team members. In honor of today's Activity Consultant's Help Desk Topic, we wish to honor our wonderful instructor and author of the Help Desk, M. Celeste Chase. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  21. Send your cards to Village at Sugar Land 140 Eldridge Suite H Sugar land Texas 77478 They will make sure they get passed out and distributed to the community.
  22. Celebrate Christmas Card Day December 9th This is the day to get all those Christmas cards sent off into the world to spread good cheer! You may need to host an activity prior to this to make sure each resident has Christmas cards to send or help them get their cards ordered or purchased. Spend December 9th helping residents fill out, address and mail off their cards. Play Christmas carols, serve a warm festive beverage and Christmas treats, and make a day of it! 48-Pack Christmas Card Bulk Box Set – Holiday Greeting Cards in 6 Cozy Christmas Season’s Greetings Designs with Kraft Envelopes, 4 x 6 Inches Amazon $11.99 Celebrate National Chocolate Covered Anything Day December 16th Time to load up your cart with the good stuff! Everyone loves chocolate, so why not have a little fun with it? On National Chocolate Covered Anything Day, you can create a cart with many food items dipped in chocolate. This works perfectly for food items that you may already have on hand. Below is list of possibilities. Pick what makes the most sense for you, your residents, your budget and your setup. Be sure you serve some milk on the side! Chocolate Covered Possibilities: Peanut Butter Crackers Nutter Butters Oreos Apple Wedges Sweet Potato Chips Strawberries Banana Slice Nuts Churros Pretzels Popcorn Candied Fruit Waffles Variations*: If you have adventurous residents, you may want to create a cart full of unusual chocolate covered food items from around the world. Check out the paraphrased article below for some wacky ideas. 20 Most Unusual Chocolate-Covered Foods From Around The World By Joey Haverford Aug 09, 2018 Source: TheTravel.Com 20. Squid- Chocolate and salty seafood is a tough sell, but it sells just the same! 19. Worms- Served in quite a few places around the world. 18. Onions- Served in Philadelphia candy shops. 17. Slim Jims- This has a small following, mostly limited to Slim Jim aficionados. 16. Lemons- Cherries and strawberries are among the most popular chocolate covered foods int eh world. Lemon is considered one of the most bizarre fruits to dip. 15. Cheerios- One of the tastier options on the list. 14. Chickpeas- This chocolate covered healthy snack is fast becoming more and more popular around the world. 13. Seaweed- This is sold in Korea, but isn't very popular other places. 12. Mushrooms- Created by Justin Cournoyer, a Toronto chef. 11. Bacon- Chocolate covered bacon is one of the top unique food items offered. 10. Carrots- Carrots are on the sweeter side, making them a better fit than most other veggies. 9. Scorpions- Multiple places all over the world serves these as an unusual snack. 8. Edamame- This snack is growing in popularity among healthy eaters. 7. Pickles- Typically on a stick while dipped into chocolate and covered with sprinkles. 6. Potato Chips- Seems like a snack food match made in heaven. 5. Crickets- Believed to be a great source of protein more sustainable than beef or pork. Like scorpions, these are eaten around the world. 4. Broccoli- Broccoli is often being coated in things to make it tastier. Chocolate is one of the wildest ideas out there for it. 3. Cheetos- May not be a huge hit, but recipes are out there for the creative food types. 2. Jalapenos- A combination of a super spicy item and a super sweet item could lead to a horrible result. Proceed with cation. 1. Corn dogs- Likely invented at a carnival or fair. Read Full Article Borden's Egg Nog Ad Circa December 28th, 1954 Celebrate National Egg Nog Day December 24th Enroll Now! ENROLL NOW! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  23. Top 5 Stress Relief Games in 2020 Posted by Yana Yelina | Apr 15, 2020 Source: Mental Health Matters You certainly feel stressed from time to time: negative emotions and fatigue quite often come while you’re at work, and it seems really difficult to get rid of them, distract, and relax a little bit. To provide some examples, 80% of workers are stressed while managing their daily activities (especially those in the USA and China), and almost half admits they need aid in reducing stress and anxiety. Beyond that, according to the statistics, 75% of adults encounter moderate or high levels of stress during few months, with 1 out of 75 persons experiencing panic disorder. Stress is also a top health concern for US and Australian teens. There are several ways to cope with stress from reading a book to yoga. This article explains how you can use stress relief games to help manage your stress. 1. Bubble Wrap Bubble Wrap is a great game for reducing stress. Bubble wrap popping beloved by many people is now available virtually. Just press the bubbles with fingers and make them explode, thus, getting rid of destructive emotions. This free mobile app is also a time killer: you can play it while waiting in a queue or during a long and tiring trip. There’s an option to pop bubbles as long as you desire, or opt for a mini-game (Blitz Pop: the number of bubbles popped within a minute; Pop 500: the speed at which you pop 500 bubbles; Pop All: how fast you’ll be able to pop the whole sheet that includes 2,000 bubbles). The app offers a range of colors, pleasant sounds and allows users to change the bubble size. 2. Color Break Color Break grants a marvelous opportunity to relax and make fun. Try digital painting using your fingertips or stylus and relish an amazing variety of patterns. This app will help to encourage your creativity and forget about a tough day. This stress reliever game boasts an unlimited number of colors and