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  2. Make a Difference Day October 26, 2019 by M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP This day is an unofficial secular holiday or observance focused on community service and volunteer efforts. Traditionally celebrated on the fourth Saturday in October since 1992. All across the United States volunteers perform projects for their community, for individuals in need and a number of charitable organizations. This October 26th millions of volunteers will come together to honor “Make a Difference Day.” This day is observed as one of the largest and most widely recognized days for community service efforts. Volunteers actively engage in environmental tasks, charity fund raising such as bake sales local food banks, donate their time to nursing homes and women’s safe haven centers, and a host of many other activities. Not only to celebrate but to create awareness that people can truly make a difference when joining forces with actions to improve the quality of life for so many individuals. One of the most rewarding things about “Make a Difference Day” is that it matters not the volunteer age or background, we can all help others. We can give back to the communities and profoundly change the world. Senior Volunteer Programs do Making a Difference Older adults participating in volunteer programs will find it extremely rewarding on a number of levels. While there are a variety of groups and places the older adult can choose to support, the choice is often based more so on becoming involved in something that allows the volunteer to feel useful once again. The rewards gained from acceptance while volunteering to help others is immeasurable and as a whole, the wise elder appreciates and benefits tremendously from the experience. Whether it’s within their own nursing home, community center, adult day health center, or assisted living facility there are so many avenues and opportunities for older adults to really “make a difference” through volunteer services. Note: Adults over the age of 55 comprised nearly 36% of the 62.6 million volunteers, with 10% of the volunteers being 75 years old or older. https://www.leisurecare.com/resources/benefits-of-volunteering-seniors/ Volunteering Benefits Volunteering has important emotional and physical health benefits for the volunteer – especially when that volunteer happens to be an older adult. Depending on availability of time and the level of energy your resident possesses, you will find plenty of ways for seniors to experience the benefits from volunteering opportunities. Here’s a list of just a few possibilities and their respective benefits: Children - Teach them well. We all know that seniors are great stories tellers. Pair your residents up with youngsters by holding an Intergenerational Program. Seniors can volunteer during story hour and tell the little ones about history because they’ve lived through it firsthand. Who does not love to hear wonderful accounts of days of the past filled with curiosity and adventure? Additionally, children whom otherwise may not have previous experience with elders will learn to accept those imperfections that come with aging and come to respect and value the elder’s wisdom. Pay It Forward – The resident as a student then becomes the teacher. Plan to kick leisure pursuits up a notch by creating a “resident to resident volunteer program.” This would be one to one or small groups. Encourage those elders that have learned new found skills in technology, crafting, cooking, etc. to share what they have learned with their fellow residents. It is an opportunity for your resident to pay it forward. This is a dual benefiting experience both for the resident sharing knowledge and the resident learning something new. The added bonus it that it makes way for wonderful resident friendships. Supporting the Community - Volunteering for organizations and services gets seniors out into the community and is a great way to instill a sense of purpose and responsibility while also encouraging social engagement and friendships. A recent study of adults over the age of 60 who volunteer reported higher levels of well-being and lower disability than those who did not volunteer. Note: Current regulations specify that community involvement opportunities must be in place within senior care facilities. Where Seniors can Volunteer If you want to volunteer with seniors you can contact a number of services and programs within your local area. If you’re not sure where to go there are many organizations that can help you find a place where your older adults’ services are needed. Here’s a look at some to contact: Elder Helpers National Council on Aging AARP Volunteer Match Volunteers of America Meals on Wheels One Foster Grandparent's Rebound Anna Nelson, 70, a Foster Grandparent volunteer with five- and six-year-olds in Knoxville, Tenn., for the past three years, can attest to the study’s results. “I’m not depressed anymore. My blood pressure has come down. My blood work is now normal. My cholesterol level is down,” said Nelson, one of 500 Senior Corps volunteers in Knoxville. In addition, Nelson said, “I’ve lost weight from being more active with the kids. They get me moving.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2019/03/12/the-volunteering-that-makes-people-55-healthier/#7672e1cde5e8 Note: According to the Corporation for National Community & Service, the most common forms of volunteering are: Collecting, serving, preparing, or distributing food Fundraising or selling items to raise money Engaging in general labor, like helping build homes or clean up parks Tutoring or teaching Mentoring the youth Collecting, making, or distributing clothing No matter if it’s walking dogs at the local Humane Society, building a home for Habitat for Humanity or restocking books at the local library, volunteering keeps seniors physically active. Maintaining physical fitness and an active lifestyle can prevent a number of injuries and prevent or delay the onset of some diseases. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org BUY Now Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  3. Hello Fellow Activity Directors, We have noticed an increase in falls at our building during the late afternoon early evening before dinner time. I am looking for ideas to help keep our resident occupied during this time. Our schedule is usually pretty full already but I was thinking of maybe having two different activities at the same time to capture more participation from more of the residents. Any ideas are appreciated. Thanks
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  5. What’s The Difference Between Adult Day Centers? Alzheimer’s and dementia care facilities Socialization and safety centers Medical, therapy and socialization centers Adult Day Centers are either social or medical in nature with a specifically trained and compassionate staff that creates programs to meet the needs, preferences and cultural differences of those they serve. These facilities offer supportive assistance by way of physical activities and cognitive stimulation and/ or medical care during the day-time hours (no overnight stays). Family members can plan for daily “predictable respite” for which they might use to relax or go to work or run necessary errands (without the added burden of taking their senior loved ones with them). When participants go home to be with their families after a day at the center, families will find their loved ones happy, stimulated, alert and often more ready to sleep soundly through the night. This provides the entire family with a most welcomed nighttime benefit which is often desperately needed. Without a doubt adult day health programming leads to improved well-being and increased socialization within a safe, nurturing and comfortable community setting. Medical vs. Social - There are two types of adult day care: Both provide a comfortable, secure place for a senior to reside during the day, enabling them to socialize, stay active, remain productive and enjoy an improved quality of life. Typically, the center provides one or two meals a day. Some centers provide transportation for pick up and/or drop off, which may or may not be included in the cost. The main difference between medical and social day care is that the medical model also provides an array of medical professionals, which may include on-site registered nurses, speech therapists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, social workers and registered dietitians. NOTE: The easiest way to identify the difference between these two centers is to take a look at the name. An “adult day care” facility, without the word “health” in the title is not required to adhere to the same standards and regulations and do not offer the availability of on-site health care professionals from a range of disciplines to provide clinical oversight. Adult Day Centers and Offerings Socialization and safety centers – Adult Day Care Adult Day Care centers generally have well-trained activity specialists who lead dynamic activities programs. These programs might include arts and crafts, intergenerational programs, music, cooking classes, exercise sessions, movies, discussion groups, live entertainment and trips into the community. Some care centers offer programs that are especially designed for physically frail individuals with special medical needs such as diabetes, hypertension and post-stroke disabilities, and those with mental health challenges such as dementia, confusion and Alzheimer's disease. The goal is to be an extension of the home environment with caring, personalized service. These centers rely on private pay reimbursement for services provided. Medical, therapy and socialization centers – Adult Day Health Adult Day Health centers offer all of the same services you would find in Adult Day Care centers mentioned above, in addition; they provide ” certified” amenities via trained health care professionals such as physical, occupational and speech therapies, nursing services, personal care, social services and much more depending on the individuals acuity level assessment. These centers are prepared and well equipped to enroll not only very independent individuals but also those with chronic physical illness and/or cognitively challenging needs. Most states have specific governing bodies that work to establish procedures for licensing and regulation standards to oversee the business of Adult Day Health “medical” care centers. These regulations are mandated and centers are required to adhere to guidelines and protocols to be given licensing privileges. These standards are not only specific to medical record guidelines but are also required for the centers to qualify to submit billing to Medicaid and/or Medicare for reimbursement of services on behalf of those participants pre-approved to receive these benefits. Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care centers – may be found in either social or medical model centers (medical facilities usually provide for more advanced stages of the disease). Alzheimer's and Dementia Care centers provide care for patients that are at a heightened risk for safety and cannot be left unsupervised. Progressive memory and cognitive decline may lead to potential for wandering and risk for self harm from misuse of everyday regular household items. This puts family caregivers in a difficult position, especially if outside help is scarce and/or family members are still working. Dementia programs at adult day centers typically utilize security features to prevent wandering as well as improved staffing ratios to ensure seniors are safe and their needs are met in a timely manner. This provides invaluable free time and peace of mind for the dementia caregivers. Skilled Adult day centers that specialize in the care of those with dementia are becoming more and more in demand in light of the increased numbers of seniors diagnosed with this disease over the past few years. Many states require centers to have staff members obtain specific dementia training to care for this population. Trained professionals are able to recognize those seniors that prefer quiet, solitude like environment while others are in desperate need of more stimulation. This expertise proactively minimizes potential disruptive behavior by addressing each individual’s unique needs. State regulations have been written to target this topic requiring medication management to modify behavior to be used only as the last option after it is documented that all non-pharmaceutical interventions have been implemented without success through the individualized care plan. In Conclusion... Adult Day centers provide an array of activities for attendees to participate in; adapted to each person’s unique abilities to maximize enjoyment and minimize frustration. Many centers also offer flexible scheduling choices from attending just a few hours each day to attending the entire day for one or more days per week. The affordable cost of care for Adult Day allows these centers to be more accessible to a wide range of families for senior care options. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Introducing a NEW course from Best-Selling Teacher Kathy Hughes, ADC... ENROLL Now Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  6. Avoid Aging Parents Becoming A Burden By Linda LaPointe, MRA By not planning for the future we guarantee that we will leave our children with a tremendous burden. Just about the time they are preparing for their own retirement and their children's college education, adult children often are overwhelmed with decision-making for their aging parents. As a long term care administrator I heard it daily, I Dont want to be a burden to my children. But unintentionally most of us make it even harder for our children by not clearly defining our wishes or preferences. We can help them out by asserting control over our future health care, residential choices, and even how we will die. There are specific and discrete steps we can take to shape our own destiny. Many of these tasks only take a few moments of your time, some take a little research and others may require professional assistance. None of them are extremely costly or difficult. So why don't more of us do this type of planning? Seniors are concerned about losing control of their life and being a burden to their grown children but many just don't know what to do. For instance, the majority of people want to die at home, but very few do. Become familiar with your options and make your preferences known while thinking clearly, while free from pain and prior to an emergency or crisis. The loss of a parent is difficult enough for an adult child. We can save them additional grief by doing the following, clean house: get rid of all the worthless clutter and unimportant stuff prepare and organize those important papers and throw out the unimportant ones prepare advance directives and tell others what they contain and where they are located make our own funeral plans and ensure there are sufficient funds to pay for it leave our legacy through writings, photo albums, heirloom assignment and recording of family stories You can avoid becoming a burden to your children by taking control of your end of life with as much care, intent and forethought as you have lived the rest of your life. Linda LaPointe, MRA is an ElderLife Matters coach and author of several products to assist families experiencing aging including the pamphlet, Don't Be a Burden: 100 Tips. Get free articles and information at http://www.sospueblo.com/
  7. Let's Get Serious About the Nursing Home Tour Tammy Gonzales, Life Coach Before you tour your facility choices be sure you have done your homework. Go online and visit http://medicare.gov Medicare.gov. They have wonderful resources available to you for free. They are user friendly. Please see the end of this article for details. To narrow down your choice between two or three nursing homes or just considering the only available nursing home to place your family member or friend, it takes two visits. Take someone with you and if at all possible take the person who will be moving into the nursing home. Your first visit to the nursing home is what I call "Their Pitch". Set it up for the morning anytime before 11:00 AM on a Saturday and plan to be there at least an hour. Get there 15 to 20 minutes early with a magazine or a newspaper and let the receptionist know you are there. Take a seat in the lobby and wait. This is not wasted time. Open up your newspaper or magazine and eaves drop without calling attention to yourself. Let your senses lead the way. Have you been offered refreshments? Does the facility smell? Does the interaction of others sound pleasant? When you opened the front door into the nursing home did you smell urine, bowel movement, vomit or body odor? Did it to smell like flowers or antiseptic? Or like bad odors are being covered up by good odors. Broccoli, cabbage and brussel sprouts are the only offensive smells that come from the kitchen when they are being prepared. After a short while close up your magazine or paper and receptive to your visual surroundings. If there is someone else sitting there try to start a conversation about the nursing home and find out what they think. Listen to the tone of their voice, watch facial expression and body language. By now the admissions coordinator or someone is going to invite you into their office or take you for a tour and give you "The. When they take you into the office they are going to ask you questions. Names, name of potential resident, age, diagnosis, who their doctor is, where are they now, do they have Medicare, insurance, are you the health care power of attorney, do they have a living will, have you applied for assistance, how soon do you plan to place them here, etc. They are going to try to emotional connect with you as well. They are looking for potential problems too. Pleasantly answer their questions. If you have a few questions ask and be sure to ask if you can have a copy of an information packet or pre-admission packet. So on to the tour. The tour is about showing you the best of what they have to offer. They will introduce you to everyone and show you the facility. Let "Their Pitch" happen and go along with it. Don't ask too many questions now because you will distract yourself from observations that you need in order to make a sound choice. During the tour you will be introduced to the different department managers and shown their offices. You won't be expected to remember names and it is more important how they respond and take an interest in you. Also, during this tour pay attention to the interaction between staff and residents in every area you are toured through. This is important. Observe the residents. Are their clothes clean and in good repair? Are they wearing footwear? Do the men look clean and shaved? Does their hair look cared for or is it a mess? Do the women have appropriate hairstyles (I have seen them put pigtails on top of balding 90 year olds)? Do they still have bibs on from their last meal? Does any one look cold and not have a sweater? Do