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vickie81092

New to Dementia and Alzheimer Clients

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Hello all,

I work for a LTC Facility and we recently had two Alzheimer clients move in. I am not sure how to handle their activity needs. They are both two completly different individuals one is easily redirected and the other is always crying and worried. The calm one loves babies, folding, talking and walking she is very easy to handle. On the other hand we have one that cant sit still for very long still understands somethings and gets very upset very easy. Can anyone tell me how to handle someone in this condition. There is really no good time for this poor person. I want to help her but whenever you try to engage her in anything she gets upset because her family is not there. She does not remember what you tell her, we have tried writting it down and she looses the paper. What can I do. :rolleyes:

 

 

Vickie

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We have 11 folks in our memory care unit. And this includes my own mom. They vary in what stage they are in. I do know that it takes about 3 weeks for them to become adjusted. And it requires a lot of patience. The best thing is to keep them busy and engaged. When things get quiet, that's when the trouble starts! We are fortunate in the fact that we have a wonderful psychiatrist who sees our residents in the building. She has helped them with meds and has given the familiies and us some ideas too. Good luck and let me know what happens...

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Hi Vickie,

I run across that often. I have a secured unit with 42 residents with Alzheimer's or other Dementia related diseases. Sometimes a new resident does have difficulty adjusting to all the new faces and surroundings. I have found time is your only friend. My experience is just showing them love and reinforcing the fact that they are safe. Once you've gained their trust, they will be your new best friend. This usually doesn't happen overnight, however. Each resident adjusts differently and on their schedule not ours. Bonding with their family members is a plus. When the resident observes you with their loved one and it's a happy gathering, they are going to sense that, and believe me, that is key. Keeping your resident busy is also important. The busier he/she is, the more important they feel. My only suggestion for your sweet resident is love. You are not in the Activity field by chance. You are there because you care and your heart has led you there...your residents will feel it. Hang in there. Let me know if I can be of any further assistance. I hope this helps. Good luck.

 

~Tammy

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Hi Vickie,

 

I work on the Alzheimer’s/Dementia Unit in my building; Transitioning is probably the hardest thing for a person with Alzheimer’s to do. When they are put into a unfamiliar place and do not know where they are or the people around them they become very frightened. Having patience with your little lady and gaining her trust will take time be patient with her let her feel like she has some control over herself if possible let her make some decisions like choosing what she wants to wear and if she cant make choices very well then give her two outfits and let her choose the one she wants,

be careful with the surroundings such as too much noise, the temperature, too hot or too cold, is she in pain, could she be hungry or thirsty? Does she need to toilet? She may not be able to tell you what she wants or needs that will make her frustrated and angry. See if you can talk with her family; make a journal about her life, where she grew up, farm life or city. Community involvement, church groups, her father and mother, sisters and brothers, children ect. anything that would bring back good memories of her past since that is where she probably is in her stage of Alzheimer’s, Having a photo album of pictures with names would probably be helpful, does she like manicures, hand massages, beauty shop, music? Watch her through the day see if certain times or things that are occurring are triggering her behaviors? Oh and the loosing the paper situation, I had a resident who came to the desk probably 40-50 times a day when she first came to us, we gave her a paper too and she would carry it to her room and put it away and then come back and ask us the same question so we took one of the notes and taped it to the desk and redirected her to the note when she approached us about her car keys and her checkbook we placed the note on the desk where she could see it taped it down and redirected her to it when she approached the desk. After a few weeks she was making fewer trips. She still sometimes will come up and tell us her checkbook and car keys are gone and we remind her that her son has them and that helped calm her. I hope some of this has been helpful to you just have patience and God Bless

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Hi Vickie,

 

I work with Alzheimer's/Dementia Patients as well. and one of the things I agree on is the time you spend with them is a plus. Keeping them active and seeing your face on a regular bases will gain that trust, with time your face will be familiar. one of the things I do is I Play a card game with them They seem to like "Black jack" it took them a whole month to learn the game but now thats all they want to to. Its an easy card game and the really enjoy it. Of course there is going to be those that cant add so you will have to hint the on whether or not to take a hit. Trust me Patience and care works great together.

Edited by riveratime

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