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Pennie

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  1. Do you have questions about infection control procedures? questions about masks, gowns, respirators, gloves and visiting room to room? This document outlines the Guidelines CMS.gov has issued to State Surveyors concerning State Inspections For Nursing Homes During the COVID-19 Outbreak. F-880 Take a minute to read the document and Print out Pages 10-28, the Nursing Home Checklist Tools, to help you evaluate your facility. Activity Directors Network NCCAP Approved MEPAP 1&2 Flexible Practicum Extension for COVID-19 Activity Director Courses Enroll Today! MEPAP Part I & MEPAP Part II Starts 1st Tuesday of Every Month - or - MEPAP Part I - OwnPace & MEPAP Part II - OwnPace Starts Any Time Take Up to a Year!
  2. COVID-19 Emergency Declaration Blanket Waivers for Health Care Providers A.D.N. will continue to provide updates from CMS to keep you informed. The following portions has been extracted from CMS bulletin to highlight areas of immediate concern to you – please see the following link for the full article. Source: https://www.cms.gov/files/document/summary-covid-19-emergency-declaration-waivers.pdf The following blanket waivers are in effect, with a retroactive effective date of March 1, 2020 through the end of the emergency declaration. For general information about waivers, see Attachment A to this document. These waivers DO NOT require a request to be sent to the 1135waiver@cms.hhs.gov mailbox or that notification be made to any of CMS’s regional offices. Long-Term Care Facilities and Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) and/or Nursing Facilities (NFs) 3-Day Prior Hospitalization. Using the authority under Section 1812(f) of the Act, CMS is waiving the requirement for a 3-day prior hospitalization for coverage of a SNF stay, which provides temporary emergency coverage of SNF services without a qualifying hospital stay, for those people who experience dislocations, or are otherwise affected by COVID-19. In addition, for certain beneficiaries who recently exhausted their SNF benefits, it authorizes renewed SNF coverage without first having to start a new benefit period (this waiver will apply only for those beneficiaries who have been delayed or prevented by the emergency itself from commencing or completing the process of ending their current benefit period and renewing their SNF benefits that would have occurred under normal circumstances). Reporting Minimum Data Set. CMS is waiving 42 CFR 483.20 to provide relief to SNFs on the timeframe requirements for Minimum Data Set assessments and transmission. Staffing Data Submission. CMS is waiving 42 CFR 483.70(q) to provide relief to long-term care facilities on the requirements for submitting staffing data through the Payroll-Based Journal system. Waive Pre-Admission Screening and Annual Resident Review (PASARR). CMS is waiving 42 CFR 483.20(k) allowing states and nursing homes to suspend these assessments for new residents for 30 days. After 30 days, new patients admitted to nursing homes with a mental illness (MI) or intellectual disability (ID) should receive the assessment as soon as resources become available Physical Environment. CMS is waiving requirements related at 42 CFR 483.90, specifically the following: - Provided that the state has approved the location as one that sufficiently addresses safety and comfort for patients and staff, CMS is waiving requirements under § 483.90 to allow for a non-SNF building to be temporarily certified and available for use by a SNF in the event there are needs for isolation processes for COVID-19 positive residents, which may not be feasible in the existing SNF structure to ensure care and services during treatment for COVID-19 are available while protecting other vulnerable adults. CMS believes this will also provide another measure that will free up inpatient care beds at hospitals for the most acute patients while providing beds for those still in need of care. CMS will waive certain conditions of participation and certification requirements for opening a NF if the state determines there is a need to quickly stand up a temporary COVID-19 isolation and treatment location. - CMS is also waiving requirements under 42 CFR 483.90 to temporarily allow for rooms in a long-term care facility not normally used as a resident’s room, to be used to accommodate beds and residents for resident care in emergencies and situations needed to help with surge capacity. Rooms that may be used for this purpose include activity rooms, meeting/conference rooms, dining rooms, or other rooms, as long as residents can be kept safe, comfortable, and other applicable requirements for participation are met. This can be done so long as it is not inconsistent with a state’s emergency preparedness or pandemic plan, or as directed by the local or state health department. Resident Groups. CMS is waiving the requirements at 42 CFR 483.10(f)(5), which ensure residents can participate in-person in resident groups. This waiver would only permit the facility to restrict in-person meetings during the national emergency given the recommendations of social distancing and limiting gatherings of more than ten people. Refraining from in-person gatherings will help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Resident roommates and grouping. CMS is waiving the requirements in 42 CFR 483.10(e) (5), (6), and (7) solely for the purposes of grouping or cohorting residents with respiratory illness symptoms and/or residents with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19, and separating them from residents who are asymptomatic or tested negative for COVID-19. This action waives a facility’s requirements, under 42 CFR 483.10, to provide for a resident to share a room with his or her roommate of choice in certain circumstances, to provide notice and rationale for changing a resident’s room, and to provide for a resident’s refusal a transfer to another room in the facility. This aligns with CDC guidance to preferably place residents in locations designed to care for COVID-19 residents, to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 to other residents Home Health Agencies (HHAs) Requests for Anticipated Payment (RAPs). CMS is allowing Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs) to extend the auto-cancellation date of Requests for Anticipated Payment (RAPs) during emergencies. Reporting. CMS is providing relief to HHAs on the timeframes related to OASIS Transmission through the following actions below: - Extending the 5-day completion requirement for the comprehensive assessment to 30 days. - Waiving the 30-day OASIS submission requirement. Delayed submission is permitted during the PHE. 13 Initial Assessments. CMS is waiving the requirements at 42 CFR §484.55(a) to allow HHAs to perform Medicare-covered initial assessments and determine patients’ homebound status remotely or by record review. This will allow patients to be cared for in the best environment for them while supporting infection control and reducing impact on acute care and longterm care facilities. This will allow for maximizing coverage by already scarce physician and advanced practice clinicians and allow those clinicians to focus on caring for patients with the greatest acuity. Waive onsite visits for HHA Aide Supervision. CMS is waiving the requirements at 42 CFR §484.80(h), which require a nurse to conduct an onsite visit every two weeks. This would include waiving the requirements for a nurse or other professional to conduct an onsite visit every two weeks to evaluate if aides are providing care consistent with the care plan, as this may not be physically possible for a period of time. This waiver is also temporarily suspending the 2-week aide supervision by a registered nurse for home health agencies requirement at §484.80(h)(1), but virtual supervision is encouraged during the period of the waiver. Read Full Article Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network.
  3. Here is an industrious undertaking.. UnityPoint Healthcare has provide a website with details for making a new modular mask, The Olson, named after 1930's legendary maker nurse Lyla Mae Olson. The Mask was quickly developed by clinicians from UnityPoint Health and is being shared across the globe in the fight against COVID19 St Lukes Hospitals are in short supply of masks. UnityPoint Health has provided downloadable patterns, YouTube Videos, and complete instructions on how to Sew, Package and Send completed Masks to the St. Lukes Hospitals. ---------------- https://www.unitypoint.org/cedarrapids/sewing-surgical-masks.aspx -------------- Completed Masks Enclose completed masks in a closed plastic bag or closed plastic box. We will launder them prior to use so no need to wash before delivering. Please deliver to the St. Luke's Foundation, 855 A Ave. NE, 1st floor, Cedar Rapids. Phone (319) 369-7716.