you see a number of residents that are wet or smell of urine or BM? Do the hands look clean especially under the nails? Do the wheel chairs look clean and cared for with no sharp edges or tatters? Do the residents in wheel chairs look comfortable? Are residents in wheel chairs being pushed too fast or backwards? Are residents that are being walked rushed or are they allowed to walk at their own pace? Is a resident yelling out the whole time you are there? The flooring should be clean and free from any debris. The walls should be clean. The lighting should be good. Carpets free from spots. Decorative items should look well kept. Drapery should be open to allow the natural sunlight in. You will be taken to the nurse's station. The nurses should be pleasant and responsive to the residents and family members. Listen to their tone and responsiveness in their voice. Watch their body language as they acknowledge you or others at the nursing station. Is this representative of how you would like your loved one to be responded to? One area you will be taken to, will be the Rehabilitation area where physical, occupational and speech therapies are provided. How are the therapists interacting with the residents? Are there residents in the area alone? Is privacy being respected? Is it busy with activity or is no one there? Listen to find out if they have at least a full-time physical therapist and occupational therapist, it is important to know, as your loved one may require these services from time to time. Do they mention at least a part time speech-language pathologist? It is always good to have one available to screen your loved one if they ever begin to have speech problems or eating problems like swallowing. Once at the Activities Department, observe what is going on each time you pass by. Make it a point to stop for a few minutes and observe residents and don't be surprised if not every resident in the activities room, is not doing something. Are at least 25% of the residents doing something like reading, watching TV, or doing the activity that is going on at the time? Ask to see or have a copy of the activities calendar. Observe interactions. The dining areas are a very important area to make observations. Check to see if they have more that one dining room or area? If the nursing home that you are at has 120 beds and is not specific to only Alzheimers/dementia residents, then there is a mix of residents functioning at different levels. There are usually three functional levels of dining: residents that can dine independently, residents that require cueing, and residents that need to be fed. Observe for the different types of dinning rooms or areas. If residents are dining observe for a few moments. Are they socializing, smiling, having a difficult time with the food? This is important because as your loved ones functional ability may decline and they may need cueing or to be fed from time to time. What is the facilities policy about residents dining in their room? The tour guide (admissions coordinator) will show you a few resident rooms. Most of the time they will show you the rooms of clean, fairly independent, and continent residents with good family support, a well decorated room, not the room they would be admitting your loved one into. Facilities are limited to the number of private rooms they have. Most of the rooms are semi private with a private bathroom for the two sharing the room or a bathroom that is shared with the adjoining room. Look in the bathroom if you can. There is much to consider. During the tour they will hopefully show you outdoor areas for the residents. Is it shaded from the sun? Is it partially protected from the weather like rain, snow, and wind? Do they have an area outdoors for residents who smoke? Are there seating areas? Is it visually appealing? This is usually what happens during "Their Pitch". They ask you for information and you ask questions and make observations. Just like when you are with a salesman they want you to get emotionally connected with their facility. At the closing be sure to thank them for their time and let them know that you will be in touch with them soon. Before your second visit, try and read the information related specifically to the nursing home and what their expectations are of you and the resident from the information packet or a pre-admission packet you received. Then make a list of questions for the next visit. If you can't think of any questions, Medicare's publication Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home has questions on several pages that you can tear out and take along with you to what I call the YOUR Q&A VISIT. Try to make YOUR Q&A VISIT unexpected on a weekday. Ask to speak to the admissions coordinator or some one who can answer some questions that came up. I will just tell you now, that if they respond timely to you at this visit that's how you will be responded to if your family member was in the nursing home. This is your opportunity to get your questions answered and to get any additional information that will help you make the best choice. If you live in a small town this nursing home may be your only choice and you will learn to be a good advocate. However, if you live in a large town or metropolitan area you will have a choice of several nursing homes, pick the one that suits your loved ones needs and not your convenience. I wish you the best of luck on your search. Thank you. Here are the valuable Resource Links that I promised. Just click on the title. http://www.medicare.gov/NHCompare/Include/DataSection/Questions/SearchCriteria.asp "Home Health Compare“ Will provide you data about home health agencies most recent survey and compare it to others you select for free. http://www.medicare.gov/HHCompare/Home.asp "Long-Term Care Counselor" Will help you make a determination of the type care and where the care can best be provided for you or for some that needs help or supervision. http://www.medicare.gov/LongTermCare/Static/LTCCounselor.asp Publications - Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home, Medicare and You 2020, Medicare Coverage & Skilled Nursing Facility Care http://www.medicare.gov/Publications/Search/SearchCriteria.asp Tammy Gonzales, Life Coach specializing in family and professional caregivers, the elderly, patients, survivors, those facing crisis and the end of life. Copyright © 2020 RevitaLife Coaching & Consulting, LLC Her current project, Caregiver& Aging Awareness Campaign is to provide all caregivers and the aging with useful information and direct them to the resources of free available information to complete their life planning. http://www.revitalifecoaching.com tammy@revitalifecoaching.com
  8. Bingo Is Not Just A Game! By Jerry Lynn Daniels, ADC/ALF/MC/AD/EDU, CDP ** Article describing Bingo as an assessment tool. Food for Thought ** Bingo is very popular in geriatric recreational programming. It is the most requested activity in most seniors facilities or communities. Activity Professionals for years have heard the dreaded "all you do is play bingo all day" from co-workers, friends and family alike. Bingo is not all they do but it is a very important part of their jobs. Although it is at times dreaded by professional caregivers, it should remain a part of recreational programming because of it obvious entertainment value. And of course we know if it were removed it could cause a revolt. There is a not-so-obvious reason as well. Therapists, nurses, social workers, friends, families as well as activities professionals should learn to use bingo as an assessment tool. The best part is that there are no fancy, expensive assessment packages to purchase. You use an activity which is already taking place. --------------------------------------------- Bingo can be used to assess a persons level of function in certain areas such as these: Hearing. It will become obvious if someone is constantly asking that the numbers be recalled. or if a person who normally sits at the back of the room all of a sudden asks to sit closer to the caller. Visual cards may be required. Sight. You may observe a person straining their neck or eyes. They may be leaning in closer to the card or may have many called numbers still uncovered. Speech. A person must be able to yell "bingo" but must also be able to call out there numbers once they have won the game. Cognition. A person may begin to have trouble finding the numbers once they have been called or may not be able to follow through with covering the number once called. Fine Motor Skills. Fine motor skills must be used to manipulate the cards whether slide cards or traditional cards and chips are being used. They may repeatedly knock all their chips from their card or be unable to slide the covers into place. Social Appropriateness. The persons ability to interact appropriately in a social setting is also assessed. ------------------------------------------- When using bingo as an assessment tool, one session will tell you a lot about the person. However, observing several games over a course of time is best. If you are a professional in one of the senior settings, learn to assess your clients using bingo. If you are a family member who is noticing some changes in your loved one, get them involved in games such as these. Not only will they help with socialization and entertainment but they may also help you to understand different aspects of your loved one's functional level. There are many websites where you can create your own bingo cards. Just search "free bingo cards" or go to either of these sites http://www.print-bingo.com or http://www.dltk-cards.com There are senior centers throughout Jacksonville which offer full activities calendars including bingo. For a listing of the City of Jacksonville Community Senior Centers go to http://www.coj.net/Departments/Recreation+and+Community+Services/Adult+Services/Community+and+Senior+Centers/default.htm If you have any comments or questions regarding this article or a suggestion for an upcoming article please contact me at jerrylynndaniels@yahoo.com. Continue reading on Examiner.com: Bingo is not just a game - Jacksonville elder care | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/elder-care-in-jacksonville/geriatric-recreational-programming-bingo-not-just-a-game#ixzz1DQWfAjX9