lets users share finished works with friends via emails. This is a great “quiet” game that you can play at work without drawing too much attention your way! 3. Personal Zen Personal Zen is another game for handling stress and anxiety. The app was created with the assistance of neuroscientists, and it’s clinically proven to help people to battle painful emotions and exercise the brain for better wellness. Researchers say it is a bright idea to play Personal Zen a couple of times a week for about 5-10 minutes. However, the longer you play, the better influence on your well-being you experience. Furthermore, the game trains your brain so that you can concentrate on positive things in your life and throw away negatives. Just accurately follow the path of a friendly sprite on the screen without allowing the evil one to distract you. Mediavine 4. Paper Toss Paper Toss is a nice app to use during a break at work. Whenever you feel exhausted and need to relax, take a crumpled piece of paper to make it in a trash basket on your mobile phone. The game offers an automatic count of balls that reached the target, 7 levels of difficulty, stunning graphics, great flick control, natural sounds at the office with comments from angry co-workers, varying speed of the paper flight, and more. So, feel free to have a short break and rest with the Paper Toss app. 5. Relaxing Puzzler Relaxing Puzzler represents a meditative puzzle game with which you’ll be able to take your time and have a rest. Hypnotic soundtracks by Winterpark will give you an opportunity to meditate and reach the state of serenity without noticing the change. The app, inspired by meditative art styles, is easy to use: you just guide the energy by moving rocks around the mystic garden and relax to the full. Read Full Article This pandemic has been incredibly hard for our world. It hit like a ton of bricks and has lasted a great deal of time. It may even seem to most of us that it will never end. The truth is, our world has survived many events that were similar in a lot of ways. In this case, the 1918 Pandemic parallels the struggles that we are facing now. Thankfully, we have made great advancements in our knowledge, skill and understanding and that offers us some relief and tools that were not present in 1918. However, the fear, emotion and disbelief were the same for the people experiencing these events as they are for us. We are never alone in our experiences the way we tend to sometimes feel. The NY Times gathered some excerpts from survivors of the 1918 Pandemic and their insights and thoughts echo much of what can be heard today during this Covid 19 Pandemic. While it is devastating to endure, perhaps we can take heart in the fact that others have gone before us and have come out the other side. Things are ever changing and while this may feel permanent, it will eventually morph into something different. Things will eventfully settle and security will return one day. Below are some of the excerpts from the NY TImes article for you to read and even share with your residents. The full article is linked below it. Memories of the 1918 Pandemic From Those Who Survived Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/04/us/spanish-flu-oral-history.html Nearly everyone who survived the 1918 flu pandemic, which claimed at least half a million American lives, has since died. But their memories, preserved in oral history interviews, shed light on its indelible impact. Bustling major cities and rural towns were brought to their knees, as transportation, law enforcement, commerce and civic life were wiped out. On the scale of death “They were stacked up in the cemetery and they couldn’t bury them. I was living on 31st Street. then. And that was a two-way street then, you know, and it’s one-way now. But people that died over this way had to be buried over this way and they used to have a funeral procession coming this way. And they used to be crossing. You had, they had to come to this bridge, coming one way or the other. And people would be there. And I would be laying in there and I says, I looked out the window and says, ‘There are two funeral processions. One going one way and one going the other way meeting like that.’ And that’s the way it was. There wasn’t a lot of comforts in those days. But it didn’t worry me. I was taking care of myself. What I mean, I wasn’t thinking about it. I wasn’t knowing whether I was going to die or what. I was just figuring it’s got me, and everything else is going on.” — Clifford Adams, Philadelphia, 1984 On fear of the contagion “That was the roughest time ever. Like I say, people would come up and look in your window and holler and see if you was still alive, is about all. They wouldn’t come in.” — Glenn Holler, Conover, N.C., 1980 On the human cost “They were dying — many families losing one or more in their family. It was getting so bad, the deaths, they even, they had to use wagons drawn by two horses to carry people to the grave. I remember seeing them past the house, seems like to me now it was every day. … At that time, when the phone would ring, when my mother or my father wanted to listen in, and they would turn to us, and they would name the person they just heard had died. It was night and day that you would hear about these people dying. My father never got the flu but he would go to town and buy groceries for the neighbors and take it to the front porch. And we didn’t get the flu at all in our family, but it was terrible.” — Robert McKinney Martin Jr., 1996 Read Full Article You are what you eat. Scientists have fast been connecting nutritional intake and food sensitivities with mental illnesses and behavioral issues. There is no way around it, what you fuel your body with needs to be clean and recognized as real food. This is especially important during times of great stress or when a strong immune system is pertinent. If stress is not managed, it may wreck havoc on your health down the road in the form of physical symptoms. According to Eating Well, there are a several foods you should consider throwing into your diet, and perhaps your food cart, that can specifically help with stress relief. 