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  2. Activities, Life Enrichment directors: I am the composer and producer of a unique never-released 45 minute 1938 silent sci-fi film, "As the Earth Turns." The film has a a great story, fun for all ages movie with effects like "Flash Gordon" and "Things to Come". The film is in distribution (I own it, along with the filmmakers film-estate), and I am offering virtual (Zoom) or in-person screenings for retirement homes and communities along with never-before-seen bonus features and live Q&A. I also have an award-winning 14 minute mini-documentary about the filmmaker, Richard Lyford, who made this film in Seattle when he was 20 years old! The backstory on him, the film, and how I got involved is amazing! This is a limited opportunity, and perfect for the season. Screenings are available throughout the day and early evening (I am PST). I have posters and PR you can print to promote your event. If you are interested in getting more information about this presentation, please contact me. Thanks, and I hope to hear from you, Ed Hartman https://www.astheearthturns.com/ https://edhartmanmusic.com/as-the-earth-turns-live-online-presentation
  3. Last week
  4. View this email in your browser Entertaining Residents on the Weekend Take a quick tour through the Activity Directors Network Facebook feed and you will find the common topic of entertaining bored residents over the weekend. Peppered into some of the suggestions, hints of frustration poke though about the idea that Activity Directors are somehow expected to entertain the residents 24/7. Of course, this is not possible, but it does suggest an insatiable entertainment need for some of our more active residents. Let’s look at some of the fantastic suggestions made by some of our fellow Activity Directors: Open Closet Create an accessible closet stocked with items for entertainment and add or rotate new items in. Items to include: Boardgames Video Game Player and Games Packs of Playing Cards Word Games Magazines Books Blank Greeting Cards Art Supplies (for painting, drawing, collage work, coloring, crafting) Paint by Number Movies Radio Boredom Packets A couple of the comments mentioned creating packets that the residents could grab and work on whenever they choose. You could make it a contest or have them turn them in for a treat or prize on Mondays as incentive, but if you can make them interesting enough with some sort of hook you may not need to. Items to include in your packet: Interesting Articles Funny Stories Riddles Journal Page Coloring Pages Trivia Look and Find Crossword Word Search Weekly Newsletter Health Brochures Scavenger Hunt Set a scavenger hunt for the residents to do over the weekend. One AD mentioned she hid pictures all over the facility and the residents had to find each one of them. Those that found all of them, received a prize on Monday. We made a FREE Halloween Scavenger Hunt for you to use with your residents this weekend! Click below for a printout of the pictures for hiding and the form to hand out to interested residents. FREE Activity Worksheets Movies Everybody loves a movie, especially on the weekend. This one is always a biggie and with the right movie selection it can be a serious weekend event. Keep your movies fresh and circulate new options constantly. Surprise your residents often by adding to your classic movie selection. This is an easy event to get help pulling off. You only need one volunteer to pop some popcorn and get the movie going. Where to Watch Classic Movies Online: The 7 Best Sites and Services Source: WhatNerd.Com 1. Criterion Channel As the name suggests, the Criterion Channel is a digital streaming version of the Criterion Collection of films. You won’t find every single film in the collection here, but new movies do rotate in and out each month. The selection is large however and doesn’t just include the films themselves but features around various movies and film in general. At $10.99/month or $99/year, this is a major value for film buffs. 2. Watch TCM No, I’m not just suggesting that you watch the Turner Classic Movies channel on your TV provider of choice. Watch TCM is a TV Everywhere app that lets you sign in with your TV provider and then watch movies on demand at no extra cost. The only downside of this service is that modern streaming cable replacements like Sling TV don’t seem to be supported, so this is only for those with cable or satellite TV. 3. Fandor Self-described as a service for movie lovers, the main emphasis of Fandor is on independent and foreign movies. This includes several classic films as well, which make up a sizable portion of the more than 4,000 movies offered via the service. This is one of the more affordable services on this list too, costing just $5.99/month or $49/year. 4. Kanopy If you have a library card, you need to be using Kanopy. This service works with libraries and universities throughout the US to provide streaming movies for members. This includes a wide range of various films, but it includes a large library of classics. 