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In Room Visit Idea


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#26 Pennie

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 08:47 PM

Hey All,
I just read the message about the music boxes/snow globes. I think that is a great suggestion. It so simple and makes me say hey why didn't I think of that. Thank you for sharing it. This will be an activity I will remember and try. P

#27 Guest_Guest_Lisa_*

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Posted 03 September 2005 - 05:55 PM

The sundae idea is great! We also have an activity that works well with in-room residents. Every morning we go around to each room, saying good morning, opening blinds, offering coffee and hot cocoa to each resident. It's a good time to see how they are feeling that day and what's going on, We call it "Good Day Rounds" It's a great way to touch base and visit with them.

:roll: Hi I am new to this site, seems very informative. on these in room visits I thought you had to have a sm. program type of visit. Is the State ok with the coffee and visiting and sundae type visit? That would be better than trying to get together with some kind of program.

I am a director at a facility that has gone from 200 beds to 80, most of the residents we have now are very low function. We were told the room visit needed to be 15 minutes,,,,,,,,,So I think you could pro fix and chat and make it almost that.......and it be okay ,My question would be about the tranportation of how much you took in to each room due to infection control.Trans from room to room.
I wonderl. :-o

#28 Guest_acs321_*

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Posted 03 September 2005 - 10:22 PM

Wow, you all have great ideas and I love it!!! Part of my 1:1 Room Visit Program is Bedside Activity, I have it scheduled in the evening 2x week, 6:30pm-its my CNAs who does this program, I designed this program for those residents who usually refuses to attend activities, lower functioning residents-so they could get more stimulations 1:1-and spend more quality time with them, or for those residents who have irregular attendance in activities. These activities are: reading books to them, playing simple trivia, sorting and folding, playing ball, nail care, massage therapy, etc- Luckily, its been working out for me, and I created an attendance for the CNA to write down the participation level of each residents-glad we have wonderful CNAs in my facility and great administrator and DON who supports my department very well, so every program I designed, there is always a nursing staff participation involvement. Hope this program will work out for you guys too, let me know. I think this act. directors' networking is excellent!!! Good luck to all

acs321

#29 ForrestGump

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Posted 04 September 2005 - 03:42 PM

Hello to all,

I have had fun recently with a new 1:1 activity. One of my residents is unable to come to group events due to diagnosis, but she is able to function pretty well, and she really enjoyed participating in this activity and learning a new trade. I learned how to do simple Balloon Animals by purchasing a book of Animal Balloons made easy. I went to my 1:1 residents and they loved it!! How wonderful it is to see a smile on those beautiful faces. ;-)

#30 Guest_Guest_*

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 05:20 PM

:-) Hi I do a lot of 1-1 visits, I have found that the individuals who are bed-bound enjoy visits from other residents who are ambulatory/ or in wheelchairs. It serves two purposes it allows the bed bound/tube fed people more contact within there own home, and it gives the visiting residence a sense of pride that they are able to do something good. You can also set a mail cart with cards, stickers... that the residence can send to each other...Getting a card from some one makes there day! I also take around beads and elastic thread. It takes only a few minutes to string a necklace or even better a bracelet....Most bed/bound res. enjoy bracelets because they can see them!! I also ask visitors and other staff to donate old beads and take them apart to re-use them...Hopes this helps

#31 Guest_sarah_*

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 06:20 PM

I too have a very hard time doing 1:1's I was under the assumption that the visits had to be 15 min. or longer too. I have done the sundae cart, and also a popcorn and drink cart. I especially like doing these on friday afternoons, its a good way to kick off the weekend. I also found that the ladies like manicures. I really have a hard time with the men's 1:1. Anyone have any good 1:1 activities for men?

#32 Guest_darci williamson_*

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Posted 08 April 2006 - 07:56 AM

I too have a very hard time doing 1:1's I was under the assumption that the visits had to be 15 min. or longer too. I have done the sundae cart, and also a popcorn and drink cart. I especially like doing these on friday afternoons, its a good way to kick off the weekend. I also found that the ladies like manicures. I really have a hard time with the men's 1:1. Anyone have any good 1:1 activities for men?

i have an idea for the 1:1 mens visits: since alot of men are competitive - play cards, dominoes, checkers etc. also ask for hints about selecting the right kind of car to buy, the right tool to use for a certain (make one up to get the resident to talking) job, talk about trains, planes women, the war (be careful some men are depressed about the war).