  4. Article reprinted with permission: QUARANTINE ACTIVITY GUIDE Posted on March 19, 2020 by ElderSong The COVID-19 coronavirus, which is sweeping across our nation, has certainly caused many of our usual activities and routines to cease. Our government is asking Americans to keep their distance and stay home in order to contain this devastating virus. For many of you, this means that your facility is on lock down. Family members may not be allowed to visit their loved ones. Your usual group activities may have had to halt for a time. Your members may be feeling anxious, worried, and unsure. In this time of uncertainty, we want to support you, the activity people. That's why we created this special edition activity guide to help support you and your group as our nation and world faces this pandemic. Below you'll find a list of one-on-one activities, as well as a few other non-traditional group activities to help you raise morale. Please adapt as needed. Let the other departments in your facility know your activity plans, and then follow your company's policies and procedures during this emergency. DAILY BOOST – There are so many good stories happening as a result of the COVID-19 global pandemic. Look for a positive story to share with members as you visit room to room. Share a video you find on social media, an inspiring quote, or a heart-warming story. Speaking of boosts, be sure to share (with permission) positive stories that are happening in your community. With many people turning to social media, it's a great time to flood newsfeeds with positive stories and reassure family members that their loved ones are doing well. GO LIVE – Many institutes, celebrities, and programs are taking their talents live on social media in order to boost morale all over the world. Join the going-live movement and interview members of your community. The senior population has lived through WWII and has a lot of wisdom to offer the younger population. With permission, invite members to go live with you. Advertise ahead of time so that your audience knows when to tune in. Then, select members to discuss various topics, such as how they survived WWII, parenting suggestions for multiple children, tried-and-true recipes that use common ingredients, or other advice to help Americans through this crisis. REMINISCING – Now is a great time to reminisce with members about WWII or the Korean War. Questions to prompt discussion include: Where were you during most of the war? Did you or any family members serve? Where were they stationed? What was everyday life like? How did you stay updated regarding war efforts? What do you remember eating? What was rationing like and how did your family handle rations? How did you guide your young children through the wartime? How did you hear that the war was over? Do you remember where you were, or what you were doing or wearing? How long did it take for life to get back to normal after the war? IN-ROOM BINGO – Keep the fun going by offering in-room Bingo, especially if your members can't gather for usual activities. Copy your regular Bingo cards so that participants can use a pen to mark their individual cards, reducing the risk of spreading germs. Ask members to sit near their doors while you walk down the hallway, calling out the numbers. Play with just one wing at a time, and schedule other Bingo games for other hallways, so that everyone has a chance to play. If your facility has an in-house TV channel, put the numbers on the screen and ask participants to tune in to the appropriate channel. HALLWAY SING-ALONGS – Boost morale with a hallway sing-along. Gather participants to their doors and play their favorite sing-along music. Encourage members to sing-along or just enjoy listening to the voices of their neighbors. ZIPLOCK CRAFTS – Sort through your craft supplies and create individual crafts that members can do in their rooms, or that you can do one-on-one with them. Include all the supplies needed, such as glue sticks, stickers, markers, etc. Be mindful of your participants and only give the kits to those who can follow instructions. Work one-on-one with those who need assistance. If you don't have a lot of supplies right now, copy adult coloring pages and encourage members to color in their room. CREATE A STAINED GLASS PANEL – Work one-on-one with members to create individual stained glass panels, then display them as a collective piece of artwork on your community's front windows to boost morale. You'll need contact paper, colored tissue paper in all sorts of colors, and black construction paper. Start by cutting a rectangular frame out of the construction paper, about 1/2 inch thick, as large as you want. Cut two pieces of contact paper the same size as your frame, but leave them whole (do not remove the center). With your participant, peel off one of the backings to the contact paper, laying it sticky side up on a table. Place the black frame on top of the sticky side. Then, tear small sections of the tissue paper and ask the participant to arrange it how they desire. Fill the entire panel. Peel the backing off the second piece of contact paper and carefully place it on top, sealing the panel together. Make two panels with each participant. Secure one panel in the window of the participant so they can enjoy it. Use the second panel to create your community stained glass window. TAKE A VIRTUAL RIDE – Walt Disney World may be closed, but that doesn't mean that participants can't enjoy a virtual ride. Head over to Romper.com for links to rides. Then, share one-on-one and take the time to reminisce about thrill rides, amusement parks, Disney World, fairs, and more. Ask about their first roller coaster or theme park: What was the name of the ride or park? Where was it? Do you prefer rides that spin or rides that offer bigger thrills? How much did a ticket to their the park cost? Is it still open? TRAVEL TO A MUSEUM – In addition to virtual rides, many museums across the world are offering virtual tours. During one-on-ones, ask participants about their favorite museum and visit, virtually, with them. Use a laptop or tablet to share images. Reminisce about their travels to the museum: Who did you go with? What did you like most about it? What memories does this virtual tour evoke? TUNE IN LIVE – As mentioned above, many celebrities, artists, institutes and more are sharing free, live programs that you can share one-on-one with participants. Search on social media for art classes, book clubs, concerts and more. Then, schedule one-on-one visits according to individual participant preferences. For example, if you have someone who loves art, bring a drawing pad and pencil with you and follow along to a live drawing class. Someone who prefers reading might appreciate being a part of a virtual book club. It might take a little effort on your part to coordinate schedules, but it will be worth the great boost to morale. IN-HOUSE FITNESS – Keep participants active by offering in-house fitness classes. If you have an in-house TV channel, record a fitness video that can be shared over the TV. If you don't, invite participants to join in from their doorways, in smaller groups. Sit in the center so they can hear and see you, and lead them in a condensed version of your usual fitness classes. Then, move down the hallway and repeat with the next group. Be mindful of blocking the hallway; stand if necessary, so that you can quickly move out of the way if there is an emergency. ADVERTISE WAYS OTHERS CAN HELP – Turn to social media to share ways the community can support and encourage your group. If your facility permits, accept handmade cards or pictures from children. Distribute to participants, or display them throughout the hallways. If members have access to a balcony, perhaps a musical family could give a private concert while keeping a safe distance. If your facility is near a neighborhood, encourage families to walk by and wave to your participants. A little note or gesture could go a long way to boost morale during this pandemic. UTILIZE VIDEO CALLS – If you aren't already doing this, be sure to offer video calls so that participants can stay connected with their families. Provide members' families with information on how to request a video chat with their loved one. If participants have a smart phone, teach them how to make a video call during your one-on-one visits. SET UP A WINDOW VISIT BOOTH – For families who live locally, set up a window visit booth so that members can visit in person. Designate a certain window on the first floor where families can drop by to visit. Ask members to use their cell phones, or use a regular phone, being sure to follow proper disinfection protocol between users. MINDFUL MEDITATIONS – Help participants combat anxiety and fear by leading them through mindful meditations during your one-on-one visits. Start by instructing the participant to find a comfortable position in a chair or bed and close his or her eyes. Then read a guided meditation from your favorite resource. Use a Bluetooth speaker to play soft, calming music in the background. Properly disinfect the speaker after each room visit. (Some people with hearing loss may hear the meditation better without the background music.) BRING THE OUTSIDE IN – If members cannot get outside due to strict quarantine guidelines, bring the outside in for them to enjoy. Here are a few ideas you can do during one-on-one visits. Plant a window sill herb garden. Grow grass in a plastic basket for Easter. Give each member a small houseplant to take care of during the quarantine. Place bird feeders near windows to attract wildlife. Watch nature DVDs with participants or take a virtual hike through a national park. As spring arrives, take pictures and share with members. GRATITUDE JOURNALS – Give participants a small journal and encourage them to take a moment each day to write one thing they are grateful for. Encourage them to think of different, unique experiences or moments from that particular day, instead of writing the same thing each day. AFTER-THE-QUARANTINE BUCKET LIST – Start a running list of what participants are most looking forward to once life returns to normal. Display the list in your activity room or common space and update it whenever someone has a new idea. Once the pandemic subsides, be sure to cross off items as participants engage in the activity. Use the list to guide your future activity planning. SUPPORTING THOSE WITH MEMORY LOSS – Individuals with memory loss may be most susceptible to feeling anxious and afraid during this global pandemic. They might not understand why their loved ones aren't visiting, or may not comprehend the scope and severity of the coronavirus. The best way to support those with memory loss is to try to maintain some sense of routine and normalcy with them. Lead smaller groups if permitted. Take them for short walks in a safe area. Keep them busy by asking them to fold towels, sort items, or organize cabinets. Limit their access to the daily news. Read short stories with them and ease their anxiety through humor. Sit down and enjoy a cup of tea or decaf coffee with them. Encourage them to rest in the afternoon. Be mindful of your own feelings and conversations with other employees. Members with memory loss may not understand the global pandemic, but they will pick up on anxiety in conversations. Ask employees working with memory loss members to be present and to save certain conversations for the break room. A QUOTE TO INSPIRE YOU "Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does." ~ William James "Quarantine Activity Guide" was written by Erin McCart. Copyright 2020 ElderSong Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprint Policy: To reprint or republish all or portions of this entry, you must acquire written permission and agree to link back to the original source. Please contact us at newsletter@eldersong.com to obtain permission. Visit ElderSong Disposable BINGO cards to help keep your facility safe. FREE BINGO Packs For the time being, we think it is best if you have all the help you can get free of charge. Please peruse our Member's Activity Database and take any inspiration you can from it to help you plan your days. Activity Database Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident's individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2020 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351 Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