  9. REFLECTING RESIDENTS' SPIRITUAL NEEDS IN CARE PLANS --- By Sue Schoenbeck, R.N., Michael Rock, Jill Cullen, Carol Gabor Authors: Sue Schoenbeck, R.N., is director of resident care; Michael Rock is administrator and chief executive officer; Jill Cullen is plan of care coordinator; and Carol Gabor is a social worker at Ingleside Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Mount Horeb, Wis. --- Far less is known about the human spirit than is known about the body and the mind. But issues of the spirit are important when caring for the elderly in long term care environments, as well as preparing residents, families, and staff for the death of a resident. Therefore, it is judicious for the caregiving team to gather information about spiritual as well as physiological, mental, and psychosocial needs. Ingleside Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Mount Horeb, Wis., has created a spiritual assessment tool congruent with the minimum data set (MDS 2.0) to help determine each resident's spiritual needs, which then can be addressed in the care plan. to create your Spiritual Care Assessment... Ingleside's spiritual care program is rooted in a theory of logotherapy developed by Viktor Frankl, a Viennese psychiatrist who survived several World War II concentration camps. He proposed that people can find meaning in life events, including suffering, and can transcend what fate bestows. Frankl believed that people search for meaning in life up to and often through the death event. Asking questions pertinent to spiritual needs makes residents feel welcome to share their spiritual side. How a person chooses to live life is reflective of the spirit that lies within. By using an assessment tool to gather data, caregivers can build a care plan upon the experiences the resident values most and wishes to retain. The Assessment Tool The first part of Ingleside's spiritual care assessment tool (see box below) gleans information from the resident pertaining to concepts of a god or deity, religious practices, and helping others. Questions include: Do you usually attend church, temple, or synagogue? Do you find strength in your religious faith? Have you participated in or would you be interested in a Bible study group? Do you enjoy helping others? In what ways have you helped others? Ingleside Spiritual Assessment Part I: Activities Name: _______________ Medical Record # ____________ Date___________ Concept of God Is religion or a god important to you? Is prayer helpful? Does a god play a role in your life? Customary Routine: Involvement Pattern Do you find strength in your religious faith? Do you usually attend church, temple, synagogue, etc.? Are there any religious practices that are important to you? Religious Practices Has being sick made any difference in your religious practices or prayer? What religious books or songs are helpful to you? Have you participated in/would you be interested in a bible study group? Helping Others Do you enjoy helping others? In what ways have you helped others? Recommendations for care plan: __________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Assessor's Name _____________________ Title _______________ Source: Ingleside Inc. Part II of the spiritual assessment tool (see box below) engages the resident in conversation about sources of help and strength, relation between spiritual self and health, and impending death. Questions in this section include: What are your personal goals? Do you want to participate in or assist with religious services at the facility? Are there roles you had in your life before that now are closed off to you? What has given your life meaning in the past? What gives your life meaning now? Ingleside Spiritual Assessment Part II: Social Services Name ______________ Medical Record # ________ Date _______ Sources Of Hope And Strength Who is the most important person to you?______________________ Are there roles you had in your life before that are now closed off to you? If so, how do you feel about this? What has given your life meaning? What gives your life meaning now? In what ways do others help you? What helps you most when you feel afraid or need special help? What is your source of strength or hope? Goals What are your personal goals? Do you want to participate in and/or assist with religious services at Ingleside? Relation Between Spiritual And Health What do you think is going to happen to you? Has being sick made any difference in your feelings or beliefs about God or religion? Is there anything particularly frightening or meaningful to you now? Impending Death Do you want a bedside service? __ No __ Yes Clergy: Your own? ______ Parish _______ Phone _______ Other? _______ Parish _______ Phone_______ Do you want it in your room or chapel? _______________ Do you wish to be present or would you prefer it be held without your presence? Are there any special words, prayers, songs, or thoughts you would like expressed at the service? Recommendations for care plan: ___________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Assessor's Name _____________________ Title _______________ Source: Ingleside Inc. Once the caregiver has completed the resident interview, information from the spiritual assessment tool is incorporated into the individual's care plan. For example, when a resident reports prayer as a daily part of his or her past life, staff can include "provide private times for prayer" in the care plan. A resident with Alzheimer's disease for whom evening prayer had been a ritual can be guided by staff each evening in this routine. Staff can assist family members to record familiar prayers for playing to their loved ones. Furthermore, resident prayer and hymn requests can be incorporated into a weekly nondenominational service. If the assessment shows the resident is experiencing spiritual distress, care plan approaches may include pastoral counseling, psychotherapy intervention, and medication regimen evaluation. But caregivers should not assume that residents' feelings will remain static. Entering a nursing facility does not mean a person stops growing and changing. Residents often reevaluate and change what they value. Therefore, spiritual needs must be regularly monitored and changes to the care plan made accordingly to guide staff in providing the support the resident needs. Bedside Closure Service It is understandable that residents and families have heightened spiritual needs as death approaches. But facility management should remember that staff, too, will have intensified needs because of their close interactions with residents. Therefore, Ingleside holds a bedside closure service to comfort those left behind. Part II of the assessment tool provides information about whether or not a resident and family want a service and what they would like incorporated into the service. The service is designed not only to honor the resident in the manner requested, but to give staff the opportunity to say good-bye and to share with family, friends, and the departed some of the good times experienced together. For example, at an Ingleside bedside closure service for a man who communicated only by repeating two syllables, certified nurse assistants (CNAs) told family members how they had learned what the resident wanted by his intonation of the two syllables. Another CNA thanked the family for the opportunity to care for a man who had taught her she wanted to make a career of helping people with speech impairments. A housekeeper commented he would miss joking around and seeing the resident's broad smile. Ingleside staff has assembled a bedside closure service guide that includes some of the songs and prayers most frequently requested by the facility's population. This guide is printed in large type for ease in reading. A staff-written prayer book is given to each new resident and staff member to help people find words with which to pray together. Program Benefits In 1995, Ingleside conducted an exploratory descriptive study of the value of its spiritual care program for residents, families, and staff. Results indicated that the program led to increased knowledge of and response to residents' spiritual needs. Impending deaths were more openly discussed, leading staff to communicate with residents about their last wishes. The quality of life near death was enhanced as individual wishes were honored. Families also benefited. Positive written responses have been received from the families of residents for whom a bedside closure service was held. A daughter wrote on behalf of her family, "We felt the service for Mother was helpful and thoughtful. We felt she was liked and respected although we know she was a trying woman." Giving spiritual care offers staff the opportunity to get to know the spiritual side of the residents and, with residents and families, explore the meaning of life.
  10. It's Time for Laughter