#33 Guest_Pat8231_*

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 03:29 PM

Hi Darci & Sarah - I work in an ALF but when I wanted to do 1:1's the AD said no. I am an AA and did 1:1's in an SNF. Some of the residents in the ALF do not wish to take part in anything outside their rooms for various reasons. I can't see an AD saying no. Oh well, Pat 8-)

#34 Guest_Spark Plug_*

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 04:01 PM

There should be something written that recreation staff can refer to when giving out any food related items to residents. It is not seem like enough to say, "I know the resident well enough" so I do not need anything written down for me. THis is because diets can change overnight. Instead of "written permission", simply ask your dietary director to give you a copy of the weekly dietary orders. Most of the time, restrictions and important data will be noted on these forms. Keep the form with your group daily attendance logs, that way, it is with you at all times. Also, we did away with "nuts" with our ice cream socials - too much potential for residents to choke or be allergic.

It is also important to understand the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes when dealing with food and the residents. It is the same disease, "diabetes" but type one diabetes typically does not have to be restricted from sweets if they are on an insulin pump or MDI to cover carbs from food.

#35 Guest_Guest_sarahdarling_*

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Posted 17 May 2006 - 09:20 AM

Sounds like a good idea  Gina - ice cream is always welcomed. Where I use to work they never served ice cream. Our room visits were split up by 3 AA's doing 4 patients each.These paitents were unable to get to the main dining room or the activities room.  We got very familiar with them and their famlies etc. 1 AA took the book cart with her.  I use to just sit with them, hold their hand and chat about everything from soup to nuts. When I left the AD just started having us do all the paitents rooms. I did that before our AD told us to because I thought it was very important to go to those who were unable to get out to the activity room.  8-) Thanks for letting me share, Pat8231

Ok, I need some help here!! I was an AD at a 120-bed facility where I was so busy that I worked 80-90 hours a week sometimes just to get everything done. I had all different types of residents. But, I have started at a new place with only 6 residents, which I love dearly, but I am having a REALLY tough time trying to find activities that suit them. All 6 are bound to their rooms. In the 3 months I have been here, I have had a group activity where they all come to the Activity Room and have dinner (Easter), Tea and dessert (Mother's Day), and I include decorations and entertainment. However, I really need in-room 1:1 ideas for ladies who: 1. don't like crafting. 2. cannot hear a thing. 3. dementia.
4. not much verbal communication. I have tried: nail care, music, massages, reading, photo album, reminiscing...ANY OTHER IDEAS?? :-(

#36 Guest_Guest_karolyn_*

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 04:15 AM

Karolyn
Sarah, Hi! To gain more insight into the interests of your 6 residents...take a
look at their initial admission Leisure Assessment, which states their previous recreation/leisure interests, which in turn will help you design the group/1:1 activities. You might have to modify/adapt these activities to suit their present functional capabilities.

#37 AmieLasalle

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 08:12 AM

The majority of my residents are in room residents, but they are also tube fed. I have been stumped about different kinds of activities for them. I do not want to leave them out of anything. Any suggestions appreciated. :-)

:-D I read your article about 1:1 acts. for residents who are tube fed. You could talk to your DON, and your speech therapist, and ask if it would be okay to rub a sucker, or life saver candy on their lips, or tongue. You can also use baby food fruits, and q-tips. Be sure to ask if it is safe, and take the speech therapist with you the first time, to show you the best way. This is great sensory stimulation. For example: Play the song I found my thrill on blueberry hill, and use blueberry babyfood, or sucker, and you could take a blue silky scarf. This can be fun, especially when residents who don't always respond, start to respond. Therapy is a good tool to use with residents with special needs. I hope this is something you can use. Let me know if it was fun.

#38 AmieLasalle

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 08:18 AM

Sounds like a good idea  Gina - ice cream is always welcomed. Where I use to work they never served ice cream. Our room visits were split up by 3 AA's doing 4 patients each.These paitents were unable to get to the main dining room or the activities room.  We got very familiar with them and their famlies etc. 1 AA took the book cart with her.  I use to just sit with them, hold their hand and chat about everything from soup to nuts. When I left the AD just started having us do all the paitents rooms. I did that before our AD told us to because I thought it was very important to go to those who were unable to get out to the activity room.  8-) Thanks for letting me share, Pat8231

Ok, I need some help here!! I was an AD at a 120-bed facility where I was so busy that I worked 80-90 hours a week sometimes just to get everything done. I had all different types of residents. But, I have started at a new place with only 6 residents, which I love dearly, but I am having a REALLY tough time trying to find activities that suit them. All 6 are bound to their rooms. In the 3 months I have been here, I have had a group activity where they all come to the Activity Room and have dinner (Easter), Tea and dessert (Mother's Day), and I include decorations and entertainment. However, I really need in-room 1:1 ideas for ladies who: 1. don't like crafting. 2. cannot hear a thing. 3. dementia.
4. not much verbal communication. I have tried: nail care, music, massages, reading, photo album, reminiscing...ANY OTHER IDEAS?? :-(

:-D You could try in room cooking class. You can use blenders to make smoothies, no bake desserts, or sandwiches. You could try creative writing with them. In room and 1:1 acts are so hard to come up with. I would also love to get some new and unique ideas.