7 Foods for Stress Relief Source: Eating Well Stress can take a toll on your body’s natural defenses, but eating the right foods can offer relief. 1. Snack on Nuts 2. Add in Red Peppers 3. Serve Salmon Twice a Week 4. Bust Out the Spinach 5. Fill Up on Oatmeal 6. Indulge in Dark Chocolate 7. Sip Tea Read Full Article Activity Starter Create a Tea Cart with a variety of stress relieving teas and some dark chocolate. Pick approximately 3 different tea types and provide disposable cups, hot water, honey and lemon slices. Some good stress relieving teas are: Chamomile Lavender Peppermint *Kava (*this one has one of the strongest sedative effects.) Passionflower The Stress Diet This diet is designed to help you cope with the stress that builds during the day. Breakfast ½ grapefruit 1 slice whole wheat toast (dry) 8 oz. skim milk Lunch 4 oz. lean broiled chicken breast 1 c. steamed spinach 1 c. herb tea 1 Oreo cookie Mid-afternoon snack Rest of Oreos in the package 2 pints Rocky Road ice cream 1 jar hot fudge sauce Nuts, cherries, whipped cream Dinner 2 loaves Garlic Bread with cheese Large deluxe pizza 1 large pitcher of Beer 3 Milky Way candy bars Late evening snack Entire frozen cheesecake (eaten from freezer) Rules for this Diet: If you eat something and no one sees you eat it, it has no calories. If you drink a diet soda with a candy bar, the calories in the candy are cancelled out by the diet soda When you eat with someone else, calories don’t count, if you don’t eat more than they do. Food used for medicinal purposes never count, such as hot chocolate, brandy, toast and cheesecake. If you fatten up everyone else around you, then you look thinner. Movie-related foods, such as Milk Duds, buttered popcorn, Junior mints, Red Hots, and Tootsie Rolls, do not have additional calories because they are part of the entire entertainment package and are not part of one’s personal fuel. Cookie pieces contain no calories. The process of breakage causes calorie leakage. Things licked off knives and spoons have no calories if you are in the process of preparing something. Foods that are the same color have the same number of calories, Examples: spinach and pistachio ice cream; mushrooms and white chocolate. Note: chocolate is a universal color and may be substituted for any other food color. - Author Unknown Courtesy of: Allison Bennett, AD-TXC Enroll Now Over 90 Graduates last Month - NAAPCC.net "The Most Trusted Credentialing Body in the Industry." Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  24. The Introduction- Meeting Your Resident There is a skill in the art of introducing oneself and every healthcare professional must possess well practiced expertise in this area. The very essence of successful wellness care relies on this ability. This first meet and greet frequently establishes the baseline from which “trust” is built and that’s a seriously powerful tool for those wishing to care for others. You will find yourself doing this introduction repeatedly throughout your workday, and this one action will either hamper your relationship with those you serve or greatly lead to open and trusting exchange. Here are a few reminders about how to introduce yourself to your resident. Use your first and last name. You may wear a name badge to help participants remember your name until they become familiar with you. Even if your resident has short-term-memory issues, he/she will understand and appreciate this small formality. Call your resident by Mr./Mrs. and their last name as well. Those wishing you to use their first names or last name only will tell you so or may announce a preferred nickname. Endearing terms are NOT permissible. Avoid using terms like “sweetie” or “dear” remind yourself that these are very grown up adults; such terms are offensive and patronizing. Use a relaxed and friendly tone of voice. This will help establish a relaxed conversation. In addition, a relaxed tone will also serve to increase the residents’ confidence in your abilities. Keep the volume of your voice at a regular level unless it becomes evident that he/she is having difficulty hearing you. Remember that your “body language” will say more than words. Body language is the physical clue that we use often without thinking. Some examples of positive body language are smiling, a touch, nodding and making eye contact with the person who is talking. Examples of body language that express displeasure are frowning, raising an eyebrow and folding our arms over our chest. Body language should match what you are saying. Even people with severe memory problems who have difficulty understanding what you say, can still “read” your body language. Establish eye contact. This means looking at the person to whom you are talking. Eye contact tells the other person you are listening and that you mean what you are saying. Directly face the resident when you speak and get to his/her level (if they are sitting, sit down next to them). Keep in mind, however, and respect different cultural backgrounds and the possibility that they may interpret direct eye contact differently. It can be viewed as confrontational or authoritative posture – know this about your resident. Many older people have difficulty hearing and unconsciously rely on “lip-reading” to understand what others are saying. Never shout; it raises the pitch of your voice. Many older people lose the ability to hear high-pitched sounds. That is why many older people tell you they can understand a man’s voice better than a woman’s voice. Listening is extremely important. It is often more important to “zip your lip” and focus on what the other person is trying to tell you than it is to speak. It takes older people longer to react than the younger ones. Give older people plenty of time to respond to your questions/comments, never make them feel that time is of the essence. Communication is important in all interactions and it is the bridge to successfully learning the wants and needs of your resident. From introductions to day-to-day communication, you will establish a trusting relationship with each resident that forms mutual respect that dissipates the residents’ hesitation and opens the door for you to become his/her champion. