Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest lyn

aphasic residents

Recommended Posts

Guest lyn

hi

some of my residents sit out in activity programs daily but remain passive all the time. there is no response whatsoever to stimulation.

Some of them are aphasic. I feel terrible not being able to provide some activity that can help resident to respond.

Can some one Please help me?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Guest lyn

Hi

I am waiting patiently for some one to reply. Can I get some ideas of programs for aphasic residents? I know that hand rubs, reading to residents, music,

beautiful nails. Please add some interesting ones to my list.

Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
 
Guest stac

lyn,

 

no response at all ? eye contact, movement, facial expressions, gestures

look at their assessments and see what they did for a living or past interest and see if you can adapt something to get a response.

Pictures, different textures,scents, sensory boxes, pets

Hope this helps ya.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

The majority of our residents that are aphasic with little to no response in structured activities participate in our sensory stimulation program. For larger group activities we play picture videos, aroma therapy, touch therapy or even do gentle excersises with them ( range of motion type)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Hi lyn,

 

I don't know if you are local to me but I get a lot of response to my music program with people who don't respond to activities in general; you can email me mail@tracypace.com for some suggestions on 'passive activities'.

 

We make a lot of assumptions when people's feedback isn't typical but there are often small signs I've missed that a person benefits from contact and stimulation even when they don't appear responsive.

 

Even if you got no response at all I'd say still make the person comfortable and included, and show affection etc. because they know on some level that they are being cared for & cherished.

 

~Tracy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I intern at an Adult Daycare facility and we have some members that have had a stroke and have lost their ability to speak or have become paralyzed and are forced to be in a wheel chair in addition to not speaking. One activity that seems to always stimulate these members in some way (a wave of a hand, bobbing their head, tapping their foot, etc.) is listening to music...either on the radio, or playing cds, or live musicians who come to perform at the facility. Hope this helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I had a lady that never spoke and seemed very unresponsive for about 6 months after taking the job. One day I went out for lunch to a resale shop and purchased some cute dolls. Upon returning I placed one of the dolls in her lap. She raised her head, looked at me and said, "oh how precious!" She's been talking daily since that encounter. Her family informed me she used to be a school teacher. So I began to bring in more activities such as maps, large puzzles, jumbo cards, etc.., large print bible stories....guess what? She's yet talking!

 

Keep the faith, learn about their past and continue to use one on one approach! I expect great things from my residents...and somehow it just happens......

 

Bennie,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
hi

some of my residents sit out in activity programs daily but remain passive all the time. there is no response whatsoever to stimulation.

Some of them are aphasic. I feel terrible not being able to provide some activity that can help resident to respond.

Can some one Please help me?

 

When dealing with aphasic patients it is important to review their psychosocial history as well as talk to family members to get a general idea of who the patient is an individual. Then you will be better able to provide them with things that are more probable to initiate a response. Remember never to assume that a patient is not aware of their external surroundings based on their cognitive decline. One more point to consider is that the hearing is said to be the last sensory function to die.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
  • Create New...