5. Archive.org You may know Archive.org at the home of the Wayback Machine, but as the name says, it’s an archive of various sorts of digital media. This includes a vast selection of public domain films. If you’re a fan of shorts from this time period, the Prelinger Archives are hosted here as well, with various educational and promotional short films to keep you busy for hours on end. 6. Netflix Classics While the selection isn’t what it used to be, you can still find some classic movies on Netflix. Depending on how you access the service, they can be difficult to find. One of the easiest ways is to hop on to your computer and point your browser to the website, then select Classics from the genre selector. Some of the movies you’ll find are newer than what I think of when I think of classics, but you may view this as a plus. 7. Hulu Classics There was a time when Hulu was one of the best streaming services for classic movies, as it hosted much of the Criterion Collection. Now that that’s a separate service, you won’t find many of them on Hulu any longer. That said, there are still a fair number of classic films available on the service. If you subscribe to Starz, either as an add-on or as part of Hulu with Live TV, the number of classics available grows considerably. Don’t Forget About Discs If you’ve got DVD copies of older films, don’t just assume that a streaming version will look better. In some cases, the streaming version won’t look any better than your DVD copy, and it could even look worse. If you have a Blu-ray, it will almost certainly look better than streaming. Hire Entertainers If you are able to hire entertainers or book special volunteers at least one weekend a month your residents will be thrilled! The question is where to find these entertainers. Some are fairly easy to find through forums, Facebook, internet searches, or word of mouth. Other’s however may not present as Entertainers but are. See examples to catch my drift: Book Club- Read a book written by a local author and invite the author in for a reading and book signing. Cake Decorating- Invite a local baker to come in and do a cupcake decorating demonstration. Adaptive Fitness- Ask a local trainer from a gym to come in and show the residents some low impact moves they can do to stay more active. Church Choir- Live music is loved by most. Invite a local singing group or choir to come and put on a performance for your residents. Computer Class- Invite someone from a local technology store or computer repair shop to come in a give a lesson on how to use the computer for a specific purpose (ie edit photos, search The Met’s database for art, find good book suggestions on Goodreads.com, etc.) Oktoberfest- Invite someone from a local brewery to have a tasting and discuss the process for making beer. We just added a new section to the Forum for Facility Entertainers. Add any you have used or have heard of to help each other out. The list will grow from here! Facility Entertainers Forum Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351
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  6. Title"Bonnie Barchicchats Senior Comedy Afternoons Bonnie Barchichats Senior Comedy Afternoons View full entertainer
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  8. Hello! I am Mike Smolka. I am the Owner of Photo Finish Racing, the board game... The BIIIG board game! I make contact with you on the referral from Rhonda Cap, the Activities Director at Leisure World AZ, here in Mesa. We have arranged to schedule a Kentucky Derby style event here and Photo Finish Racing will be the center piece of this activity. Quite by happenstance, I was able to introduce the game in person to Rhonda and her assistant, Jamie, and they agreed that this game would be a terrific fit among other community activities they offer. They suggested I reach out to a larger audience... and here we are! My father invented the game originally over 70 years ago, but we just recently have finally brought it to market.... VERY FEW people have ever heard of us... until now.... We feature a HUGE playing surface and the simple but effective rules promote ENGAGEMENT among everyone present... Please see (ME! in our short tutorial video) at PhotoFinishRacing.com under the Rules tab. Easy to Learn, Easy to Play, and COMPLETELY ENGAGING THROUGHOUT! What questions might this extended community have for me? Thank you again, Mike "Smoke" Smolka Owner/President Photo Finish Racing... and Proud Sponsor of the PDJF -Permanently Disabled Jockey's Fund
  9. Activity Director Needed - Facility is WhiteOak of Lancaster North Carolina Ask for Brittany...
  10. Hi Nicole I read a lot about this some time back. I am not sure where it stands now. May I suggest you go to our FB page & ask this question lots ppl using it. https://www.facebook.com/groups/117636186862
  11. Has anyone ever been required to obtain a Motion Picture License in order to be allowed to show movies to your residents? I am new to this building and my administrator just gave me a license from the MPLC that gives permission for us to show movies and play music. It is a rather pricey license and one that I am not sure we need. Does anyone else have any thoughts on this? Thanks!