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Enroll Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  25. Infection Prevention and Control Assessment Tool for Nursing Homes Preparing for COVID-19 There is never an issue of too much information or repeated redundancy of information when it comes to the current pandemic [COVID-19]. Take a moment to review these CDC overview guidance published May 8, 2020. CDC provides the much needed up to date research and educational materials on the topic – visit: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/assessment-tool-for-nursing-homes.html CDC’s COVID-19 Infection Control Assessment and Response (ICAR) tool was developed to help nursing homes prepare for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Nursing homes and other long-term care facilities can take steps to assess and improve their preparedness for responding to COVID-19. This ICAR tool should be used as one tool to develop a comprehensive COVID-19 response plan. This tool may also contain content relevant for assisted living facilities. Health departments can use this tool to assess infection prevention practices and guide quality improvement activities (e.g., by addressing identified gaps). This tool may be used for remote (e.g., by telephone or video chat) or onsite assessment. This tool may also be used by healthcare facilities to conduct internal quality improvement audits. ICAR Items assessed in the ICAR support the key strategies of: Keeping COVID-19 out of the facility Identifying infections as early as possible Preventing spread of COVID-19 in the facility Assessing and optimizing personal protective equipment (PPE) supplies Identifying and managing severe illness in residents with COVID-19 Areas assessed in the ICAR include: Visitor restriction (HCP)[ 1 ]Education, monitoring, and screening of healthcare personnel Education, monitoring, and screening of residents Ensuring availability of PPE and other supplies Ensuring adherence to recommended infection prevention and control (IPC) practices Communicating with the health department and other healthcare facilities Health care personnel (HCP) are defined as paid and unpaid persons serving in health care settings who have the potential for direct or indirect exposure to patients or infectious materials. The following link takes you to CDC published guidelines for Infection Prevention and Control Assessment Tool. This is an infection control assessment and response tool (ICAR) that can be used to help nursing homes prepare for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This tool may also contain content relevant for assisted living facilities. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/hcp/assessment-tool-nursing-homes.pdf We wish to thank you for caring for our elderly population and for unselfishly dedicating yourself as essential personnel on the front lines each and every day, particularly during today’s current challenges - you are truly making a “world” of difference. . . With heartfelt gratitude from all those you serve and their loved ones! Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org This course will provide the Activity Director with the reasons that fostering inter-generational relationships are so beneficial for both younger and older populations. At one time families lived close to one another and developed deep relationships. In this course I will provide background on family traditions and help you to understand the importance of keeping younger and older people connected. Spending time with each other, being involved with each other’s activities, and showing love for one another gives each group a reason to live more fulfilling lives. Small children bring joy and delight to the elderly just by being in their presence. When teens and young adults listen to and appreciate the elderly reminiscing about life experiences it gives the elderly a feeling of significance. Many examples of existing intergenerational programs, ideas for group activities, 1-to-1 activities including family history discussion questions, arts and crafts projects, and educational activities are included in this course. Just remember we walk along the path of life together and that is what we want our younger and older population to do. Workshop Objectives: Upon completion the student will understand how intergenerational relationships benefit both young and old. The student will understand the importance of implementing programming that creates social connections between residents and children, teens, and young adults through activities. Upon completion the student will have many new ideas that will inspire them to start their own intergenerational program in their facility or in the community. The student will have a variety of activities, projects, and educational materials that may be incorporated directly into their activity programming. Workshop Content: Family Traditions of the Past Where We are Today Preschools within Nursing Homes Intergenerational Programs for Nursing Homes Intergenerational Programs in the Community Group Activities 1-to-1 Activities Arts and Crafts Projects Educational Activities Resources ENROLL Now Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
×
  • Create New...