  5. Hey All.. here is a unique way to get a scheduled Sing-A-Long activity on the calendar. Rob Crozier from Michigan, is a Sing-a-long entertainer in Senior care. He has put a demo of his program up on youtube. Schedule a Hallway Sing-A-Long for each afternoon at 3: I love it, Let me know what you think and contact Rob for more info on his program. We need a few days of song.. He seems like a hard working creative guy, Activity Director material... thanks Pennie ROB CROZIER ( ROBCROZIER123@GMAIL.COM ) Website - Youtube Channel Hello, I am an Ann Arbor, MI music professional with a specialty in sing a longs and senior entertainment. As you may know, musician gigs are all cancelled in Michigan. I was wondering if it would be possible to share the work that I'm doing with your community? I'm offering a full sing a long program for one month with unlimited use for $100 per facility. The video is ready as a Youtube link that can easily be played back like this demo: https://youtu.be/ZC4TiSqzxYg As you may know all "Outside Entertainers" have been cancelled and as Senior Home Musicians we are trying to get creative. I’m worked out a new platform of "Online Entertainers" a Sing-A-Long YouTube Presentation video for a month’s use, perfect for scheduled activities several times throughout the month , great way to economize). You get to use it for a full month for $100. Are you interested in my Sing a Long youtube link? Let me know if you can put this to use. These videos take about 8 hours to record, edit, mix and upload. Just so you know that I’ve put some thought and hard work into this product. Feel free to send any feedback, or if you are running into hardship, you can pay whatever is affordable. Here is a demo: https://youtu.be/ZC4TiSqzxYg All the best, Rob Website - Youtube Channel
  6. Movie News .. New Release Movies will change to "Video On Demand Programming" to help with Social Distancing. Universal - The Hunt, Ema and The Invisible Man Goto "On Demand" on Friday. Check your cable or satellite for days and prices. Trolls World Tour , still pending for working moms with kids home... https://news.google.com/articles/CAIiEB1HnokAxrRfqYh8Sct994IqFggEKg0IACoGCAowoPUEMKAjMP6Y1gU?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US%3Aen
  7. HIPAA for Activity Directors written by Celeste Chase Activities professionals deal with resident information on a personal level, including but not limited to: family issues, special requests from the resident, newsletter articles, etc. Without a doubt, there is a great deal of detailed personal information that must be monitored to prevent unintended disclosure. The following information will hopefully ease your mind about HIPAA regulations. That way, you will be able to have your calendars, banners, bulletin boards and posters, while being in full compliance with all of the regulations. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), Public Law 104-191, was enacted on August 21, 1996. It details standards for the electronic exchange, privacy and security of health information. These guidelines were initially designed to regulate "individually identifiable" - health information that was transmitted electronically. Since then, the "Privacy Rule" that is defined by HIPAA has expanded that concept. Covered Entities "must" be HIPAA Compliant HIPAA, or Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act of 1996, covers both individuals and organizations. Those who must comply with HIPAA are often called HIPAA-covered entities. This information will focused on Health Care Providers known as nursing homes - specifically health care professionals in the role as Activity Directors. Some of these entities are: Health care providers such as nursing homes, rehab facilities, hospitals or any other facility providing skilled or intensive care. Other entities also included are: Health Plans, Health Care Clearinghouses, and Business associates. Not sure if you are working in a Covered Entity; download this PDF for more details check the following resources. Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Administrative-Simplification/HIPAA-ACA/Downloads/CoveredEntitiesChart20160617.pdf Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Administrative-Simplification/HIPAA-ACA/AreYouaCoveredEntity Personal Health Information (PHI) The specific information targeted under the HIPAA regulations is data known as: "Personal Health Information" or PHI. This would be any data that provides "Individually identifiable health information" - including demographic data. PHI information may be received or created by a facility. It may contain past, present or future health diagnosis, history and/or treatment and is inclusive of payment information for medical services normally found in medical charts and billing files. Portions of such personal information may often be found on bulletin boards, photos, calendars, birthday cards, activity rooms, common areas and activity progress notes. The Nuts and Bolts for Directors There are several ways to keep your department and resident's privacy intact and remain in compliance with HIPAA regulations. Staff orientation must include appropriate training in this area across all interdisciplinary team members. When is PHI distribution approved under HIPAA? There are different allowable ways to exchange medical information. Generally, the facility may provide select PHI details to family members, friends and clergy. The resident's name and room number. The general condition of the resident: - Having a good day today. - Asked to attend sing-a-long group. - Has been a little sad today. The residents' religious affiliation. Note: Be sure to check if your residents have authorized a legal "Health Care Proxy". This appointed person or persons can stipulate the dissemination of any health information or may over-ride permissions as to whom this personal information may be given. That said, the following are scenarios in which you are not allowed to disclose medical information in any circumstances: Never walk away from your computer, laptop or other electronic health record device without shutting down or entering sleep command to close your screen. It is never permissible to momentarily walk away to tend to another matter while leaving personal information visible on your screen. Never carry on conversations in areas lacking privacy within the facility between staff members. There will never be any circumstance when you should discuss or comment about your resident's day within open areas in which the conversation might be accidently overheard; such areas could be hallways, bathrooms, etc. REMEMBER: "THE WALLS HAVE EARS" Any inbound or outbound resident health information whether fax, email, completed forms, and standard mail. Any document must be immediately addressed upon receipt. Under no circumstances should any health information be allowed to remain in waiting within view on your desk, fax machine or open file organizer until you can tend to it. Activity Plans, Bulletin Boards and Other Publications Photographs/Pictures: Ensure that a permission form has been signed by the authorized individual and is filed in the resident's chart. This permission form is mandatory if you plan to take resident pictures. However, once you include the resident's name with that picture, you will be in violation of HIPAA. If you need to use a name (on a bulletin board for example) all you really need to do is ask the resident for permission and document that permission was given. Calendars and Birthday Cards: Simply remove the birth year from any information. You may only provide the residents name, month and day of birth within the given month. For example: Happy Birthday to Teddy – (3/21). It goes without saying that you should never include medical information (diagnoses, dementia items, etc.) on your monthly calendars. Bulletin Boards and Miscellaneous: Documented permissions are worth their weight in gold. In almost every case if you take the proper steps to ask permission, you can prevent any confusion and facility privacy citation during survey. Never add names to pictures. If you absolutely must, be sure to get explicit permission and again document that it was given. However, I would suggest you to steer clear of adding names period to prevent possible confusion. Activity Rooms and Common Areas: Can pictures of residents be used in your common areas? Yes, but once more, be sure that no medical information accompanies those pictures. Additionally, never identify residents by room or unit, especially if that resident resides on a memory/dementia care unit. This information is simply not needed to convey the resident experience through pictures. Activity and Progress Notes: As previously stated, completed resident forms should never lie in waiting, inclusive of all progress notes. These forms must be put away in the individual chart to prevent unwanted viewing of resident privacy information. Never leave it out in the open on your desk to attend to another matter. The only exception would be when you are able to secure (lock) the document in an office. Shreddables Pure and Simple...you bear the responsibility of ensuring that no "unauthorized" eyes are able to view resident health information. This also applies to any documentation that is no longer required for record retention. "Record retention guidelines" outline how long resident & treatment records must be retained. Records deemed to expire must be permanently disposed of by way of shredding. Always check with your facility Administrator to ensure your understanding of how and when shredding services are utilized by your facility. The major goal of the Privacy Rule is to assure that individuals' health information is properly protected while allowing the flow of health information needed to provide and promote high quality health care and to protect the public's health and well being. Source: https://managemypractice.com/cms-releases-record-retention-guidelines/?print=print Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/CMSRecordsSchedule For more detailed HIPAA information: https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/privacy/laws-regulations/index.html https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/training/index.html Written By Celeste Chase Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved.