  12. View this email in your browser Wandering Residents In residential aged care facilities there are many factors that may influence residents to wander. These commonly include: Inactivity/boredom – lack of activity may lead the person to wander around looking for something to do. In some instances wandering dissipates loneliness and the behavior in and of itself, is often a substitute for lack of social interaction. In contradiction, wandering surprisingly may also be a response to overstimulation and overwhelming situations. Fear, agitation, and confusion commonly lead to “dementia” wandering outdoors or in public environments. Some emotional cues that can cause wandering include: increased levels of stress or fear. Residents with “dementia” who wander are moving about in ways that may appear aimless but often have purpose. People may wander in response to an unmet basic need like human contact, hunger, or thirst; a noisy or confusing environment; or because they are experiencing some type of distress, like pain or the need to use the toilet. Wandering can be helpful or dangerous, depending on the situation. The Balancing Act It’s a balancing act for sure but it is important to look beyond the words or behaviors to discover the feelings that the resident might earnestly be trying to express. Strong emotions may also be caused by unmet needs. Staff must implement the process of deduction to work out what needs are not being addressed and meet the resident “where they are” when possible. Residents may wander for any number of reasons: Physical needs Psychological and social needs Cognitive needs Non-goal-directed wandering requires a response in a manner that addresses both safety issues and an evaluation to identify root causes to the degree possible. Moving about the facility aimlessly may indicate that the resident is frustrated, anxious, bored, hungry, or depressed. Although people who wander may gain social contact, exercise, and stimulation, the resident may consequently become lost or exhausted. Hence, they may become overwhelmed and over tired, which predictably causes sudden outwardly hasty behaviors such as wandering or higher probability of injuries to self and/or others. Person-Centered Care for Wandering Behavior Simply stated, some basic principles for people with dementia stems from understanding and supporting the residents’ rights. To be sure, the onset of dementia does not preclude inherently due personal rights. Understand that the individual beyond the “dementia” is becoming increasingly hidden rather than lost. This means that he/she is still there, and it’s your mission to reclaim the essence of the individual that once was and bring them out of hiding. Those who were highly sociable and had an active lifestyle prior to having mental decline are most likely to wander. The use of certain antipsychotic medications can cause side effects that increase the desire to wander and be in perpetual motion. Sedating medications can also increase the risk for wandering due to confusion. Other causes of wandering include the following: Memory deficits Poor vision Disorientation Language deficits Searching for security Searching to fulfill an unmet need such as to relieve hunger, thirst, pain, constipation, and the need to urinate Searching for a loved one Boredom Person centered care plans must consequently demonstrate this principle. Here are some examples of appropriate goals: Personalize the resident’s surroundings. Interpret behavior from the resident’s viewpoint. Acknowledge and validate the resident’s feelings. Involve the resident with dementia in decision-making. Create target goals for the resident to achieve based on resident history and his/her skills that have not yet been lost. Focus on the journey- not the results. Evaluate the Behavior Physical Needs: Does the resident need to use the bathroom? Is the behavior due to medication side affects? Is the resident: Hungry, thirsty, or generally uncomfortable? Searching for a place that is warmer or cooker, darker or lighter? Looking for a place that is more familiar (does the resident have familiar belongings in his/her room)? Responding to physical illness, e.g., dehydration, infection, congestive heart failure, etc.? Psychological and Social Needs: Is the resident: Restless or agitated and trying to relieve anxiety? Bored, lonely, or seeking company? Following a previously familiar imprinted routine: acting out movement to and from the bus stop to pick up the children – going to work? Cognitive Needs: Is the resident: Disoriented or lost? Disoriented due to medication side affects Overstimulated or understimulated? For the resident, wandering may be positive if it fulfills a need for exercise, sensory stimulation, or purposeful behavior. Many nursing homes provide a safe environment on a locked unit for this reason. The negative side of wandering is it may lead to falls, excess fatigue, anxiety, accidental exposure to certain chemicals, altercations with other residents and unintended wandering outdoors where more danger may be waiting to cause harm. Make it your mission to find the balance in the day and life of your resident by looking beyond the words or behaviors to discover the feelings that the resident might earnestly be trying to express. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351