#39 Guest_Guest_Sonya_*

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 03:11 PM

Sounds like a good idea  Gina - ice cream is always welcomed. Where I use to work they never served ice cream. Our room visits were split up by 3 AA's doing 4 patients each.These paitents were unable to get to the main dining room or the activities room.  We got very familiar with them and their famlies etc. 1 AA took the book cart with her.  I use to just sit with them, hold their hand and chat about everything from soup to nuts. When I left the AD just started having us do all the paitents rooms. I did that before our AD told us to because I thought it was very important to go to those who were unable to get out to the activity room.  8-) Thanks for letting me share, Pat8231

Ok, I need some help here!! I was an AD at a 120-bed facility where I was so busy that I worked 80-90 hours a week sometimes just to get everything done. I had all different types of residents. But, I have started at a new place with only 6 residents, which I love dearly, but I am having a REALLY tough time trying to find activities that suit them. All 6 are bound to their rooms. In the 3 months I have been here, I have had a group activity where they all come to the Activity Room and have dinner (Easter), Tea and dessert (Mother's Day), and I include decorations and entertainment. However, I really need in-room 1:1 ideas for ladies who: 1. don't like crafting. 2. cannot hear a thing. 3. dementia.
4. not much verbal communication. I have tried: nail care, music, massages, reading, photo album, reminiscing...ANY OTHER IDEAS?? :-(

8-) Try the leep program, you can find info. through the internet! It is perfect for 1:1 programming. Hope this work's for you.

#40 lllucas

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 04:44 PM

Hi, Everybody! :-)

Here's a one-on-one activity that works well for me. I have a local elementary shcool that has a special reading program established for its students (grades 1-6). Those who meet the schools requirements are allowed to join a group called Kids Kare. Kids Kare is a joint volunteer coordination between the shcool and the nursing home. The children's reward is the privilege to come to the nursing home and read to the residents in the resident's room...one-on-one. We have the children in once per month during the school year. The children love it and so do the residents.

At the end of the school year (usually during National Nursing Home Week, our facility sends the president and the vice president of the Resident Council, along with the Activity Director, to the school to hand out recognition certificates to the students who participated. We meet in the school cafeteria with one grade at a time and hand out the awards. Of course...lots of pictures are taken and the event is publicized in the local newspaper. Everyone has a lot of fun. :-D

Now is the time for you to contact your local school about establishing this event.

Wishing you the best, ;-)

Edited by lllucas, 06 August 2006 - 04:47 PM.


#41 Guest_BT_*

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 05:29 PM

Our favorite 1-1 Activity is our "Sweet Dreams" Cart. Our evening activity professional will go to each floor 1x a week in the evening after dinner. She will have milk and cookies, some Port wine, Hot cocoa or other seasonal beverages. She talks with the residents, fluff their pillows (adding lavendar scent upon request) tuck them in if they want. She also has some bed time stories if the resident would like one read to them (Chicken Soup for the Souls stuff or Aesop Fables). the residents that don't normally attend the activities enjoy this evening program and it gives us a time to do something special. I learned about this from my MEPAP Instructor.

#42 Guest_Guest_kAREN_*

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 11:32 PM

We have mostly men in our 150 bed facility, in the spring and summer I fill a basket with a handle full of garden vegetables and flowers and take it room to room. I let the residents touch, smell, look at all the vegetables and tell me how they think my husbands gardening skills are doing. Most of our residents either had a garden or they had one at their childhood home. So we remenise and share gardening secrets and tips. If you know someone who gardens big they be glad to share the harvest of a few extra vegies with your residents. Hope this helps. I will have been working as a Activity Director/Recreational Therapist for 26 years the first of Feb. 2007 and I still believe it is a job worth doing. Alot of people would just say their job is for the paycheck. How many residents will be meet again in heaven. Ever thought about it? Gives reminising a new meaning! Each of you as activity directors are doing a very important job...by giving quality of life, quanity is an eternity without it. Keep up the good work. :-D

#43 trixiedg

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Posted 22 May 2007 - 04:25 PM

I need help with how in room visits are to be done. How often should they be done, for whom, and for how long? I am thinking about putting a room visit cart together but need some ideas as to what I will need to get started. The previous AD did in rooms on paper but I am not really sure she actually did them because there is a huge lack of supplies. I really have nothing to work from. She had alot of music by CD player with headphones or in TV room watching TV when these elders were usually in a gerichair sound asleep. Does this really count since you basically turn the music on or place them near a TV and walk away? Our survey window is coming up soon and I don't want to wait until it is too late to get my department in order. If these things will work, fine but if not, I need help. I would appreciate any help or suggestions, especially when starting from scratch.