  8. HIPAA for Activity Directors Activities professionals deal with resident information on a personal level, including but not limited to: family issues, special requests from the resident, newsletter articles, etc. Without a doubt, there is a great deal of detailed personal information that must be monitored to prevent unintended disclosure. The following information will hopefully ease your mind about HIPAA regulations. That way, you will be able to have your calendars, banners, bulletin boards and posters, while being in full compliance with all of the regulations. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), Public Law 104-191, was enacted on August 21, 1996. It details standards for the electronic exchange, privacy and security of health information. These guidelines were initially designed to regulate "individually identifiable" - health information that was transmitted electronically. Since then, the "Privacy Rule" that is defined by HIPAA has expanded that concept. Covered Entities "must" be HIPAA Compliant HIPAA, or Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act of 1996, covers both individuals and organizations. Those who must comply with HIPAA are often called HIPAA-covered entities. This information will focused on Health Care Providers known as nursing homes - specifically health care professionals in the role as Activity Directors. Some of these entities are: Health care providers such as nursing homes, rehab facilities, hospitals or any other facility providing skilled or intensive care. Other entities also included are: Health Plans, Health Care Clearinghouses, and Business associates. Not sure if you are working in a Covered Entity; download this PDF for more details check the following resources. Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Administrative-Simplification/HIPAA-ACA/Downloads/CoveredEntitiesChart20160617.pdf Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Administrative-Simplification/HIPAA-ACA/AreYouaCoveredEntity Personal Health Information (PHI) The specific information targeted under the HIPAA regulations is data known as: "Personal Health Information" or PHI. This would be any data that provides "Individually identifiable health information" - including demographic data. PHI information may be received or created by a facility. It may contain past, present or future health diagnosis, history and/or treatment and is inclusive of payment information for medical services normally found in medical charts and billing files. Portions of such personal information may often be found on bulletin boards, photos, calendars, birthday cards, activity rooms, common areas and activity progress notes. The Nuts and Bolts for Directors There are several ways to keep your department and resident's privacy intact and remain in compliance with HIPAA regulations. Staff orientation must include appropriate training in this area across all interdisciplinary team members. When is PHI distribution approved under HIPAA? There are different allowable ways to exchange medical information. Generally, the facility may provide select PHI details to family members, friends and clergy. The resident's name and room number. The general condition of the resident: - Having a good day today. - Asked to attend sing-a-long group. - Has been a little sad today. The residents' religious affiliation. Note: Be sure to check if your residents have authorized a legal "Health Care Proxy". This appointed person or persons can stipulate the dissemination of any health information or may over-ride permissions as to whom this personal information may be given. That said, the following are scenarios in which you are not allowed to disclose medical information in any circumstances: Never walk away from your computer, laptop or other electronic health record device without shutting down or entering sleep command to close your screen. It is never permissible to momentarily walk away to tend to another matter while leaving personal information visible on your screen. Never carry on conversations in areas lacking privacy within the facility between staff members. There will never be any circumstance when you should discuss or comment about your resident's day within open areas in which the conversation might be accidently overheard; such areas could be hallways, bathrooms, etc. REMEMBER: "THE WALLS HAVE EARS" Any inbound or outbound resident health information whether fax, email, completed forms, and standard mail. Any document must be immediately addressed upon receipt. Under no circumstances should any health information be allowed to remain in waiting within view on your desk, fax machine or open file organizer until you can tend to it. Activity Plans, Bulletin Boards and Other Publications Photographs/Pictures: Ensure that a permission form has been signed by the authorized individual and is filed in the resident's chart. This permission form is mandatory if you plan to take resident pictures. However, once you include the resident's name with that picture, you will be in violation of HIPAA. If you need to use a name (on a bulletin board for example) all you really need to do is ask the resident for permission and document that permission was given. Calendars and Birthday Cards: Simply remove the birth year from any information. You may only provide the residents name, month and day of birth within the given month. For example: Happy Birthday to Teddy – (3/21). It goes without saying that you should never include medical information (diagnoses, dementia items, etc.) on your monthly calendars. Bulletin Boards and Miscellaneous: Documented permissions are worth their weight in gold. In almost every case if you take the proper steps to ask permission, you can prevent any confusion and facility privacy citation during survey. Never add names to pictures. If you absolutely must, be sure to get explicit permission and again document that it was given. However, I would suggest you to steer clear of adding names period to prevent possible confusion. Activity Rooms and Common Areas: Can pictures of residents be used in your common areas? Yes, but once more, be sure that no medical information accompanies those pictures. Additionally, never identify residents by room or unit, especially if that resident resides on a memory/dementia care unit. This information is simply not needed to convey the resident experience through pictures. Activity and Progress Notes: As previously stated, completed resident forms should never lie in waiting, inclusive of all progress notes. These forms must be put away in the individual chart to prevent unwanted viewing of resident privacy information. Never leave it out in the open on your desk to attend to another matter. The only exception would be when you are able to secure (lock) the document in an office. Shreddables Pure and Simple...you bear the responsibility of ensuring that no "unauthorized" eyes are able to view resident health information. This also applies to any documentation that is no longer required for record retention. "Record retention guidelines" outline how long resident & treatment records must be retained. Records deemed to expire must be permanently disposed of by way of shredding. Always check with your facility Administrator to ensure your understanding of how and when shredding services are utilized by your facility. The major goal of the Privacy Rule is to assure that individuals' health information is properly protected while allowing the flow of health information needed to provide and promote high quality health care and to protect the public's health and well being. Source: https://managemypractice.com/cms-releases-record-retention-guidelines/?print=print Source: https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/CMSRecordsSchedule For more detailed HIPAA information: https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/privacy/laws-regulations/index.html https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/training/index.html Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident's individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  9. Hi Everyone!! Or, As the Irish in Ireland say "Dia Dhuit! (May God Be With You!) Well I trust you all had a lovely weekend, what with Valentine's Day and Presidents Day.. !! Chocolates, flowers, dinner out.... clothes, furniture, sales, it's all good! Time spent with loved ones or shopping.. it's the American way! So, the clock is ticking! This past Sunday makes it one month away from our Big Irish Extravaganza! and yes, I finally got my green outfit! Not an easy feat.. green is not exactly the most popular color I find.. and i have been searching for weeks!! It helps me to get in the mood and excited for putting on our shows... So I'm excited now!! Are you getting excited yet? To wear your green, to laugh, to sing, to celebrate a Holiday that brings the spirit of a country and a culture to life?.. I am! There are many reasons to associate green with Ireland and by extension with its Saint Patricks Day games and traditions. Green is one of the colors in Ireland's tri-color flag. It is also the color most typically associated with the classic Irish symbol, the shamrock, and of course Ireland herself is frequently referred to by her nickname, the "Emerald Isle." And did you know that Ireland is the home of the Limerick. It's said that Limericks were invented in the 18th century by an Irish brigade when they were returning from France. They sang a song with a chorus about Limerick, an Irish port city. Impromptu verses were added. Each verse was about adventures of people from other Irish towns. The verses had to be invented on the spur of the moment, each line by a different singer. After each verse the whole group sang the chorus, "will you come back to Limerick?".. so began Limericks! Who knew!!?? Here's two for you when you're having a cocktail to remember! .. An Irishman name of Pat Sweeney, In Nice drank a quart of Martini. The local gendarme, Wired his wife in alarm, "Nous regrettons Pat Sweeney est fini." . Some merry old monks of Manulla, Found life was becoming much dulla. So they brewed a fine ale, in a massive big pail, And they and their lives were much fulla. Nevertheless,.. ticket sales are percolating so get yours now while they're hot! And remember, we're not just comedy, we've got our Irish dancers, musicians, and we love celebrating birthdays so come celebrate your lives with us! And that's no blarney! Hope I've made you laugh and think this week! Have yourself a grand one! Always, or Mise Le Meas! (Sincerely in Gaelic) I Live to Laugh! Bonnie Barchichat Executive Producer Senior Comedy Afternoons.com GO HERE FOR TICKETS! 714-914.2565 Or CALL! P.S. Please share this email with friends who can use some more fun, laughter and sociability in their life. P.P.S. Sponsors.. If you're Senior Friendly and want to meet our Audience here's your opportunity! Drop me a line and say "tell me more!" www.Here's the Proud Bird! Don't forget to email me what you'd like to have for lunch! All orders must be in by March 9th! ©2020 Senior Comedy Afternoons LLC. | 2313 Nelson Avenue, Redondo Beach, Ca. 90278
  10. Hi.. Don Weitz wrote to the Activity Directors Network sometime last week asking to share his Contact Info with Activity Directors in the Dallas Fort Worth for -- Facility Entertainer - Pianist - Available -- . If you have ever been to the Highland Park Cafeteria , than you've probably enjoyed his music, he plays there 2-3 times a week. Please visit the Cafeteria, it is Amazing made better by Don's accompaniment .. https://highlandparkcafeteria.com/ Plan an Outing... seriously... If you would like Don at your facility, send him an email .. Go ahead and call around for recommendations, he was at the The Legacy at Willow Bend Memory Care, Independent Living and Rehab, The Reserve, Sunrise on Hillcrest, Briarview, and the Jewish Community Center of Dallas over the last couple of months.... here is his bio , in his own words.. "I am a pianist and I entertain at several retirement communities in the Dallas / Plano / Richardson areas, though I would be happy to expand beyond those cities. Over the past few months, I have played at Edgemere, The Legacy at Willow Bend Memory Care, Independent Living and Rehab, The Reserve, Sunrise on Hillcrest, Briarview, and for seniors at the Jewish Community Center of Dallas. Playing for Memory Care is especially uplifting as residents often start singing along with songs they knew 50+ years ago. I am a regular pianist at Highland Park Cafeteria and entertain there 12-15 times a month. My repertoire consists mainly of popular music from the 1960s. My clients like that this appeals to residents and diners 65+ years old. Folks were in their teens and 20s during the 1960s and often comment, "Thanks for the memories, I haven't heard that song since I was in high school!" I recently performed a promoted “1960s Night” at Highland Park Cafeteria. I play by ear, and can easily customize my music list to include hits of the 1950s and earlier, as well as songs from the 70s and later. I establish rapport with the residents by telling the names of the songs and if I know a bit of trivia, sharing that as well, such as when originally recorded and by whom. Other than your piano, I require no additional equipment. I’ll be glad to come by and play a tune or two on the piano and discuss how I may be of service. Please contact Don Weitz at donsweitz@gmail.com. “Wouldn’t it be Nice” to have a special oldies performance!"