  13. View this email in your browser WHAT IS THE LONG TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM (LTCOP)? The Ombudsman program advocates for resident of nursing homes, board and care, assisted living and other similar adult care facilities. State Ombudsmen and their designated representatives work to resolve problems individual residents may encounter and effect change at the local, state, and national levels with the objective of improving the quality of care for the elderly population. The ombudsman service offers a way for older adults to voice their complaints and have concerns addressed so they can live with dignity and respect. Ombudsman provides information about how to find a facility and what to do to get quality care. They are trained to resolve problems and assist the resident with complaints. However, unless the resident gives the Ombudsman permission to share his/her concerns, these matters are kept confidential. Federal Older Americans Act (OAA) Under the federal Older Americans Act (OAA) every state is required to have an Ombudsman Program that addresses complaints and advocates for improvements in the long term care system. Each state has an Office of the State Long Term Care Ombudsman, headed by a full time State Long Term Care Ombudsman who directs the program statewide. Staff and thousands of volunteers are designated by the State Ombudsmen as representatives to directly serve the individual resident’s needs. What is the role of the ombudsman in a healthcare setting? The healthcare ombudsman is employed by the state department of insurance, and works with consumers to resolve conflicts, determine long-term care needs, and provide guidance in bringing insurance carriers and the people who need them together. A nursing home ombudsman advocates for the residents of long-term care facilities. Nursing home ombudsmen protects vulnerable residents and help defend their most basic rights. They handle complaints related to physical and verbal abuse, neglect, and other forms of improper care. NOTE: A Long-Term Care Ombudsman can address most any issue that arises in a long-term care or assisted living facility. Commonly, Ombudsmen will investigate any violations of residents' rights and dignity, and any physical or mental abuse, whether intentional or not. What Concerns Does an Ombudsman Address? Below are a few of the most commonly sought after complaint resolutions that the Ombudsman may need to address: Slow responses to resident calls Poor facility food quality Staffing issues (mistreatment, shortages, inadequate skills, etc.,) A lack of social opportunities & interactions Disruptions in sleep Violation of residents' rights or dignity Physical, verbal, or mental abuse, deprivation of services necessary to maintain residents' physical and mental health, or unreasonable confinement Poor quality of care, including inadequate personal hygiene and slow response to requests for assistance Improper transfer or discharge of patient Inappropriate use of chemical or physical restraints In addition to identifying, investigating, and resolving complaints, Ombudsman programs responsibilities will include: Educating residents, their family and facility staff about residents’ rights, good care practices, and similar long term services and supports resources; Ensuring residents have regular and timely access to ombudsman services; Providing technical support for the development of resident and family councils; Advocating for changes to improve residents’ quality of life and care; Providing information to the public regarding long term care facilities and services, residents’ rights, and legislative and policy issues; Representing resident interests before governmental agencies; and Seeking legal, administrative and other remedies to protect residents. Ombudsman programs do not: Conduct licensing and regulatory inspections or investigations; Perform Adult Protective Services (APS) investigations; or Provide direct care for residents. Residents’ Rights Ombudsman programs help residents, family members, and others understand residents rights and support residents in exercising their rights guaranteed by law> most nursing homes participate in Medicare and Medicaid, and therefore must meet federal requirements, including facility responsibilities and residents rights. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. How to Become an Activity Director in the US Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351
  14. Home with peace, care taking and feels like native home where they can live with all other people out there like a family. It is specially for only those who came here to live the second part of their life in a senior citizen home.
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  17. Hello everyone. I have Been reading some of yalls comments on Activities during the weekends. So here is my question. Looking for recommendations. I am an activity director and our census usually runs around 50. I have no assistant or no one willing to help out at all when it comes to the activity department. I feel so over whelmed most days. This is due to me having to work the floor as an aide and do my scheduled activities. My question is does anyone else feel like they are finding themselves working in other departments other than your own department? Reason why I am asking this is because they don't want me going in to over time to come up and do activities on weekends, yet its ok to go into over time during week due to working on floor as an aide. So I am wondering does anyone else have this problem and if so what do you schedule for activities for the residents on your calendar with no help or no volunteers?
