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vickie81092

How to get help with transports to and from activities

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Can anyone please tell me how they get their nursing team to help with activities. Today I was approached by one of our nursing staff saying that we needed to stop getting residents up after they laid them down. I told them that they know when our activities start and the residents want to go. I also told them that it is a federal guideline that they be involved in activities. They must help get residents to and from activities. They think that Activities is a luxury and not a need. I have tried telling them that if they get their residents to activities they will be able to do other things other than answer those residents call lights and attend to there other daily duties. They do not seem to care and refuse to help. When I approach my ED about this issue she just says "The Aids are busy and don't have time".

 

Can anyone give me some ideas on what to do?

 

 

Vickie

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well first dont give up! we also struggle at our facility to get help as well. but you just have to keep telling them that we are a team here. we are all a team for the residents. and we all need to work as a team to do what is in their best interest. they have the right to go to activities by law regardless of there health what their aide says they still have the right to decide what they want to do and when. most cnas are stubborn. but sometimes when reminded that we are all a team and by helping take residents to activities and allowing them to go to activites will inturn let the cna get ahead on there list of residents and possibly get a break. i know its difficult but never give up!

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I worked around this by having activities immediately before and after lunch - like exercise at 11am and bingo at 1pm. It's not the best solution, because it crams everything together instead of spreading out the fun stuff, but it does work if you've exhausted all other avenues. Your ED sounds pretty stubborn - and it is totally true that activities are a very necessary part of their well being. They need to respect that, but I can also empathize with overworked CNAs.

 

So, for example, on Tuesdays, I do Aromatherapy Hand Massages and Nail Painting at 9am. There is usually a small group already up and in the living room (by the way, we are a person centered care facility, so they get up at 5am if they want, or 2pm, or not at all. That makes it even more challenging!) I can do the activity as a sort of group thing with them, then move on to room to room and do it 1:1 with the people that haven't gotten up, but are awake. At 11am, I have walking club that my ambulatory residents join in on. (there is nothing in between because we have care plans every Tuesday at 10am.)

 

Then they have lunch at 12pm. The CNA's usually park everybody in the living room after that, where I can come "harvest" people from for Bingo at 2pm. I also do a quick activity some afternoons right before I leave, right before they are all gathering for dinner at 5:15. I'll do something at 4:30 in the living room, like some balloon volleyball exercise or a travel DVD to perk them up.

 

Also, you have to try to continue to communicate with your CNA's. It's hard, and I'm sure they try to lay the same guilt trip on you that I've had laid on me, "You get to play all day, but we're working our butts off and you're asking US for more?" The simple answer is YES. I'm sorry, but yes.

 

How I finally got around the problem was that I made friends with the CNA's. I tried to help them out whenever possible with the things that I could help out with. I do the makeup for the ladies in the morning, which takes the pressure off of them to try to make these ladies fabulous (they have very exacting standards, some of them!) I've been known to answer call lights when I'm at the nurse's station doing charting. (Of course, if it's anything I can't do, I'll restart the light so someone else will answer it.) Often times it's just that someone wants their water refilled, or they're struggling with a button. I make sure that the CNA's notice I've done those things, without being overly obnoxious about it. Like, I'll make a joke, "Oh, silly Mr. So and so, when I answered his call light, he told me I was as beautiful as ever! The flatterer!" That way, I can tell them that I helped them out without acting like I'm demanding recognition for it.

 

Also, if you do any baking activities, make sure to make as much as is feasible, and push them on the staff. Also, if you have a tea party or other food party, give all your leftovers to the CNA's. Your popularity will go up A LOT if you feed them. It will cost you a little more, but it is worth it to have allies.

 

Every day is not perfect, and I still struggle with CNA's with attitude, but it is MUCH better than when I started here.