  11. Theories of Aging People have always been obsessed with aging. Whether it’s to prolong life, make sense of disease or disability, to extract wisdom or to add meaning into the process, aging is generally at the forefront of all cultures throughout time. A look back into history show all kinds of rituals based on again and potions to grant eternal life abound. Still today you can find thousands of anti-aging products for the skin, brain, mind, and/or body in general. One of the most valuable reasons we should research Theories of Aging is so that we can understand what is happening emotionally and psychologically for the resident so that we can help introduce a better quality of life in a more empathetic manner. As we cover some of the theories put forth, consider of some of your own theories that you have gathered throughout your career and life experiences. Once we connect al the dots it will make it easier for you to relate to your residents and plan on their behalf. Biological Theories of Aging Biological Theories of Aging focus on the aging process of the human organism itself. It was long believed that the body experiences a dramatic loss of cognitive and physical abilities were pretty much inevitable. However, research and studies have largely disproved this. In fact, many individuals lose very little ability. This is incredibly comforting to me as I am sure it is to you and your residents. Belief is a strong factor in quality of life. If a resident believe they will hit a certain age and begin to breakdown it could lend energy to that manifestation unnecessarily. There are 3 primary biological theories of aging: The Nutrition Theory on Aging This is one of the oldest theories, however its level of obvious intelligence has increased as our knowledge of the importance of nutrition has increased as a society. This involves acquiring an adequate amount of vitamins and minerals across a variety of sources to maintain health. The correlation between eating healthy and prolonging life while deterring disease and disability has been documented for thousands of years, and is now backed by extensive science. It is known that many disease thought to be age related are in fact nutrition related and may be minimized or even prevented all together with correct nutritional intake. Teacher’s Tip: Knowledge is power. Explore topics of nutrition and health with your residents so that they may be empowered to take action. At the very least this information can provide hope which goes a long way in all situations. Try and provide healthy snacks for your residents and create activities that focus on health. Food and its corresponding effect on aging may be common sense to our generation, however, it wasn’t so common in the last couple of generations. This may be a hurdle you will have to navigate and education is the best tool in your arsenal. Pinterest has many pins featuring elderly individual’s tackling marathons, weight lifting and all kinds of other endeavors that may seem impossible without direct proof. Offer that proof and get your residents motivated. Activity Idea: Host a marathon at your facility. Start with a 5k and see how things go. Eventually you could make it a long marathon or add in different events, obstacles, or themes to mix it up. Invite staff and family members to join you and your residents. You could even utilize this as a fundraising event and raise money to buy exercise equipment for your residents. Residents that cannot participate could be involved by setting up and running a water stand, making healthy snacks for after the race, creating signs of encouragement and taking photos for the local newspaper and/or your newsletter. The Environmental Theory on Aging This theory deals directly with the physical environment around the individual. Air quality, population, isolation, location and/or relocation, viruses, smoking, travel, social/cultural stress, etc falls under this theory as factors that affect aging. Listed within this category is the effects of being moved out of one’s own home and into a nursing facility. As you can imagine, this is a tough pill to swallow, so to speak. Teacher’s Tip: One of the primary negative feelings associated with moving into a nursing facility is the sense of losing purpose in life and being a burden. There are ways that we may be able to help counter react these types of feelings. Perhaps you could organize a welcome committee that meets with new residents and allows for a discussion on this topic and others that are relevant. This will help the new resident to realize they are not along and their feelings are completely normal. It will also help them to see that other residents have experienced and successfully moved through these feelings into a life that does hold new meaning. It may also be a good idea to create ‘resident jobs’ and encourage new residents to sign up for different tasks or to create new tasks based on their individual backgrounds. The Genetic Factors Theory on Aging This theory deals directly in DNA and states that genetics will determine how one lives and for how long. However, a new area of study called epigenetics states that genetics is really only responsible for a small amount of gene mutations and in fact the individual is the key component as to whether a disease will develop or not. Previously, we believed we were prisoners to our genetics and we were going to develop what we were going to develop, regardless of our own actions. Epigenetics says that our genetics predispose us to certain diseases, but we determine whether the switch gets flipped to on or off with our physical, emotional and mental habits/choices. Again, this is empowering and relieving information to pass along. Teacher’s Tip: This theory lends itself to the category of preventive medicine in my mind. Utilizing the health history of your resident and their family members you can see what they may be predisposed to should the switch get flipped on. This means you could research preventative measures against a specific disease and help your resident to get on a routine that is designed specifically for their DNA. This is by no means a scientific plan or theory on my part. It is simply an educated leap as to how this information may be applied beneficially. In Conclusion... Biological factors are a huge component to the aging process and failing health is certainly prohibitive to leading a fulfilling life. The huge takeaway here is that many of these factors are under our control to a point. Through understanding the processes we can develop plans of action to counter react or prevent that which is preventable. Knowledge is power and can be highly motivating. I suggest you gather your interested residents and discuss these varied biological factors and get their feedback. Discuss other contributing biological factors that may not have been recognized. Empower your residents to take this information and turn it into personal strength and accountability. Tune in Next Week as we continue our discussion with the Psychological Theories of Aging.
  12. For Your Stomach Irish Cheese and Bacon Popcorn Source: https://www.chocolatemoosey.com/2014/01/07/irish-cheese-and-bacon-popcorn/ Yield: 6-8 This popcorn is best eaten the day it is made, so if you are making this for a party, grate the cheese ahead of time then toss together at the last minute. Ingredients 7 cups salted popcorn (roughly 1/3 cup unpopped kernels) 1/4 cup butter, melted 1/4 cup crumbled bacon 1 cup finely grated Irish cheese Instructions In a large bowl, toss together the popcorn, butter, bacon, and cheese. Popcorn is best eaten the day it's made. For Your Fun Shamrock Mason Jars Source: https://masonjarcraftslove.com/shamrock-mason-jars-2/ Materials Pint Size Regular Mouth Mason Jars Quart Size Regular Mouth Mason Jars Gold Metallic Spray Paint Green Acrylic Paint Toothpicks Medium Tip Paint Brush Instructions Spray paint jars gold and allow to dry. Use paint brush to create 3 small green dots in a clover pattern. Create a stem by dragging a toothbrush down at the bottom of the dot formation. Place varied shamrocks all over your jar to suit your taste. For Your Brain 1. Saint Patrick was the patron saint and national apostle of Ireland who is credited with bringing_____________ to Ireland. a. beer b. Christianity c. snakes d. clovers 2. Saint Patrick is most known for driving the snakes from Ireland. Snakes more likely represent: a. criminals b. snakes c. pagan religions d. leprechauns 3. The story goes that Saint Patrick converted the Druid warrior chiefs and princes by baptizing them and thousands of their subjects in a spring that still bears the same name of: a. Holy Wells b. Lochness Springs c. Emerald Waters d. Golden Hole 4. Saint Patrick's Day is a traditional day for spiritual renewal and offering prayers for missionaries worldwide. T or F 5. Today, many Catholic places of worship all around the world are named after Saint Patrick, including cathedrals in California and Dublin City. T or F Answers: 1. b. Christianity, 2. c. pagan religions, 3.a. Holy Wells, 4. True, 5. False. Saint Patrick’s Cathedrals are in New York and Dublin City. For Your Smile For Your Wallet BUY NOW! ENROLL NOW! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351 Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
  13. Hi. Here is one you can download as a sample , It will give you an idea of what to plan and how to display it. hope this helps, Thanks Pennie
  14. MultiDepartmentalForm.pdf View File File imported by an administrator Submitter Pennie Submitted 12/05/2011 Category Newsletters, Calendars, Forms, Puzzles, PrintOuts, FunFacts  
  15. Try not to over think it.. I had a couple of changes that always saved me, One was, I talked my admin into paying me to create my calendars and newsletters at home on my computer. He approved 6hrs a month on my check and that helped. Second was , when I created my activities calendar, I printed one extra for each resident, On the extra copy I would put a blank so that I could put a residents name and room number on the copy. In your case I would end up with 89 resident calendars in a folder, stapled together, that would go to each activity. Each resident in attendance would have their calendar activity highlighted to show attendance, non attendance due to vistor, participation level Red Green Yellow highlighters add a Blue and make your own color legend. Its a fast way to document who was in attendance, include notes. At the end of the month you have your attendance records and data for your careplan and progress notes. Each calendar for each resident in the folder will reflect the entire months attendance with notes, most can be documented with a quick swipe of the marker Here's a sample 3200.docx hope this helps Pennie We create a monthly calendar and newsletter available for download each month. Its a Membership, 9.95 month. http://activitycompanion.com You can use Printmaster or OnlyOffice free online to load our templates and edit to fit your facility.
  16. Are you currently a CNA? We have many students converting from the nursing department to the activity department. It is an easy transition for most as they are already familiar with the facility, residents and daily schedule. We hear many reasons for the change of position when talking with our students. Among the listed reasons: Job Burnout Want More Involvement with Residents Better Work Schedule Have a More Creative Calling This is in no way an exhaustive list. However, it sheds some light on the thought process. Perhaps you are a CNA and have been feeling the need to make some changes for similar reasons. According to our MEPAP instructor, Kathy Hughes: NCCAP has rewritten the Certification requirements over the last year to make the transition easier. A new Track 4 was introduced to allow the NCCAP applicant to apply additional work experience in place of college credits, and requiring only a high school diploma or equivalent to apply for Certification. Here are the requirements for specific to experience in the NCCAP Standards: Applicable Work Experience A. Activity Professionals Certification i. 50% of work experience must be directly working with activity programming and documentation ii. 50% can be indirectly working with activities, ie Restorative, CNA, Dietary Aide, Rehab., etc. iii. 30% of this experience can be volunteer work with individuals across the continuum of care. NOTE: NCCAP will require an official letter from the facility typed on letterhead stating the hours accumulated. ENROLL NOW! Download the Enrollment Packet for the MEPAP 1 Course for complete details. MEPAPEnrollPack.pdf BUY NOW! ENROLL NOW! Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. Activity Directors are the key to creating environments that we ourselves would be excited to live in. We envision facilities that feel like homes, not institutions. Facilities that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe providing the best education available, with the most talented teachers we can find, is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved.