  18. View this email in your browser Celebrate Grandparent's Day September 12th, 2021 Not everyone has their grandparent as they grow to be an adult. It is a special thing and the day to celebrate it is coming up. Grandparent's Day falls on September 12th this year. Today's activities are geared towards the resident's grandchildren, but don't necessarily involve direct contact in case that is prohibitive due to COVID or distance. These canvas transfers work best with printed or photocopied pictures, making acquiring them a bit easier and cheaper. Ask residents families to email some of their favorite pics of the resident's grandchildren and get them printed out before the activity. Once completed, encourage residents to display their pictures for Grandparent's Day. Activity Spin-Off Invite staff to bring in pictures of their grandparents and display them on a designated bulletin board. Your residents will love getting to know more about the staff and their families. Full Tutorial The following is a list of 28 questions for your residents regarding their past. Buy inexpensive composition books for participating residents and have them answer one question per day in their books. Encourage them to elaborate on each answer and fill as many or as little pages as they wish. Upon completion of the 28 day prompts, your residents will have a very special book they can send to their grandchildren to treasure. Use the list below as your list or as a jump off point for inspiration for a list of your own making. FREE Printable 23 Things You Loved About Your Grandparent’s Kitchen By: Tiana Rogers Source: SoYummy.com Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351
  19. We were constantly trying to think of prizes that the people would like, then we started "Bring a Prize to Win a Prize". That way, people can donate thier gently used items and tinkets and play for things they all like. If someone doesn't bring a prize, they can still play. I remind the group that the prizes are as awesome and as plentiful as they decide. Works great!
  20. Hi Tracy.. how do we get in touch with you and your program .. timing is great!
  21. View this email in your browser Resident Rummaging, Hoarding, Hiding It is not unusual to step into a secured Alzheimer’s’ unit where you observe someone actively rummaging or searching through cabinets, drawers, and any number and any manner of subjectively intriguing storage areas, even closets and the refrigerators. It is also a common practice for residents to hide coveted items in the most peculiar places that they will likely be unable to remember later. Although the behavior can be concerning and disruptive, it provides engagement at best but can easily turn into a safety risk. Proactive measures must be implemented to ensure safety that provisions concerning this behavior prevents potential hard to self or others. It is not recommended that you eradicate opportunities for this behavior as it often helps the resident to dissipate anxiety, offers engagement and in fact often helps your resident to feel useful. Note: The behavior might have some level of logic behind the action. Residents often set about this behavior because they are actually looking for something specific, although unable to neither identify nor describe that illusive item. Understanding the Basics According to the Alzheimer's Association, hoarding and hiding behaviors usually begin in the early to middle stages of the disease, and often stem from trying to have some control in their lives. Rummaging, meanwhile, may occur when an individual with Alzheimer’s disease believes something has gone missing. More specifically, the Alzheimer's Association identifies a few possible causes -- psychological, medical and environmental -- for rummaging, hiding, and hoarding, including: Physical changes within the brain leading to confusion, memory loss and impaired judgment The individual senses loss of control The desire for a sense of security or feeling that they may "need" something Seeing and touching things gives them comfort Fear of losing items or being robbed Inability to distinguish between valued and disposable items Boredom, lack of stimulation, and difficulty initiating new activities Reasons for Rummaging Behaviors Boredom: Rummaging behavior may spring from boredom; particularly when opportunities are not abundantly available for engagement. These busy “seekers” are doing just that – keeping busy with something that is found to be self occupying- even when the behavior behind their quest becomes unwanted and has the potential to increase safety risk to self and/or others. Note: In fact, the old adage applies here: “negative attention is better than no attention at all”. Try to quickly understand and recognize what is causing the behavior and measure your response appropriately to prevent that unwanted behavior. Coping Mechanism: Rummaging can be a coping mechanism in response to the disorientation typically caused by dementia. The behavior can occur when the resident is trying to reassure him/herself or self-soothe with familiar items or when they are trying to fill a void or need, like eating when hungry. Loss of Useful Contribution: Consider that what looks like rummaging could also be a way for the resident to feel that they are doing something productive or helps them to feel useful in some way. In the days past, your resident may have fallen into that “problem solver” or “fixer” personality. These characteristics almost are always the reason for “busy seekers” to search for anything that is perceived to be lost items. Triggers: In some cases, the resident with dementia might start rummaging in response to a “triggering” event. The ability to understand the circumstances that “trigger” the unwanted behavior before it occurs puts you way ahead of the game to support a peaceful environment for your resident. Source: https://dailycaring.com/9-ways-to-manage-dementia-rummaging-behavior/ Note: Consider creating a “behavior log” to record the time of day, the surrounding environment, the individuals involved and the type of event to see if there is a repeated situation from which the resident becomes agitated. You will be looking for repeated patterns to determine what circumstances instigate the behavior. “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” Rummaging Freedom [Safe Zone] Treat rummaging as an opportunity for engagement. Include items like clothing, socks, copies of memorable photos, a fake checkbook, reading books, greeting care, or a wallet filled with old receipts, credit card “look alike” and fake money – anything that could spark interest. Hobbies or career related items from the resident history are sure to peak interest. Themed boxes like a sewing or knitting drawer, a sports basket, a costume jewelry box, a tool box, or any music related items, etc. Always show the resident where to find his/her themed box so as not to elevate anxiety levels. Review the following for more ways to create a “safe zone” for resident rummaging: Keep the person with Alzheimer’s from going into unused rooms. This limits his or her rummaging through and hiding things. Do a search to learn where the resident often hides things. Once you find these places, check them often, without the residents’ knowledge. Keep all trash cans securely covered or out of sight. Alzheimer’s residents may not remember the purpose of the container or may rummage through it. Check trash containers before you empty them, in case something of value has been hidden there or thrown away by accident. Note: A resident that often disposes of dentures, hearing aids and/or glasses can make for a very unhappy family member. In addition, loss of such adaptive devices has the potential to further increase resident agitation and increase unwanted behaviors. More ideas to ensure safety and less disruption as follows: Lock up dangerous or toxic products, or place them out of sight and out of reach. Keep backups of frequently lost items to prevent the start of yet another frantic search. Example: Several similar look-a-like handbags stored out of sight will do the trick when the original one becomes lost. You will always be viewed as the hero when you help your resident find that missing handbag. Remove spoiled food from the refrigerator (if accessible) and cabinets. Food gone bad simply becomes a doctor’s visit when consumed due to the resident's lack of judgment and/or sense of taste. Make commonly used items easy to find. The resident behavior may be valid if they are looking for something specific, but can’t find it. This is particularly frustrating when the resident is unable to explain nor describe what they are looking for. Consider putting things in clear containers or specific drawers and label contents. Or keep similar items together, like similar clothing in the same drawer – underwear, tops, bottoms, socks, etc. Failed attempts to stop a resident from hiding, rummaging, hoarding, and or re-organizing things can cause increased agitation and paranoia for the resident that is bound and determined to engage in such behavior. You can mitigate agitation and manage the behavior through creative and inventive ideas that allow the behavior while maintaining a safe and less disruptive environment. In doing so, the resident will regard you as a supportive partner rather than viewing you as someone that is interfering - - and that’s exactly where you want to be. Reference: https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/when-person-alzheimers-rummages-and-hides-things?utm_source=NIA+Main&utm_campaign=8c48100ffd-20190409_rummaging&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ffe42fdac3-8c48100ffd-7499965 Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351
  22. The N.A.P.T. Course is accepted by and prepares each Student for APNCC National Activity Professional Board Certification The APNCC.org AP-BC is the certification recognized under CMS.gov F Tag 680 & 658. For more Information Visit ActivityDirectorUniversity.org Send in a NAPT Course Enrollment Pack to get started! The NAPT course provides all the CE requirements for Path 1 or 2 See if you qualify! Check APNCC Standards Its your Choice! ...Your Affordable Choice ! While you are enrolled and working towards your, or any Accredited Certification Requirements you meet the F680 regulations set forth by the CMS.gov to insure each Activity Professional can complete their accrediting bodies standards. Here is the Federal Regulation For Activity Professionals from CMS.gov Most States do not have a State License or AD Register, these States are governed by F680 (most States) 483.24(c)(2) Section (ii) A . The Activities Program must be directed by a Activity Professional who is Eligible for Certification as a therapeutic recreation specialist or as an activities professional by a recognized accrediting body on or after Oct 1 1990.