    By: Anita Galli

    Laughter is the best medicine certainly describes this delightful new book.
    There are short stories and funny anecdotes that will be great for ice-breakers, newsletters, posters, greeting cards, and lots of games.

     Begin an afternoon activity using “How to Tell You’re Getting Old…” or “Do You Remember….” All through the book are “Ever Wonder Why” phrases like Ever Wonder Why: A wise man and a wise guy are opposites?”   Your residents need to laugh and enjoy life and you can help accomplish that with the great new book.

    35 pages

    $9.95

  11. Favorite Hymns & Gospel Songs
    By: Helen Ingalls
    Contains the words only in large print of 68 favorite hymns, Christmas carols, and patriotic songs. These songs will be familiar to residents of any faith.
    72 pages

    $9.50

  12. The Professional Activity Manager and Consultant
    Anne D’Antonio-Nocera, Nancy DeBolt, and Nadine Touhey, Editors

    • Trade Paper, Reproducible Forms, 452 pages
    • Published by Idyll Arbor
    • Publication date: 1996
    • ISBN: 9781882883240

    This is the reference book that every manager or consultant needs to have! Whether you are a recreational therapist, activity professional, occupational therapist, or other type of therapist, this book provides you with hands-on instruction to excel at your job as a manager or consultant.

    The forty-two chapters are divided into ten sections:

    • Introduction to Management and Consulting
    • Competency and Ethical Issues
    • Regulatory Issues
    • The Facility
    • Staffing
    • Adult Learning
    • Evaluation
    • Overview of Consulting
    • Consulting Techniques
    • Managing a Consulting Business

    The book contains many ready-made forms, checklists for quality assurance, and other easy-to-read quick reference sections to help you locate the information you need quickly.

    $45.00

  13. Ohio is the Midwest’s eastern gateway, a vast land originally controlled by the Iroquois Indians. An important rail link, Ohio is bordered by the Allegheny Mountains to the east and the farmlands of the Great Plains to the west. A century ago, Ohio’s most famous residents, Orville and Wilber Wright, were two bicycle mechanics who ended up leaving their mark in aviation. Their shop in Dayton is now preserved by the National Park Service. In another nod to the history of flight, the United States Air Force Museum is just outside of the city.