#44 bamdill65

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Posted 22 May 2007 - 04:46 PM

I need help with how in room visits are to be done. How often should they be done, for whom, and for how long? I am thinking about putting a room visit cart together but need some ideas as to what I will need to get started. The previous AD did in rooms on paper but I am not really sure she actually did them because there is a huge lack of supplies. I really have nothing to work from. She had alot of music by CD player with headphones or in TV room watching TV when these elders were usually in a gerichair sound asleep. Does this really count since you basically turn the music on or place them near a TV and walk away? Our survey window is coming up soon and I don't want to wait until it is too late to get my department in order. If these things will work, fine but if not, I need help. I would appreciate any help or suggestions, especially when starting from scratch.



#45 gfjones

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Posted 25 May 2007 - 09:05 AM

i have some wood bird feeders that come in a kit from S&S online or order a catalogue. the wood is precut so all you need is some wood glue, sandpaper, paint if desired. everything but the paint comes with the kits. I let them start it on one visit and finish on another visit.

#46 CRYSTAL887410

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 08:01 PM

:-D I have been reading your ideas for 1:1 visits....pretty good ones I think! One great in room activity that I have found to work well is hand massages. You just take some lotion (I try to use unscented if I know the resident has sensitive skin or breathing trouble) and rub it between your hands to warm it first. Massage very slowly the resident's hands. This is very relaxing and makes their hands feel so much better.

Question for anyone...Is there a regulation out there stating the amount of time that you must spend with each resident on 1:1's? I have always been told 15 minutes per resident, but if that is so, the good morning idea (which I think sounds GREAT) might not work. Anyone know?


We are required at the Facility I work at to spend 30min a week with each resident ... Very hard to do when u are the only one that does them!!!!

#47 turtle

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 09:03 PM

Hand massages are such a great in-room visit idea..even my men love it! As far as amount of time spent with a resident during 1:1, our facility policy is to spend whatever length of time it takes to meet the needs of that resident. Resident A may only require 10 minute visits daily while Resident B requires 30 minute visits 3x a week. We have not had any trouble with our surveys regarding the amount of time spent during 1:1 visits. I don't know of any regulation that specifically states an amount of time to be spent. There may be one...I just do not recall reading it anywhere. I would love to see what others have to say about the length of time spent with each resident.

#48 belindaklly

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Posted 16 May 2008 - 03:29 PM

I was wondering if anyone is working in Hospital as an Activity Director. I will be working with skilled patients and not sure what kind of 1:1 activities to do with them. Everyone has good ideas but would this be good for people that are skilled. This is a new position in the hospital and really not sure where to start. Any ideas would be great.

Belinda

#49 joanbanks86

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 11:54 AM

Joan Banks

the in room visit for me i use a chart with games and snack music and cd's , i try to find games that they like to play and go in a play

those games serve a snack. i

#50 themusiclady

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 04:49 PM

I have spent three years going to a lady's room and doing activities with her- she doesn't even know she's 'doing activities' she is completely immobile and doesn't like it if she thinks anyone is fussing!

Yesterday we watched a Christmas Carol movie and she tried English Christmas Pudding; she's dictated me her family recipes; I've taken a keyboard in there and played to her or we've sung hymns; we've 'travelled' to several places & looked at the culture; I've taken pieces of herbs and flowers and plants; put a windchime by her bed; we eat different foods she's wanted to try, one week I made a trifle; I dress up and show her my performance clothes and props and any new smart clothes I bought; if it's windy or rainy we open the windows & feel the fresh air; we've looked at her photos, my photos, George Bush's photos; read loads of poetry and scripture and talked about it; I've taken in a puppy & a tiny kitten.

Her family and the staff all do the same- take souvenirs of their trips and activities, and her son puts all the family photos on the laptop for her.

Really it's not the activity- it's the engagement involved, and I think the less physically mobile a person is the more responsive I have to be at not interrupting or being too directional. With my friend above she doesn't like it if she has to be moved or there's lots of equipment- she has no control over her environment except verbally and likes things visually where she would place them herself. That's a consideration for where to sit- can someone who can't move comfortably see. She gets insecure if there's too much physical activity going on.

If she were less able to communicate verbally then I would fill more of the speech gaps. Often the caregivers know the particular song or activity which always makes someone smile, I always ask them and watch how they work.


If the person likes spending the time and looks forward to it anything you talk about or do is going to be fun and looked-forward to- I've had more jokes and laughter with this bed-bound lady than with anyone in my life!

I love my work!!!!

~Tracy

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