  23. Fall Sensory Stimluation I don't know about you all, but I sure am looking forward to fall this year. The colorful leaves, the hot chocolate and apple cider, pumpkin pie candles, and don't even get me started with the beanies, scarves and boots!!!! I LOVE fall! Don't we all? And, if there were ever a time to embrace what we love and draw every little drop of happiness out of it, it is now. If Hallmark can bring us Christmas movies in the summer and Wal-Mart is stocking up with candy corn as we speak, who are we to say when the celebrating should begin? For our activities, I found a variety of ways to make edible acorns for visual and taste stimulation. These little guys are perfect for an easy activity with affordability, plus they are deliciously adorable. Further down, are some activities related to smell, touch and visual stimulation. This should give you a good mix of ideas for all levels of participation. Acorns 3 Ways Acorn Donut Holes Ingredients store-bought donut holes Nutella or chocolate frosting fall sprinkles stick pretzels broken in halves Full Recipe Nutter Butter Acorn Cookies Ingredients Nutter Butter Cookies Chocolate Almond Bard Chocolate Sprinkles Pretzel Sticks Full Recipe Candy Acorns Ingredients Mini Vanilla Wafers Chocolate Kisses Caramel Baking Chips Coconut Oil Full Recipe DIY Fall Wax Melts Materials ½ cup coconut oil ½ cup beeswax granules 2 tsp. ground cinnamon 2 tsp. whole cloves 2 tsp. vanilla Peel of 1 orange, diced Ice cube trays or small mold Glass jar with lid Get Directions Leaf Sensory Bags Supplies Sealable Bags Cooking Oil Liquid Water Colours Leaves Glitter Sequins and Spangles Get Directions Need Activity Calendars and Newsletter Templates for your Monthly Schedule - Join the ActivityCompanion.com "The Calendar Club" Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351
  24. Celebrate National Teddy Bear Day on September 9th! Celebrate by sewing teddy bears with your residents as gifts for the upcoming holiday season, for needy children in your community, or as comfort for residents with Alzheimer's or Dementia. Some basic sewing knowledge is necessary for reading patterns and the sewing process, however it is a fairly accessible project. Other suggested ideas are to create a Memory Bear by using clothes of a passed loved one or to use clothes outgrown by a child. Discuss with your residents which direction they would like to go in before you gather up the materials. This is a fun project with a great sense of accomplishment at the end! Materials: One yard of fabric for the body (I used cream color fleece, you can use normal hairy fur fabric too, I used fleece because these are for a little boy and a little girl, so I wanted the bears to be as soft as possible) 1/2 yard of fabric for the color details (I used light brown) One set of animal eyes 18mm a small piece of felt for the nose (you can use felt for the eyes too if gifting it to a baby- for safety reasons) Stuffing material (I used polyester filling) Sewing machine or thread and needle for hand-stitching Full Tutorial + Pattern The World's Most Expensive Teddy Bears Source: https://www.expensive-world.com/most-expensive-teddy-bear/ #11 Steiff Hot Water Bottle Teddy Bear – $ 40,358 This was the childhood bear of Mary Vernon Pegge born 24 September 1903 at the Elms, Briton Ferry, Wales. This teddy bear having been with her all her life. As the name suggests, this teddy bear can actually hold a tiny hot water bottle in the opening on the front of this teddy. Steiff produced these bears around 1907, but they never really caught on halting further production. Their rarity is has bumped up their worth, with one selling for 31,200 pounds or $40,358. #10 Happy Steiff Bear – $ 55,000 Even $ 55,000 is a huge sum, at least as far as teddy bears are concerned. Steiff’s merry mohair bear was produced as far back as 1926. In 1989, it was bought by Paul Volpp and given to his wife Rosemary for the 42nd wedding anniversary and a sign of endless love. #9 Harlequin Bear – $ 60,610 The teddy bear, made by Steiff in 1925, is the 8th most expensive teddy bear in the world. Because of the differently colored halves of his face, he was named Harlequin. This colorful critter may look playful, but his price is no joke. The rare bear was sold at Christie’s in 2010 for 46,850 pounds or $60,610. #8 Blue Elliot Bear – $ 64,200 It is assumed that Elliot was produced as a sample for the British department store, Harold’s. He would have been one of six different colored bears in the sample production. Unfortunately, Elliot never went on to full production, making any surviving examples extremely rare. In early December 1993, Elliot sold at an all-teddy-bear auction for £49,500 or $ 64,200. Accounting for inflation, that’s more than £95,000 today — or more than $160,000 at current conversion rates. #7 Diamond Eyes Bear – $ 84,000 Another prestigiously expensive teddy bear produced by the German toy house Steiff . Gold muzzle, sapphires and diamonds in place of eyes, fur interwoven with gold threads. This is what a teddy bear made by Steiff on the 125th anniversary of its successful operation looks