      In Columbus, the state’s capital, artisans display their works at a summer arts and crafts fair while the farmer’s market in Worthington is full of produce from the area’s rich farmland. In Dresden… the world’s largest basket, which is coincidentally near the Longaberger Basket Company, a remarkable success story. Their handmade baskets are sold directly to the consumer. They’re not available in stores. The factory is an incredible 20 acres in size, with more than 6000 artisans working under one roof; a fine example that “made in America” can compete on the world market. Painted barns are another facet of life in rural Ohio. Although advertising on them went out of style in the late 60s, there is still plenty of paint being applied. Scott Hagan, a local barn artist, stays busy painting everything from the state’s logo to old-fashioned quilt patterns on the sides of the old barns.

        Another Ohio artist, Chris Helm, is one of the world’s foremost fly tying experts. He creates flies that are almost too good to fish with. One of his creations takes more than five hours to complete and sells for more than one hundred dollars. In the rolling hills of central Ohio…the largest population of Amish people in the world. From farming to fine woodworking, they’re a rich part of the regional culture. Originally catering to the Amish population, Lehmans is a remarkable store. From butter churns to oil lamps, all of their products are modern day descendants of the original items that anyone could have purchased around the turn of the century. Football is huge in Ohio. In Canton, the Professional Football Hall of Fame is a monument and a museum, a facility with an inspired collection of memorabilia charting the growth of the game over the years and enshrining its greatest players. In Ada, the Wilson Sporting Goods Company has manufactured a variety of balls for different sports over the years, but their leather footballs are what they are best known for. The All American Soapbox Derby is headquartered in Akron. The annual finals race draws thousands of competitors from across the country, kids of all ages who come to compete in an American tradition. Their museum has a collection of winner’s cars going back to the beginning of the races in the 30s. Up north on the shore of Lake Erie, Cedar Point, one of the largest amusement parks in the world with a number of record setting roller coasters.

    $24.95

  14. This is a Songbook Only

    In this songbook you will get the lyrics for each to use in your sing along.

    Songs included in this book are: 

    1 Let It Snow  
    2 Santa Claus is Comin' To Town  
    3 Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas  
    4 Deck the Halls  
    5 We Wish You a Merry Christmas  
    6 Jingle Bells  
    7 O Christmas Tree  
    8 Here Comes Santa Claus  
    9 Rudolph the Red Nose Reindeer  
    10 Jolly Old Saint Nicholas  
    11 O Come All Ye Faithful  
    12 It Came Upon a Midnight Clear  
    13 Angels We Have Heard on High  
    14 Away in a Manger  
    15 Hark the Herald Angels Sing  
    16 The First Noel  
    17 We Three Kings  
    18 While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks  
    19 Good King Wenceslas  
    20 O Little Town of Bethlehem  
    21 Once in Royal David's City  
    22 God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen  
    23 The Huron Carol  
    24 Joy to the World  
    25 Silent Night

    $6.99

  15. Golden Oldies
    1 In the Good Old Summertime  
    2 For Me and My Gal  
    3 Pack Up Your Troubles  
    4 Let Me Call You Sweetheart  
    5 It's a Long Way to Tipperary  
    6 When Irish Eyes Are Smiling  
    7 Lili Marlene   
    8 Smiles  
    9 School Days   
    10 My Blue Heaven  
    11 Margie  
    12 In a Shanty in Old Shanty Town  
    13 When the Red Red Robin  
    14 Five Foot Two  
    15 Darktown Strutter's Ball  
    16 Beautiful Brown Eyes  
    17 You Are My Sunshine  
    18 Bye Bye Blackbird  
    19 Let the Rest of the World Go By  
    20 When You Wore a Tulip  
    21 Shine on Harvest Moon  
    22 Home on the Range  
    23 Red Wing   
    24 Till We Meet Again

    $21.00

  16. Songs from Around the World  takes the audience on a musical journey through well known songs from eleven countries including Canada, the United States and Australia. Waltzing Matilda, That’s Amore',This Land is Your Land, Jamaica Farewell, Blue Hawaii, The Happy Wanderer, Sentimental Journey- 18 songs and 55 minutes of music and memories from around the world. Slides from each country are edited right into the “live” performance!

    Your Residents and Clients will enjoy watching this DVD over and over, the music and images from other counties reminding them of ancestral homes, long ago travels and their favorite far away places! On-screen lyrics make joining in fun and easy!

    • CD-Rom Songbook Included

    Songs from Around the World Song List
    1. Far Away Places
    2. This Land is Your Land
    3. Down Mexico Way
    4. Jamaica Farewell
    5. English Country Garden
    6. Irish Lullaby
    7. Banks of Loch Lomand
    8. La Vie En Rose
    9. Besame Mucho
    10. Happy Wanderer
    11. That's Amore!
    12. Never On Sunday
    13. You Belong To Me
    14. A Slow Boat To China
    15. Sukiyaki
    16. Waltzing Matilda
    17. Blue Hawaii
    18. Sentimental Journey

    $26.95

  17. This is a nostalgic book that contains fill in the blank ONE word answers that bring you back to your childhood. One word leads you to a myriad of feelings and sensations and conversation.

    Mothballs In My Attic is a resource tool used by activity planners in the medical field as well as caregivers for dementia patients. The book can be used for both individual or group sessions and is a wonderful memory jogger. There are 12 chapters and over 220 fill in the blank with ONE word questions that stimulate conversation and reminiscing.

    Mothballs in My Attic (MIMA- 'my-mah’) uses one word from your past to trigger a familiar thought, smell, or visual sensation that brings in a flood of surrounding memories. . . suddenly, you are having a MIMA moment!

     

    The sisters, Cindy and Barbara, invite you to journey with them to the past without losing precious moments in the present. They have a passion to help you remember the pleasant things as well as major turning points that we have all experienced growing up. They will prompt you to journey back to the mothballs in your attic!
     
    How it Works:
    Simple questions are answered by you about your childhood or growing up times. You answer with one word to complete the sentence, and then it happens: the MIMA Moment!
     
    Example:
    My childhood kitchen table
    shape was________________.

     


    When you answer the question with one word, your mind then goes back to your childhood home and fills in the rest of the story: where you sat at the table, what time you ate dinner every night, what placemats, plates, drinking glasses were used, and so on. The process of a one-word answer brings the experience of the entire scenario. Suddenly, you are transformed to that time, and instantly, you have experienced a MIMA Moment. The inevitable smile is unavoidable. 
     