 

I forgot one more thing; if none of that works, you can also consider directly bribing them. I heard of an AD who gave tokens to the CNAs, one for each resident they brought to an activity. 5 residents, 5 tokens. She had a list in the nurse's station of items they could buy with the tokens, like a bottle of coke for 5 tokens, etc. It was hard on her budget, but attendance went up dramatically. (Of course, then you'll have the separate problem of them bringing in people who aren't right for the activity - practically comatose people in geri chairs to Crossword Puzzles, or confused, loudly talkative people to Bingo.)

 

Good luck!

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Can anyone please tell me how they get their nursing team to help with activities. Today I was approached by one of our nursing staff saying that we needed to stop getting residents up after they laid them down. I told them that they know when our activities start and the residents want to go. I also told them that it is a federal guideline that they be involved in activities. They must help get residents to and from activities. They think that Activities is a luxury and not a need. I have tried telling them that if they get their residents to activities they will be able to do other things other than answer those residents call lights and attend to there other daily duties. They do not seem to care and refuse to help. When I approach my ED about this issue she just says "The Aids are busy and don't have time".

 

Can anyone give me some ideas on what to do?

 

 

Vickie

 

To Everyone,

 

Thank you for the support I have received on my other site. I have been so busy and wish great patience and joy to all us who work with seniors.

 

I see a chance to improve the communication gap that is going on between the activiy dept and the nursing dept. In my eyes, I believe, "IF it is not written down, it never happened", what does the chart say?

 

Maybe this is a chance for the activities dept to include some "therapy" type activities to show the nursing dept that we are willing to assist our residents in maintaining their strength of both mind AND spirit.

 

An example of a beneficial activity to both depts could be- I.E., following weight bearing excercises that are posted on our residents rooms (from the therapist) that take time, our time, to assist the residents in completing those prescribed exercises.

 

Please have the patience with both depts., it is not either partys' fault that we are overworked and underpaid and this doesn't have anything to do with a "Depression"

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I understand this problem to the fullest extent. I have been working at my facility for four years now and our DON continues to not support our programs and often will tell me what a great job I do at entertaining. Ha! Here all along I thought our programs are enhancing our residents quality of life and meeting their psycho-social, spirtitual, emotional needs and many more. Iguess I've gone a little crazy!

 

What I have found very helpful to get our CNA's on board, is being part of our facilities orientation presentation. Obviously, I can't change the hard core mindsets so I figure why not inform the new and upcoming nursing staff on the importance of every resident having an activity program. I have a 30min. presentation w/the new orientees and inform them how important they are to our dept. and how we can help them out. I bring items that any staff member can get from a cubbard for the residents who are low functioning. Many 1:1 items.

 

As we all know, when someone is starting a new job they are more eager to work hard at doing the "right thing". My passion for our dept. and our residents is displayed during my presentation and I now often get feedback from new staff that they are impressed w/our programs and can tell I really care. I believe that some of my "energy" rubs off and honestly I've been getting more help and received w/a more positive attitude.

 

Let me tell ya, our facility is far from wonderful. Just keep a positive attitude, never let anyone feel/read into your frustration, and changes do occur. For us, it changes very slowly!

 

Best Wishes

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Can anyone please tell me how they get their nursing team to help with activities. Today I was approached by one of our nursing staff saying that we needed to stop getting residents up after they laid them down. I told them that they know when our activities start and the residents want to go. I also told them that it is a federal guideline that they be involved in activities. They must help get residents to and from activities. They think that Activities is a luxury and not a need. I have tried telling them that if they get their residents to activities they will be able to do other things other than answer those residents call lights and attend to there other daily duties. They do not seem to care and refuse to help. When I approach my ED about this issue she just says "The Aids are busy and don't have time".

 

Can anyone give me some ideas on what to do?

 

 

Vickie

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I offer an exchange to them. If they have residents to activities I loan them a volunteer to fill ice pitchers, change out wash towels, do small task or filing etc. I also try to always have "leftovers" when we do food or craft projects. I also have several residents who love to give shoulder massages...so all of these things go a long way to fostering good will and team work. I also have managed to get some other department heads to lead group activities and then they in turn can put the heat on their own departments to help with gathering residents.

 

Hope this helps

 

Thom

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