  17. Hi Chiquita -- welcome to AD World
  18. Resident Thanksgiving Meal -- Staff Thanksgiving Meal -- December Resident & Family Christmas Party
  19. Excess Disability – Independence with Alzheimer's by M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP When someone has Alzheimer's with presenting dementia, their cognitive function continues to decline but they still possess abilities. In fact, skilled healthcare professionals know that continuing to do as much as they can do at their current ability level stimulates the brain and may even help to maintain skills longer. However, family members unknowingly often cause "excess disability" when in their sincere earnest to be helpful, do everything for his/her loved one to make life less challenging for the dementia diagnosed individual. Excess Disability - "Use it or lose it" When you provide opportunities for residents to do for themselves it prevents those intrinsically rooted skills from becoming rusty and ultimately no longer usable. It cannot be overstated how important purposeful activities are when discussing dementia and topics referencing motivation and engagement. Purposeful activities focused on interests work harmoniously to entice and elicit responses essential to maintain the "use it or lose it" concept. As dementia progresses, older adults are capable of less and less. Helping them find self-motivated desires to participate in everyday tasks and activities can boost mood and improve quality of life and holds the power to raise self-esteem and reduce common dementia behaviors, like agitation, repeated questions, and anger. Adapting everyday tasks with purposeful meaning for the individual diagnosed with dementia will entice and encourage mental stimulation, and provide support as needed to help older adults maintain a sense of independence and accomplishment. That is something every one of us strive to maintain for as long as it possible. Why are Dementia Activities so Important? 1) Provides Daily Structure: A structured and consistent daily routine gives needed predictability and stability when the individual is feeling disoriented and confused. 2) Prevents Decline: Continuing to do as many activities and daily tasks as independently as possible helps to preserve innate skills for a longer period of time despite disease progression. 3) Improves Mood: The individuals capabilities continue to decline with disease progression. When individuals participate in everyday tasks can boost mood and improve overall quality of life. 4) Reduce Challenging Behaviors: Challenging behaviors present with less occurrence when opportunities are made available to engage the individual in positive oriented everyday distractions. Thereby, providing a means to release energy and unexpressed emotions. Supporting Remaining Skills Look for adaptive strategies & techniques that focus on strengths/skills that the individual still possesses. Allow the individual to retain as much control possible to help foster a sense of personal dignity. Integrate "chunking" methods - (break down tasks step by step) move to the next tasks in sequence only when the previous one has been completed. Attention span may be limited so plan programs of no more than 20 to 45 minutes of time segments. Programs are most effective when they are multi-sensory & spanned over consecutive days; first day – taste applesauce, next day – taste apple pie and so on (connects related theme to facilitate memory input). Incorporate events that "elicit" a response through use of basic sensory stimulation & awareness of his/her body movements. Sensory Integration would focus on any combination of the following: Visual (eyes) Auditory (ears) Proprioceptors (awareness of body position) Vestibular (balance) Tactile (touch, feel) Olfaction (smell) Gustatory (taste) Remember: Loss of memory creates an inability for the individual to remember what they did in the past for themselves to find amusement. However, this population may still have the ability to [be amused] well into the disease process. Strategies and Techniques Meeting the individual abilities will ensure greater success. Particularly when maintaining the overall goal to support opportunities for independence and accomplishment. Set-up: Pre-plan what is needed in a manner that cues the resident to complete the task independently. Example: Clothing – Place items in order of use: underwear and bra on top, shirt and pants under them. Visual distance supervision: Remain within the line of sight to supervise and assist when needed yet distant enough to allow the individual to complete on their own. Example: Drying dishes – stand within visual view to make sure the dishes are properly towel dried - replace the towel when it has become saturated with water. Prompting: Minimize verbal instructions, simply point to the next task in the sequence to give guidance. Example: Point to the place mat. When it is placed on the table, point to the plate or ask what's next? Verbal Cues: Provide gentle verbal "cues" only as needed to prevent frustration by stating simple directions for task sequence, allow time as needed for the individual to complete one task before you offer another cue to move onto the next task. Example: Bathing – Pick up the washcloth... turn the faucet on... wet the washcloth. Physical Guidance: Use "hand over hand" or "mirror" techniques to help guide physical actions. Example: Brushing teeth: Stand behind and place your hand over the individuals hand while holding the toothbrush. Gentle provide physical guidance for brushing teeth. Note: "Excess disability" refers to the loss of an ability that comes from something other than the disease or impairment itself. In dementia care, this generally refers to the loss of abilities that go beyond the physiological changes that are caused by the dementia. Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org BUY Now Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident's individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
  20. Avoid Aging Parents Becoming A Burden By Linda LaPointe, MRA By not planning for the future we guarantee that we will leave our children with a tremendous burden. Just about the time they are preparing for their own retirement and their children's college education, adult children often are overwhelmed with decision-making for their aging parents. As a long term care administrator I heard it daily, I Dont want to be a burden to my children. But unintentionally most of us make it even harder for our children by not clearly defining our wishes or preferences. We can help them out by asserting control over our future health care, residential choices, and even how we will die. There are specific and discrete steps we can take to shape our own destiny. Many of these tasks only take a few moments of your time, some take a little research and others may require professional assistance. None of them are extremely costly or difficult. So why don't more of us do this type of planning? Seniors are concerned about losing control of their life and being a burden to their grown children but many just don't know what to do. For instance, the majority of people want to die at home, but very few do. Become familiar with your options and make your preferences known while thinking clearly, while free from pain and prior to an emergency or crisis. The loss of a parent is difficult enough for an adult child. We can save them additional grief by doing the following, clean house: get rid of all the worthless clutter and unimportant stuff prepare and organize those important papers and throw out the unimportant ones prepare advance directives and tell others what they contain and where they are located make our own funeral plans and ensure there are sufficient funds to pay for it leave our legacy through writings, photo albums, heirloom assignment and recording of family stories You can avoid becoming a burden to your children by taking control of your end of life with as much care, intent and forethought as you have lived the rest of your life. Linda LaPointe, MRA is an ElderLife Matters coach and author of several products to assist families experiencing aging including the pamphlet, Don't Be a Burden: 100 Tips. Get free articles and information at http://www.sospueblo.com/
  21. Let's Get Serious About the Nursing Home Tour Tammy Gonzales, Life Coach Before you tour your facility choices be sure you have done your homework. Go online and visit http://medicare.gov Medicare.gov. They have wonderful resources available to you for free. They are user friendly. Please see the end of this article for details. To narrow down your choice between two or three nursing homes or just considering the only available nursing home to place your family member or friend, it takes two visits. Take someone with you and if at all possible take the person who will be moving into the nursing home. Your first visit to the nursing home is what I call "Their Pitch". Set it up for the morning anytime before 11:00 AM on a Saturday and plan to be there at least an hour. Get there 15 to 20 minutes early with a magazine or a newspaper and let the receptionist know you are there. Take a seat in the lobby and wait. This is not wasted time. Open up your newspaper or magazine and eaves drop without calling attention to yourself. Let your senses lead the way. Have you been offered refreshments? Does the facility smell? Does the interaction of others sound pleasant? When you opened the front door into the nursing home did you smell urine, bowel movement, vomit or body odor? Did it to smell like flowers or antiseptic? Or like bad odors are being covered up by good odors. Broccoli, cabbage and brussel sprouts are the only offensive smells that come from the kitchen when they are being prepared. After a short while close up your magazine or paper and receptive to your visual surroundings. If there is someone else sitting there try to start a conversation about the nursing home and find out what they think. Listen to the tone of their voice, watch facial expression and body language. By now the admissions coordinator or someone is going to invite you into their office or take you for a tour and give you "The. When they take you into the office they are going to ask you questions. Names, name of potential resident, age, diagnosis, who their doctor is, where are they now, do they have Medicare, insurance, are you the health care power of attorney, do they have a living will, have you applied for assistance, how soon do you plan to place them here, etc. They are going to try to emotional connect with you as well. They are looking for potential problems too. Pleasantly answer their questions. If you have a few questions ask and be sure to ask if you can have a copy of an information packet or pre-admission packet. So on to the tour. The tour is about showing you the best of what they have to offer. They will introduce you to everyone and show you the facility. Let "Their Pitch" happen and go along with it. Don't ask too many questions now because you will distract yourself from observations that you need in order to make a sound choice. During the tour you will be introduced to the different department managers and shown their offices. You won't be expected to remember names and it is more important how they respond and take an interest in you. Also, during this tour pay attention to the interaction between staff and residents in every area you are toured through. This is important. Observe the residents. Are their clothes clean and in good repair? Are they wearing footwear? Do the men look clean and shaved? Does their hair look cared for or is it a mess? Do the women have appropriate hairstyles (I have seen them put pigtails on top of balding 90 year olds)? Do they still have bibs on from their last meal? Does any one look cold and not have a sweater? Do you see a number of residents that are wet or smell of urine or BM? Do the hands look clean especially under the nails? Do the wheel chairs look clean and cared for with no sharp edges or tatters? Do the residents in wheel chairs look comfortable? Are residents in wheel chairs being pushed too fast or backwards? Are residents that are being walked rushed or are they allowed to walk at their own pace? Is a resident yelling out the whole time you are there? The flooring should be clean and free from any debris. The walls should be clean. The lighting should be good. Carpets free from spots. Decorative items should look well kept. Drapery should be open to allow the natural sunlight in. You will be taken to the nurse's station. The nurses should be pleasant and responsive to the residents and family members. Listen to their tone and responsiveness in their voice. Watch their body language as they acknowledge you or others at the nursing station. Is this representative