    Take your time; it's a memory extravaganza. It's not to be rushed but rather enjoyed. Take the trip; it only costs a thought to purchase a MIMA moment. It's worth the investment!

    MIMA_example.gif

    $14.95

  18. Volume II - Recreational Activities for more Successful Programing
    By: Jacquelyn Vaughan-Williams, Ph.D., TRS/TXC, CTRS, CLP and Pam Sander, TRS/TSC
    Well-known authors and activity professionals, Pam Sander and Jackie Vaughan have combined their talents and experience to put together two volumes of wonderful activities for working with all ages but especially the elderly in long-term care. Like Volume I, Volume II is categorized according to MDS v2.0
    Featured Activities include: games, crafts, cards, arts, talking/conversing, gardening, exercise, sports.. and many more.
    Each Activity is Detailed by:
    • equipment
    • number of participants
    • directions
    • leadership hints
      Plus all the extra added bits of information necessary for success.
      201 pages

    $39.50

  19. Vol. I - Recreational Activities for More Successful Programing
    By: Jacquelyn Vaughan-Williams, Ph.D.,TRS/TXC, CTRS, CLP and Pam Sander, TRS/TSC
    This book is designed for activity directors and recreation program leaders working with any population, in any setting.
    Every activity is tried and true and has been organized to correlate with MDS v2.0.
    The term user friendly is very apropo as each activity details the equipment required, environment, and number of participants.
    There are objectives and values listed, leadership hints, safety concerns, and most importantly, detailed game directions and procedures.
    Activity categories include Creative, Mental, Social, Physical, and Emotional.
    The authors’ desire is to help the activity director to enhance the existing programs by using new and different ideas while building on proven old ones.
    201 pages
    Also see 2105PP - Volume II

    $39.50

  20. History At A Glance
    By: Jim Brennan
    This book covers the period from 1829 to 1990--more than 160 years.
    Many older residents still recall hearing stories from their parents and grandparents about experiences and life in the 1800's and 1900's. Such historical events are very much a part of their early memories. The material was designed to serve as a memory stimulator to help keep the mind alert by recalling past events and experiences.
    153 pages.

    $20.00

  21. Activity Care Plans For Long Term Care Facilities
    By: Pamela Sander, T.R.S.
    This handbook is especially developed to assist activity directors write care plans for the most common conditions.
    Included::
    • Long-term goals and approaches specific to Alzheimer's
    • Arthritis
    • Bedfast Residents
    • Stroke
    • Diabetes
    • Multiple Sclerosis
    • Parkinson's
      ...and many more.
      There is also a new chapter on closed-head injuries and a cross index and glossary are included for quick and easy reference.
      212 pages.

    $28.50

  22. An Insider's Guide to Effective Staff Motivation Programs

    Great ideas to motivate and energize your staff. Does your staff need an attitude adjustment? Your facility should be a thriving enjoyable workplace but that does not happen by chance. Implementing these motivating activities, contests, parties/events, programs, and holiday-themed activities will brighten the daily work schedule of all employees in all departments. Some events can be shared with the residents for better morale throughout the facility.

    Scavenger hunts, paycheck thank you’s, and “The Grand Scrapbook” are just a few of the motivating activities to get you started. There are 18 suggestions for special events and parties. Sixteen different contests and 26 programs will give you lots of ideas for fun throughout the year. And there are great holiday ideas for every month of the year.

    Don’t let the activity department have all of the fun! Join in and show how much you appreciate and respect the job your staff is doing.

    $15.50

  23. An Insider's Guide to Effective Staff Motivation Programs

    Great ideas to motivate and energize your staff. Does your staff need an attitude adjustment? Your facility should be a thriving enjoyable workplace but that does not happen by chance. Implementing these motivating activities, contests, parties/events, programs, and holiday-themed activities will brighten the daily work schedule of all employees in all departments. Some events can be shared with the residents for better morale throughout the facility.

    Scavenger hunts, paycheck thank you’s, and “The Grand Scrapbook” are just a few of the motivating activities to get you started. There are 18 suggestions for special events and parties. Sixteen different contests and 26 programs will give you lots of ideas for fun throughout the year. And there are great holiday ideas for every month of the year.

    Don’t let the activity department have all of the fun! Join in and show how much you appreciate and respect the job your staff is doing.

    $15.50

  24. A cozy, stimulating therapeutic hand product. Contains squeezable ball in center, satin pocket, button patch, and three twiddle gadget attachments.

    Twiddle™Muff, Twiddle™Sport, & Twiddle™Cat are therapeutic products providing
    comfort, warmth and movement to support increased flexibility and brain stimulation for daily
    living activities. (Patent Pending)

    Each Twiddle® is made from a cozy fabric and comes with stimulating hand activities:

    • Tethered within the center of the muff, a very soft squeezable ball.
    • Three exchangeable ‘twiddle’ gadgets:
      • a sealed satin bag containing movable marbles.
      • a strand of textured ribbons
      • a loop of colorful wooden beads
    • Soft, smooth pocket for personal essentials
    • Velcro tab patch providing stimulating noise & movement


    All Twiddle™ gadgets are detachable to enable customization and easy machine washing and drying of the muff.

    TwiddleMuff_gadgets.gif

    **TwiddleMuffs were featured in Nursing Homes and LTC Magazine in March 2007 in their 'Product Spotlight' section**

    $44.95

  25. A cozy, therapeutic hand product. Contains squeezable ball in center, satin pocket, and three twiddle gadget attachments. Available in Cream or Chocolate Brown.

    Twiddle™Muff, Twiddle™Sport, & Twiddle™Cat are therapeutic products providing
    comfort, warmth and movement to support increased flexibility and brain stimulation for daily
    living activities. (Patent Pending)

    Each Twiddle® is made from a cozy fabric and comes with stimulating hand activities:

    • Tethered within the center of the muff, a very soft squeezable ball.
    • Three exchangeable ‘twiddle’ gadgets:
      • a sealed satin bag containing movable marbles.
      • a strand of textured ribbons
      • a loop of colorful wooden beads
    • Soft, smooth pocket for personal essentials
    • Velcro tab patch providing stimulating noise & movement


    All Twiddle™ gadgets are detachable to enable customization and easy machine washing and drying of the muff.

