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Resident Transitioning

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I work at a CCRC and we working on the best practices for moving residents from one level of care to another (particularly assisted living to long-term care). Many residents are resistant (of course they don't like change) but will benefit more from our LTC activity program than our assisted living program (usually due to physical/cognitive decline). Does anyone have any experience/and or suggestions on how best to do this? I am reminded that as activity directors we cannot force a resident to attend an activity but we can try to make the transition appear more appealing.

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I work at a CCRC and we working on the best practices for moving residents from one level of care to another (particularly assisted living to long-term care). Many residents are resistant (of course they don't like change) but will benefit more from our LTC activity program than our assisted living program (usually due to physical/cognitive decline). Does anyone have any experience/and or suggestions on how best to do this? I am reminded that as activity directors we cannot force a resident to attend an activity but we can try to make the transition appear more appealing.

 

 

One-way that may I suggest is by slowly transitioning the resident. Bring the resident to LTC for a little bit of a time a day. Always try to pair the resident with an old familiar friend in the LTC. This way the friend can bond with them and the resident can see that it is not that bad. That would be the only advice I can give.

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Hello,

We run into this in my building particularly because when we have a level of care change it’s because one of our Assisted Living residents is transitioning to our secured Memory Care Unit. I have found that by spending time with our AL residents, when it comes time to make the move to MC they already know me. The same applies to my Activity Assistants. They are scheduled in both areas of the building so they, too, can form a relationship with all the residents. It just makes the move smoother. The resident feels they already have a safe and familiar face in their new environment. It’s beneficial to the family members as well. Everyone wins. Another biggie is the folks on my Memory Unit attend every function in the building with the AL/IL residents. They mix and mingle with the all of the residents. That’s so helpful because if and when an AL resident needs MC, they will see that life really doesn’t change that much. They are just living on a different floor. Sometimes we have the resident who is in need of the change spend time on MC participating in Activities or just visiting. Often we will have that resident dine with a few of our residents in the Main Dining Room for a meal. Having a familiar face in new surroundings is so important. I hope this helps you. Good luck.

 

~Tammy

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I work at a CCRC and we working on the best practices for moving residents from one level of care to another (particularly assisted living to long-term care). Many residents are resistant (of course they don't like change) but will benefit more from our LTC activity program than our assisted living program (usually due to physical/cognitive decline). Does anyone have any experience/and or suggestions on how best to do this? I am reminded that as activity directors we cannot force a resident to attend an activity but we can try to make the transition appear more appealing.

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Try bringing your resident to where he will be moving too a week or two in advance,. allow him to participate in the groups, mealtimes, let hiim get accustomed to what will be his new surroundings and friends. Ask him if there is something he enjoys and maybe would like to show the other residents, maybe he would like to assist in one of the group activity he enjoys. Being patient and understanding with him and listening to his concerns. assure him that he will still be able to make some of his own decisions. Give him time to become comfortable with his new surroundings and be there for his fearful times.

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Depending on their cognitive level, a good explanation is that "these are the new apartments that opened." I'm using that excuse with one of our residents who has really made the full change (started in independent living, then went to assisted, and is now in clinical pending transfer to memory care.) I take her on walks over there to see their garden, and she is really impressed with it. If you paint it like that, they think they are getting a better deal. Course, it doesn't work if the building is ratty and the carpet is worn...but it's an idea.

 

It really works for me because our Memory care is not open right now - it's as new as the whole building, about 3 years old, but it was only open for a period of 4 months with one resident. After she passed away, we decided not to open it again unless we had at least 3 candidates, and for the first time (thanks to a great new marketing director) we have three people in line for it. So it's like ghost town over there - but the resident was really impressed with it.

 

I totally agree with taking the resident along with you to activities on the unit they might be moving. I regularly hold my bingo for both AL and Skilled on the Skilled unit, so that the AL residents have a reason to visit there several times a week. It keeps them in touch with the place, and makes it a lot easier when they move down.

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