of how you would like your loved one to be responded to? One area you will be taken to, will be the Rehabilitation area where physical, occupational and speech therapies are provided. How are the therapists interacting with the residents? Are there residents in the area alone? Is privacy being respected? Is it busy with activity or is no one there? Listen to find out if they have at least a full-time physical therapist and occupational therapist, it is important to know, as your loved one may require these services from time to time. Do they mention at least a part time speech-language pathologist? It is always good to have one available to screen your loved one if they ever begin to have speech problems or eating problems like swallowing. Once at the Activities Department, observe what is going on each time you pass by. Make it a point to stop for a few minutes and observe residents and don't be surprised if not every resident in the activities room, is not doing something. Are at least 25% of the residents doing something like reading, watching TV, or doing the activity that is going on at the time? Ask to see or have a copy of the activities calendar. Observe interactions. The dining areas are a very important area to make observations. Check to see if they have more that one dining room or area? If the nursing home that you are at has 120 beds and is not specific to only Alzheimers/dementia residents, then there is a mix of residents functioning at different levels. There are usually three functional levels of dining: residents that can dine independently, residents that require cueing, and residents that need to be fed. Observe for the different types of dinning rooms or areas. If residents are dining observe for a few moments. Are they socializing, smiling, having a difficult time with the food? This is important because as your loved ones functional ability may decline and they may need cueing or to be fed from time to time. What is the facilities policy about residents dining in their room? The tour guide (admissions coordinator) will show you a few resident rooms. Most of the time they will show you the rooms of clean, fairly independent, and continent residents with good family support, a well decorated room, not the room they would be admitting your loved one into. Facilities are limited to the number of private rooms they have. Most of the rooms are semi private with a private bathroom for the two sharing the room or a bathroom that is shared with the adjoining room. Look in the bathroom if you can. There is much to consider. During the tour they will hopefully show you outdoor areas for the residents. Is it shaded from the sun? Is it partially protected from the weather like rain, snow, and wind? Do they have an area outdoors for residents who smoke? Are there seating areas? Is it visually appealing? This is usually what happens during "Their Pitch". They ask you for information and you ask questions and make observations. Just like when you are with a salesman they want you to get emotionally connected with their facility. At the closing be sure to thank them for their time and let them know that you will be in touch with them soon. Before your second visit, try and read the information related specifically to the nursing home and what their expectations are of you and the resident from the information packet or a pre-admission packet you received. Then make a list of questions for the next visit. If you can't think of any questions, Medicare's publication Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home has questions on several pages that you can tear out and take along with you to what I call the YOUR Q&A VISIT. Try to make YOUR Q&A VISIT unexpected on a weekday. Ask to speak to the admissions coordinator or some one who can answer some questions that came up. I will just tell you now, that if they respond timely to you at this visit that's how you will be responded to if your family member was in the nursing home. This is your opportunity to get your questions answered and to get any additional information that will help you make the best choice. If you live in a small town this nursing home may be your only choice and you will learn to be a good advocate. However, if you live in a large town or metropolitan area you will have a choice of several nursing homes, pick the one that suits your loved ones needs and not your convenience. I wish you the best of luck on your search. Thank you. Here are the valuable Resource Links that I promised. Just click on the title. http://www.medicare.gov/NHCompare/Include/DataSection/Questions/SearchCriteria.asp "Home Health Compare“ Will provide you data about home health agencies most recent survey and compare it to others you select for free. http://www.medicare.gov/HHCompare/Home.asp "Long-Term Care Counselor" Will help you make a determination of the type care and where the care can best be provided for you or for some that needs help or supervision. http://www.medicare.gov/LongTermCare/Static/LTCCounselor.asp Publications - Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home, Medicare and You 2020, Medicare Coverage & Skilled Nursing Facility Care http://www.medicare.gov/Publications/Search/SearchCriteria.asp Tammy Gonzales, Life Coach specializing in family and professional caregivers, the elderly, patients, survivors, those facing crisis and the end of life. Copyright © 2020 RevitaLife Coaching & Consulting, LLC Her current project, Caregiver& Aging Awareness Campaign is to provide all caregivers and the aging with useful information and direct them to the resources of free available information to complete their life planning. http://www.revitalifecoaching.com tammy@revitalifecoaching.com
  22. Bingo Is Not Just A Game! By Jerry Lynn Daniels, ADC/ALF/MC/AD/EDU, CDP ** Article describing Bingo as an assessment tool. Food for Thought ** Bingo is very popular in geriatric recreational programming. It is the most requested activity in most seniors facilities or communities. Activity Professionals for years have heard the dreaded "all you do is play bingo all day" from co-workers, friends and family alike. Bingo is not all they do but it is a very important part of their jobs. Although it is at times dreaded by professional caregivers, it should remain a part of recreational programming because of it obvious entertainment value. And of course we know if it were removed it could cause a revolt. There is a not-so-obvious reason as well. Therapists, nurses, social workers, friends, families as well as activities professionals should learn to use bingo as an assessment tool. The best part is that there are no fancy, expensive assessment packages to purchase. You use an activity which is already taking place. --------------------------------------------- Bingo can be used to assess a persons level of function in certain areas such as these: Hearing. It will become obvious if someone is constantly asking that the numbers be recalled. or if a person who normally sits at the back of the room all of a sudden asks to sit closer to the caller. Visual cards may be required. Sight. You may observe a person straining their neck or eyes. They may be leaning in closer to the card or may have many called numbers still uncovered. Speech. A person must be able to yell "bingo" but must also be able to call out there numbers once they have won the game. Cognition. A person may begin to have trouble finding the numbers once they have been called or may not be able to follow through with covering the number once called. Fine Motor Skills. Fine motor skills must be used to manipulate the cards whether slide cards or traditional cards and chips are being used. They may repeatedly knock all their chips from their card or be unable to slide the covers into place. Social Appropriateness. The persons ability to interact appropriately in a social setting is also assessed. ------------------------------------------- When using bingo as an assessment tool, one session will tell you a lot about the person. However, observing several games over a course of time is best. If you are a professional in one of the senior settings, learn to assess your clients using bingo. If you are a family member who is noticing some changes in your loved one, get them involved in games such as these. Not only will they help with socialization and entertainment but they may also help you to understand different aspects of your loved one's functional level. There are many websites where you can create your own bingo cards. Just search "free bingo cards" or go to either of these sites http://www.print-bingo.com or http://www.dltk-cards.com There are senior centers throughout Jacksonville which offer full activities calendars including bingo. For a listing of the City of Jacksonville Community Senior Centers go to http://www.coj.net/Departments/Recreation+and+Community+Services/Adult+Services/Community+and+Senior+Centers/default.htm If you have any comments or questions regarding this article or a suggestion for an upcoming article please contact me at jerrylynndaniels@yahoo.com. Continue reading on Examiner.com: Bingo is not just a game - Jacksonville elder care | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/elder-care-in-jacksonville/geriatric-recreational-programming-bingo-not-just-a-game#ixzz1DQWfAjX9
  23. REFLECTING RESIDENTS' SPIRITUAL NEEDS IN CARE PLANS --- By Sue Schoenbeck, R.N., Michael Rock, Jill Cullen, Carol Gabor Authors: Sue Schoenbeck, R.N., is director of resident care; Michael Rock is administrator and chief executive officer; Jill Cullen is plan of care coordinator; and Carol Gabor is a social worker at Ingleside Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Mount Horeb, Wis. --- Far less is known about the human spirit than is known about the body and the mind. But issues of the spirit are important when caring for the elderly in long term care environments, as well as preparing residents, families, and staff for the death of a resident. Therefore, it is judicious for the caregiving team to gather information about spiritual as well as physiological, mental, and psychosocial needs. Ingleside Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Mount Horeb, Wis., has created a spiritual assessment tool congruent with the minimum data set (MDS 2.0) to help determine each resident's spiritual needs, which then can be addressed in the care plan. to create your Spiritual Care Assessment... Ingleside's spiritual care program is rooted in a theory of logotherapy developed by Viktor Frankl, a Viennese psychiatrist who survived several World War II concentration camps. He proposed that people can find meaning in life events, including suffering, and can transcend what fate bestows. Frankl believed that people search for meaning in life up to and often through the death event. Asking questions pertinent to spiritual needs makes residents feel welcome to share their spiritual side. How a person chooses to live life is reflective of the spirit that lies within. By using an assessment tool to gather data, caregivers can build a care plan upon the experiences the resident values most and wishes to retain. The Assessment Tool The first part of Ingleside's spiritual care assessment tool (see box below) gleans information from the resident pertaining to concepts of a god or deity, religious practices, and helping others. Questions include: Do you usually attend church, temple, or synagogue? Do you find strength in your religious faith? Have you participated in or would you be interested in a Bible study group? Do you enjoy helping others? In what ways have you helped others? Ingleside Spiritual Assessment Part I: Activities Name: _______________ Medical Record # ____________ Date___________ Concept of God Is religion or a god important to you? Is prayer helpful? Does a god play a role in your life? Customary Routine: Involvement Pattern Do you find strength in your religious faith? Do you usually attend church, temple, synagogue, etc.? Are there any religious practices that are important to you? Religious Practices Has being sick made any difference in your religious practices or prayer? What religious books or songs are helpful to you? Have you participated in/would you be interested in a bible study group? Helping Others Do you enjoy helping others? In what ways have you helped others? Recommendations for care plan: __________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Assessor's Name _____________________ Title _______________ Source: Ingleside Inc. Part II of the spiritual assessment tool (see box below) engages the resident in conversation about sources of help and strength, relation between spiritual self and health, and impending death. Questions in this section include: What are your personal goals? Do you want to participate in or assist with religious services at the facility? Are there roles you had in your life before that now are closed off to you? What has given your life meaning in the past? What gives your life meaning now? Ingleside Spiritual Assessment Part II: Social Services Name ______________ Medical Record # ________ Date _______ Sources Of Hope And Strength Who is the most important person to you?