    TwiddleMuff_gadgets.gif

    **TwiddleMuffs were featured in Nursing Homes and LTC Magazine in March 2007 in their 'Product Spotlight' section**

    TwiddleCat_largebrown.gifTwiddleCat_large.gif

    twiddleCat_lady.jpg

    $39.95

  26. A streamlined cozy therapeutic hand product. Contains squeezable ball in center, satin pocket, velcro twiddle patch, and three twiddle gadget attachments.

    Twiddle™Muff, Twiddle™Sport, & Twiddle™Cat are therapeutic products providing
    comfort, warmth and movement to support increased flexibility and brain stimulation for daily
    living activities. (Patent Pending)

    Each Twiddle® is made from a cozy fabric and comes with stimulating hand activities:

    • Tethered within the center of the muff, a very soft squeezable ball.
    • Three exchangeable ‘twiddle’ gadgets:
      • a sealed satin bag containing movable marbles.
      • a strand of textured ribbons
      • a loop of colorful wooden beads
    • Soft, smooth pocket for personal essentials
    • Velcro tab patch providing stimulating noise & movement


    All Twiddle™ gadgets (shown below) are detachable to enable customization and easy machine washing and drying of the muff.

    TwiddleMuff_gadgets.gif

    **TwiddleMuffs were featured in Nursing Homes and LTC Magazine in March 2007 in their 'Product Spotlight' section**

     

    TwiddleSport_2nrow.gif

    twiddleSport_guy.jpg

    $39.95

  27. Best Laid Plans by M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP A best-laid plan refers to when things gone awry or simply stated, something that has not turned out as well as one initially had hoped for. The expression the best-laid plan carries the implication that one should not expect everything to always turn out as planned. Easier said than done… right? The idea that no matter how much thought or pre-planning gets devoted towards a certain task or endeavor and it may still turn out unsuccessful is disheartening to say the least. That said, when things do not go as expected, it is completely normal to feel as though someone has just taken a bit of a bite out of your self-confidence. Such is the scenario when the appropriate time has been dedicated to review resident assessments, history, clinical status and pursuits of interest to develop the perfect mix of calendar events for your resident. Surprisingly and low and behold – your resident does not want to participate in the event. In fact, your resident very unapologetically lets you know that your event was a total flop. Adding salt to the wound, that is the same resident initially expressed an interest and requested the event to begin with! Yikes yet again! It Happens Without a doubt, many of us if not all of us in this field have been there. Sincerely and earnestly planning what we believe to be on target “person centered” pursuits of interest. Only to have the very same residents who had asked for the program to flat out reject it. So what happens when those “best laid plans” go off the rails and turn out all wrong! When your plans hit the fan, you can either fuss about it and go negative or choose to take the opportunity to cultivate an optimistic viewpoint. How it that done anyways? It’s a question of rolling with the punches – and acquiring the ability to remain flexible – not take the rejection personally – and lastly, learning from the experience. “Adversity can - make you stronger!” Why? Humans have the capacity and the determination to avoid the same outcome previously experienced. Resiliency is a gift and one that we all posses - it’s time to pull up those boot straps ladies and gents and look at the process to find out why that well planned event was not well received by your resident. Resident Planning Committee Make it your mission to involve the residents in planning the calendar every time a new one needs to be created. The consistent and routine resident participation in planning events will lead to a number of great benefits for both you the professional and the residents you serve. Start the process by searching for two residents that seem excited about contributing ideas for calendar events. These two residents will become your “volunteer ambassadors”. These “ambassadors” should be good communicators, warm and friendly residents willing to personally visit fellow residents to talk about all the ways he/she can contribute to facility programming and thereby adding their valued ideas. This “buddy resident” system is a successful approach for both new and existing residents. New Residents Consider that newbie residents may be shy and undecided about starting interactions with the large existing (perhaps scary) group of residents. When the new resident is approached by two friendly, outgoing and happy residents; he/she may find it less intimidating and more likely open to be part of the Resident Planning Committee. Existing Residents “Buddy resident” system makes for great ambassadors to help current residents as well. The pair can help to revitalize interest and help fellow residents to feel valued once again. It just takes a couple of energetic residents to give a gentle nudge now and then. Committee Structure and Process If you have more than one resident interested in chairing the committee, ask residents to assume the resident chair position on a rotation bases. This gives everyone that desires to do so a turn and gives a well deserved break to those that have previously served as chair. Write the resident ideas for events on a white board – keep them up on the white board till the next meeting. Why? 1) This allows you to erase events after they have been put on the calendar. Thus, you can keep adding and erasing as you are able to schedule them in any given month. Additionally, this is a great visual for the resident to see his/her ideas actively go from the white board to the calendar and gives the resident a sense of achievement. 2) Visually displays what the Resident Planning Committee has created for all to see. This is particularly useful for memory impaired residents as they can become agitated or upset when they do not like or recognize a program idea even though they initially suggested it. NOTE: Memory issues are the commonly seen contributor relating to event rejection and refusal because the resident does not recognize what they asked for in the previous moments. 3) Residents can be fearful that their ideas may not be well liked by others. Create an “anonymous “idea box” to keep the identities of those that would not otherwise give up what they secretly want you to add to facility programming. Memory impaired residents may perhaps make up the majority of the group you serve. When a program event is rejected by this group, whether it was initially the residents’ idea or not, do not take it personally. Remind yourself that his/her behavior is a product of related memory issues. The most effective response for you as a professional is to quickly “redirect” your resident to something else to prevent further emotional or behavioral escalation. Know Your Audience Knowing who your audience means that you can adapt the content of your presentation to address the main concerns of your audience. Professionals leading a group of seniors regardless of the group size must know and understand why the group wants to be present, what motivates the group, and whether you are matching your information to their level of understanding and interests. It’s an ongoing day to day learning experience for the Activity Professional and we all know that you have the knowledge and the skills – Remember that you got this! The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry. No matter how carefully a project is planned, something may still go wrong with it. The saying is adapted from a line in “To a Mouse,” by Robert Burns: “The best laid schemes o' mice an' men / Gang aft a-gley.” Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org BUY Now Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
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