like. There are only 125 collector pieces in the world. #6 Steiff’s Oldest Teddy Bear – $ 105,000 The bear, made in 1904, is the world’s oldest teddy bear. Like many bears on this list, it was made by Steiff. According to Reuters, it was sold in Germany in 2000 for an estimated $105,000. #5 Supreme Louis Vuitton Teddy Bear – $ 106,016 This Supreme x Louis Vuitton teddy bear is the pinnacle of fashion royalty branding and it went via auction overnight for a cool $106,016.08. As it stands, full proceeds from its final price will be used to benefit the BBC Children in Need — an organization aiming to ensure every child in the UK has a safe, happy and secure environment in which to grow. The doll is 100% authentic and certified from BBC Children in Need. #4 Steiff Titanic Mourning Bear – $ 136,000 In 1912, the first black fur Steiff teddies were manufactured to be given as mourning gifts after the sinking of the Titanic. They were made in five different sizes and only 665 bears were produced. In 2000, one of the mourning bears sold for $136,000 to the Puppenhaus Museum in Switzerland, according to The Telegraph. #3 Steiff Teddy Girl Bear – $ 143,000 When Colonel Bob Henderson was born in 1905, he was gifted with the Teddy Girl bear. During his successful career as Colonel in the British Army, he was sure to keep his favorite bear alongside himself. After Henderson had passed away in 1990, his Teddy Girl was sold at auction for over $143,000 in 1994, which is a record, according to Reuters. #2 Bear with Louis Vuitton monograms – $ 182,000 The second most expensive teddy bear in the world was made independently by fashion mogul Louis Vuitton. This teddy bear was created to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the LV brand. There are only 500 specimens of bears with the cute name DouDou. It was for sale in Monaco, the city of the rich. #1 Steiff Louis Vuitton Teddy Bear – $ 2.1 million The teddy bear, which was created by the moguls Louis Vuitton and Steiff, is the most expensive teddy bear in the world, as we have not yet recorded the existence of another teddy bear that would sell so well at auctions. The world-renowned fashion brand and toy manufacturer have worked together to create a teddy bear that exudes elegance and prestige. In 2000, the bear was sold at auction in Monaco, where it was bought by Korean Jessie Kim. It can currently be viewed at the Teddy Bear Museum in the Korean city of Jeju. Get Full Recipe HERE Ugly Ted, World's Ugliest Teddy Bear Over 300 ADN Nationally Certified Activity Directors so far this year! Are you ready for a Great Career! The Job Market is HOT! APNCC Your Affordable Choice! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351
  25. Do You Need APNCC.org PreApproved CEU's for Your National Certification Requirements View this email in your browser A fun night out to the movies no longer needs to include the 'out' part. Watching movies from the comfort of where you live has never been easier and it is an activity your residents will love. We don't want to just turn a movie on and walk off, though. Let's make it an event! A bunch of them in fact. I am talking about a Movie Month! Plan one movie night per week and go all out for it. Hand out tickets, serve popcorn, soda, candy, etc. Decorate the movie area so it feels like like leaving home. You can add curtains to each side of the TV, setup a ticket taking area, and hang movie posters. Get people hyped up for movie night all week by keeping the movie a secret. Each day make an announcement with one piece of trivia from the movie and let them all guess throughout the week, with the answer being revealed on the screen. Keep residents involved in the movie selection by having them all submit their choice and you can select 4 common ones from there. To maintain interest you could also serve a different treat each movie night. For example, coke floats, banana splits, ice cream cones, and sundaes. Below are some ideas to get your planning going! I found this free resource from familystrong.blogspot.com and created a printable page with a variety of tickets for you to print out and use. For best results print on card stock. Movie Ticket Printable Reveal Answers "The secret to 'stay crispy' popcorn is Clarified Butter." Once you have your clarified butter ready, make your popcorn using it and as a topping. The optional coloring mentioned is a mixture of turmeric and saffron. Click on either picture to view the full recipe. Get Full Recipe HERE Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2021 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2810 US HWY 190 W #100-A9 Livingston, Texas 77351 Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
  26. "Name that TV Show"

    Great 1950's nostalgic activity for reminiscing. 3 Pages of Trivia Style Fill-n-the Blank (includes a Bonus Trivia and Answer Sheet). PDF format.

    TVshow_PDFpack.jpg

    $1.50
  27. AlzheimerAwareness.doc View File File imported by an administrator Submitter Pennie Submitted 12/05/2011 Category Newsletters, Calendars, Forms, Puzzles, PrintOuts, FunFacts  
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