______________________ Are there roles you had in your life before that are now closed off to you? If so, how do you feel about this? What has given your life meaning? What gives your life meaning now? In what ways do others help you? What helps you most when you feel afraid or need special help? What is your source of strength or hope? Goals What are your personal goals? Do you want to participate in and/or assist with religious services at Ingleside? Relation Between Spiritual And Health What do you think is going to happen to you? Has being sick made any difference in your feelings or beliefs about God or religion? Is there anything particularly frightening or meaningful to you now? Impending Death Do you want a bedside service? __ No __ Yes Clergy: Your own? ______ Parish _______ Phone _______ Other? _______ Parish _______ Phone_______ Do you want it in your room or chapel? _______________ Do you wish to be present or would you prefer it be held without your presence? Are there any special words, prayers, songs, or thoughts you would like expressed at the service? Recommendations for care plan: ___________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Assessor's Name _____________________ Title _______________ Source: Ingleside Inc. Once the caregiver has completed the resident interview, information from the spiritual assessment tool is incorporated into the individual's care plan. For example, when a resident reports prayer as a daily part of his or her past life, staff can include "provide private times for prayer" in the care plan. A resident with Alzheimer's disease for whom evening prayer had been a ritual can be guided by staff each evening in this routine. Staff can assist family members to record familiar prayers for playing to their loved ones. Furthermore, resident prayer and hymn requests can be incorporated into a weekly nondenominational service. If the assessment shows the resident is experiencing spiritual distress, care plan approaches may include pastoral counseling, psychotherapy intervention, and medication regimen evaluation. But caregivers should not assume that residents' feelings will remain static. Entering a nursing facility does not mean a person stops growing and changing. Residents often reevaluate and change what they value. Therefore, spiritual needs must be regularly monitored and changes to the care plan made accordingly to guide staff in providing the support the resident needs. Bedside Closure Service It is understandable that residents and families have heightened spiritual needs as death approaches. But facility management should remember that staff, too, will have intensified needs because of their close interactions with residents. Therefore, Ingleside holds a bedside closure service to comfort those left behind. Part II of the assessment tool provides information about whether or not a resident and family want a service and what they would like incorporated into the service. The service is designed not only to honor the resident in the manner requested, but to give staff the opportunity to say good-bye and to share with family, friends, and the departed some of the good times experienced together. For example, at an Ingleside bedside closure service for a man who communicated only by repeating two syllables, certified nurse assistants (CNAs) told family members how they had learned what the resident wanted by his intonation of the two syllables. Another CNA thanked the family for the opportunity to care for a man who had taught her she wanted to make a career of helping people with speech impairments. A housekeeper commented he would miss joking around and seeing the resident's broad smile. Ingleside staff has assembled a bedside closure service guide that includes some of the songs and prayers most frequently requested by the facility's population. This guide is printed in large type for ease in reading. A staff-written prayer book is given to each new resident and staff member to help people find words with which to pray together. Program Benefits In 1995, Ingleside conducted an exploratory descriptive study of the value of its spiritual care program for residents, families, and staff. Results indicated that the program led to increased knowledge of and response to residents' spiritual needs. Impending deaths were more openly discussed, leading staff to communicate with residents about their last wishes. The quality of life near death was enhanced as individual wishes were honored. Families also benefited. Positive written responses have been received from the families of residents for whom a bedside closure service was held. A daughter wrote on behalf of her family, "We felt the service for Mother was helpful and thoughtful. We felt she was liked and respected although we know she was a trying woman." Giving spiritual care offers staff the opportunity to get to know the spiritual side of the residents and, with residents and families, explore the meaning of life.
  24. Best Laid Plans by M. Celeste Chase, AC-BC, ACC, CDP, CMDCP A best-laid plan refers to when things gone awry or simply stated, something that has not turned out as well as one initially had hoped for. The expression the best-laid plan carries the implication that one should not expect everything to always turn out as planned. Easier said than done… right? The idea that no matter how much thought or pre-planning gets devoted towards a certain task or endeavor and it may still turn out unsuccessful is disheartening to say the least. That said, when things do not go as expected, it is completely normal to feel as though someone has just taken a bit of a bite out of your self-confidence. Such is the scenario when the appropriate time has been dedicated to review resident assessments, history, clinical status and pursuits of interest to develop the perfect mix of calendar events for your resident. Surprisingly and low and behold – your resident does not want to participate in the event. In fact, your resident very unapologetically lets you know that your event was a total flop. Adding salt to the wound, that is the same resident initially expressed an interest and requested the event to begin with! Yikes yet again! It Happens Without a doubt, many of us if not all of us in this field have been there. Sincerely and earnestly planning what we believe to be on target “person centered” pursuits of interest. Only to have the very same residents who had asked for the program to flat out reject it. So what happens when those “best laid plans” go off the rails and turn out all wrong! When your plans hit the fan, you can either fuss about it and go negative or choose to take the opportunity to cultivate an optimistic viewpoint. How it that done anyways? It’s a question of rolling with the punches – and acquiring the ability to remain flexible – not take the rejection personally – and lastly, learning from the experience. “Adversity can - make you stronger!” Why? Humans have the capacity and the determination to avoid the same outcome previously experienced. Resiliency is a gift and one that we all posses - it’s time to pull up those boot straps ladies and gents and look at the process to find out why that well planned event was not well received by your resident. Resident Planning Committee Make it your mission to involve the residents in planning the calendar every time a new one needs to be created. The consistent and routine resident participation in planning events will lead to a number of great benefits for both you the professional and the residents you serve. Start the process by searching for two residents that seem excited about contributing ideas for calendar events. These two residents will become your “volunteer ambassadors”. These “ambassadors” should be good communicators, warm and friendly residents willing to personally visit fellow residents to talk about all the ways he/she can contribute to facility programming and thereby adding their valued ideas. This “buddy resident” system is a successful approach for both new and existing residents. New Residents Consider that newbie residents may be shy and undecided about starting interactions with the large existing (perhaps scary) group of residents. When the new resident is approached by two friendly, outgoing and happy residents; he/she may find it less intimidating and more likely open to be part of the Resident Planning Committee. Existing Residents “Buddy resident” system makes for great ambassadors to help current residents as well. The pair can help to revitalize interest and help fellow residents to feel valued once again. It just takes a couple of energetic residents to give a gentle nudge now and then. Committee Structure and Process If you have more than one resident interested in chairing the committee, ask residents to assume the resident chair position on a rotation bases. This gives everyone that desires to do so a turn and gives a well deserved break to those that have previously served as chair. Write the resident ideas for events on a white board – keep them up on the white board till the next meeting. Why? 1) This allows you to erase events after they have been put on the calendar. Thus, you can keep adding and erasing as you are able to schedule them in any given month. Additionally, this is a great visual for the resident to see his/her ideas actively go from the white board to the calendar and gives the resident a sense of achievement. 2) Visually displays what the Resident Planning Committee has created for all to see. This is particularly useful for memory impaired residents as they can become agitated or upset when they do not like or recognize a program idea even though they initially suggested it. NOTE: Memory issues are the commonly seen contributor relating to event rejection and refusal because the resident does not recognize what they asked for in the previous moments. 3) Residents can be fearful that their ideas may not be well liked by others. Create an “anonymous “idea box” to keep the identities of those that would not otherwise give up what they secretly want you to add to facility programming. Memory impaired residents may perhaps make up the majority of the group you serve. When a program event is rejected by this group, whether it was initially the residents’ idea or not, do not take it personally. Remind yourself that his/her behavior is a product of related memory issues. The most effective response for you as a professional is to quickly “redirect” your resident to something else to prevent further emotional or behavioral escalation. Know Your Audience Knowing who your audience means that you can adapt the content of your presentation to address the main concerns of your audience. Professionals leading a group of seniors regardless of the group size must know and understand why the group wants to be present, what motivates the group, and whether you are matching your information to their level of understanding and interests. It’s an ongoing day to day learning experience for the Activity Professional and we all know that you have the knowledge and the skills – Remember that you got this! The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry. No matter how carefully a project is planned, something may still go wrong with it. The saying is adapted from a line in “To a Mouse,” by Robert Burns: “The best laid schemes o' mice an' men / Gang aft a-gley.” Have a topic request or question for Celeste? Send them over to celestechase@activitydirector.org BUY Now Our MEPAP 1&2 Courses 2 Course Formats www.ActivityDirector.org - 1.888.238.0444 Structured Class (16 Weeks) - Begins the First Tuesday of each Month Self Paced Class (13 Weeks-1 Year) - Enroll and Begin Anytime Activity Directors Network was founded in 1996 on the idea that we could help create elderly care that dramatically improved the lives of those we all serve. We envision facilities that feel like homes and that celebrate our resident’s individuality and allows them to live with dignity, purpose and joy. We believe the exchange of education and wisdom between the most talented teachers and passionate students is the way to make an impact. Each and every single one of you are the revolution that is changing everything. Thanks for being a part of The Network. Copyright © 2019 Activity Directors Network, LLC All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: 2010 US HWY 190 W Ste 120 Livingston, Texas 77351
 
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